REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

When Did You Start Paying Attention To Politics?

POSTED BY: DEEPGIRL187
UPDATED: Monday, December 17, 2007 11:36
SHORT URL:
VIEWED: 3624
PAGE 1 of 1

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 7:32 AM

DEEPGIRL187


And what was the catalyst for it? Was it a parent? An article in some some newspaper? Discuss.

I was probably around eleven or so. Bob Dole came to the high school and we had this huge rally. I remember being annoyed that I was forced to be present, especially considering the fact that I wouldn't vote for the guy even if I was old enough to do so. I only started actively taking an interest a few years ago, but that was the first time I probably started to consider the idea as more than an abstract concept that didn't effect me.

On the other hand, my mother always likes to relate the story of how at four years old, I proudly told her boss that I was voting for Dukakis. So maybe it was earlier than that.

*****************************************************

"This is my timey-wimey detector. It goes ding when there's stuff. Also, it can boil an egg at 30 paces, whether you want it to or not, actually, so I've learned to stay away from hens. It's not pretty when they blow."


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 7:42 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Towards the end of the Vietnam War. I had "followed" politics in the sense that I knew who was President and I knew that people in Chile got killed in a coup, but it just didn't hit home until I saw Hearts and Minds. And then it struck me that the people who were getting killed were people. Real people whose families wept and were terrified. Babies, parents, young boys and girls... I never looked at politics the same since.

---------------------------------
Always look upstream.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 8:12 AM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


When I stopped working 80 hours a week.

***************************************************************
"Global warming - it's not just a fact, it's a choice."

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 11:27 AM

FREMDFIRMA


When I realized my middle school history teacher was shovelling a load of propagandized BS at me.

Interest in history followed, soon followed by politics as I began to realize the impact such things were beginning to have on my life as I got closer to adulthood - I have ALWAYS wanted a spaceship and a lot of distance between me and this rock, long before the internet or even cellphones...

-Frem

It cannot be said enough, those who do not learn from history, are doomed to endlessly repeat it

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 11:58 AM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


My earliest political memory is seeing posters for an election when I was about eight years old, and asking my Mum which one was the Irish team. I think I got the election mixed up in my head with the world cup or something.

About a year later I was home sick from school when the IRA detonated a bomb in the town of Enniskillen during a Remembrance Day Service. That's the first incident of The Troubles that I remember. My strongest memories are of the news footage and witness descriptions that day, and an interview the father of one of the victims gave about a week later, in which he described how his daughter died while they were both trapped in the rubble. Basically, he kept asking his daughter if she was okay (he couldn't see her) and she kept saying yes, but he knew she was lying because she kept screaming. He asked her one last time if she was all right, and she replied "Daddy, I love you very much" and never spoke again. The interview made me cry.

(The part I missed was that the father said he bore no ill will to his daughters killers, which many people say prevented revenge attacks taking place in the aftermath of the blast. The man himself became an important figure in the Irish peace process. He died a few years ago.)

It was at this time that my Dad first told me that he and my Mum were in Dublin city the day it was bombed, a few years before I was born. Because they were late to their usual meeting place, they missed the first blast by several minutes. It blew my mind, realising that if they'd been on time they could well have died, and none of my family would have been born. Whenever I heard of a terrorist attack, it used to make me think of all the families that would never be. It's still a thought that gives me pause to this day.

I first became interested in the political process at eleven when my teacher explained that our two main political parties arose from the opposing sides of the Irish civil war that took place back in the 20's. That makes us different to most countries, where political parties are split along the left / right divide. The civil war is just past living memory, but a lot of people still remember the deep bitterness and division that carried over to the next generation.

That same year our teacher helped us understand two world political events - the falling of the Berlin Wall and the massacre of protesting students at Tiananmen Square. I think it's fair to say that those events, and the events in Ireland during the eighties and nineties, have shaped my interest and attitude to politics.




Even the littlest Joss chicks are absolutely kickass
Banners, Avatars, LJ Icons and other fun stuff at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 12:40 PM

JETFLAIR


Good question! I don't usually get into message board political topics, but this one caught my eye. For me it was actually as an adult, about five or six years ago.

I bought an exotic cat, an African serval. I checked the laws of my state and found that it was legal for me to own one, so I assumed I was good to go. Boy was that ever a mistake! PETA, the HSUS, and other extreme animal rights lobbies hate exotic pet ownership (well, really all pet ownership, but they fight the battles they can win) and every two years, they introduce a bill into our legislature to ban exotic pets. Guess what? They rarely have grandfather clauses, meaning if one of them passes one day, I have to give up my pet!

So....you could say my introduction to the political process was the day I testified before the state senate about exotic animals. It was the most humiliating and enraging experience....and I've had a few in my time.

It opened my eyes to politics and how messed up our political system is. From there, it was just one step away to start examining our country's current politics, the war on terror, the war in Iraq, and that nifty little issue where we, the United States, bastion of freedom, justice, and human rights, decided it was perfectly okay for us to start torturing people.

Really....I'm not sure I'm glad I started paying attention to politics. They make me walk around with a ticked-off "WTF?????" expression on my face.







"Love keeps her in the air...."

www.serenityverse.com/fffanfic - My fanfics
www.serenityverse.com/shop - Firefly Jewelry


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 1:08 PM

SICKDUDE


For me, it was a strange and slow process.

When I was young, I was interested in model kits. That led to going to airshows when I was in Arizona. Then that led to an interest in the military equipment, and also the history of war. I've always been somewhat interested in history, though. The military led to areas like foreign policy and budgetary policy. These areas in turn led to related ares like congress, the federal debt, etc. Eventually, I was following just about everything in the paper, even the interior/DNR and education. To this day, my two favorite magazines are Sierra and Air Forces Monthly (the best!!!).

"Your gratuitous jello awaits." - Dr. Helen Magnus, Sanctuary

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 4:01 PM

ALLIETHORN7


Three months ago when I was forced to take a class on it (And still am). Been interested in History for quite a few years now, but I always (And still do) found politics to be depressing. I mean, yeah, I watched the Colbert Report for shits and giggles, but noting more. The world is just so messed up that, honostely, I've stopped caring all that much. We're gonna invade Iran? Wake me up when wqe start sending Nukes, then I'll find a bomb shelter from the 50's. You can't save all the people out there- I just try to keep safe me and mine in my own lil' piece of it.

-Danny

and every time I play with passion I start breaking strings,
and my voice cracks when I sing from my heart
guess that's the price I've got to pay to know that I'm alive
this melody is tearing me apart


THRICE RULES!!!!!!!!!
My Master went to the Moon in a Rocket of Flamin' Cheese!
I LIKE CHEESE!!!
http://www.myspace.com/otherrandomdude

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 6:23 PM

THATWEIRDGIRL


As long as I can remember.

My folks taught me that it wasn't just my right, but my duty to participate. One parents was Rep and the other was Dem. I had a pretty even go at gravitating to one or the other. They always stressed that you can't rely on parties and that you have to look at the candidates.

I was always into local politics (city & state) and often accompanied my parents when they went to the polls. I guess I got into broader politics (nat'l and int'l) at about 10 or 11. As a teen I helped out on some campaigns and participated in several demonstrations. I was lucky enough to be a part of a group of local youth that met with our 1st female mayor, our Senators and Reps, and even the Surgeon General. I learned a lot about perceived power from them...especially J.Elders. She was an interesting woman to talk with. I was less fond of her after meeting her.

I registered the day I turned 18.

---
Sometimes I lie awake at night, and I ask, "Where have I gone wrong?" Then a voice says to me, "This is going to take more than one night."
-- Charlie Brown

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 6:33 PM

EVILDINOSAUR


I started paying attention around the 2004 election, partially because that was the first one I was able to vote in and largely because i found myself largely hating everything about the idiot that somehow still rules this country.

I was very saddened to see that the best the democratic party could come up with was Kerry, I mean, it really shouldn't have taken much to beat bush, and kerry was the best they could do.

I was also saddened to come to the realization the democracy means you sorta kinda have the right to choose between 2 people, a single republican or a single democrat, why would anyone need more choices than that....

"Haha, mine is an evil laugh."

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 7:26 PM

FINN MAC CUMHAL


Quote:

Originally posted by deepgirl187:
And what was the catalyst for it? Was it a parent? An article in some some newspaper? Discuss.

I was probably around eleven or so. Bob Dole came to the high school and we had this huge rally. I remember being annoyed that I was forced to be present, especially considering the fact that I wouldn't vote for the guy even if I was old enough to do so. I only started actively taking an interest a few years ago, but that was the first time I probably started to consider the idea as more than an abstract concept that didn't effect me.

On the other hand, my mother always likes to relate the story of how at four years old, I proudly told her boss that I was voting for Dukakis. So maybe it was earlier than that.



I guess it depends on what you mean by paying attention. I’ve had a political opinion since maybe late in High School, but I’m pretty sure I wasn’t paying attention to anything. I used to be a real hardcore liberal type. I used to say stupid stuff like Republicans are racists and Communism looks good on paper. But in my late years of college or certainly by the time I started graduate school, I started reading pretty widely about history and politics and it occurred it me that I’d been full of crap since I was 17. After I started paying attention to politics, my point of view changed pretty dramatically, and I started to realize that Republicans aren’t racists and Communism really doesn’t look any better on paper then it does in practice.



Nihil est incertius vulgo, nihil obscurius voluntate hominum, nihil fallacius ratione tota comitiorum.

Nothing is more unpredictable than the mob, nothing more obscure than public opinion, nothing more deceptive than the whole political system.

-- Cicero

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, November 13, 2007 9:56 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Politics as a force of government and social change, I was interested in starting around middle school, derived from school assignments. I knew all the Presidents and which I'm related to, delved into my geneology (hot topic after Roots) back to 1604, learned about the forces, causes, politics pushing populations to different continents, learned all the English Kings back to 700's, etc.

Politics as it effects our lives?
Couldn't really understand or get into current politics with all the BS public school teachers fed me, but finally got exposed after high school and opened my eyes.
I probably would have registered to vote on my 18th birthday if I could have.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 1:13 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


In 9th or 10th grade, I got into a lively discussion over oil, the price of oil and the supply. It wasn't politics per se, but more about the global economy as well as man's use of natural resources. To the surprise of most here, I was on the 'green' side, stating that the supply of oil on the planet was finite, and that we were mere decades from running out of oil.

That was 27 yrs ago. I've done an about face from my naive, young , tree hugging days. While certain figures in science had a great influence on how I see humanity and the earth's eco system, I've come to see what our fonders of this great nation , the United States of America , were really talking about when they spoke of freedom. Of course we had 'civics' in school, where we were taught HOW the Gov't works ( idealy ) but what was never explained - that i can recall - was how Right and Left were formed, and what they were suppose to mean. Probably a good thing, I don't know.

I proudly voted for Ronald Reagan in my 1st Presidential election, back in '84.

"Hillary tried to get a million dollars for the Woodstock museum. I understand it was a major cultural and pharmaceutical event. I couldn't attend. I was tied up at the time." - John McCain

It is not those who use the term "Islamo-Fascism" who are sullying the name of Islam; it is the Islamo-Fascists. - Dennis Prager

" They don't like it when you shoot at 'em. I worked that out myself. "

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 5:46 AM

JONGSSTRAW


I became interested in politics on November 22, 1963....the day Kennedy was shot. I was 10 years old & in the fourth grade. At 2:00 pm the teacher, Mrs. Deitrich, left the room for a while & then came back & said we could all go home. Kids outside were saying that Kennedy had been shot and was dead. It didn't mean very much to me I remember.....I walked home as I always did and as I approached my house I saw my mother sitting in her car in the driveway and she was crying. The whole family talked that night about what had happenned, and it was the first time I can remember being cognizant of Washington DC and politics.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 6:33 AM

SERGEANTX


What a cool topic!

I remember laying in bed when I was in grade school (circa early to mid 70's) listening to may father and grandfather arguing about various things, usually religion or politics. I used to make up arguments in my head supporting or refuting whichever positions they were taking. I always wanted to sneak down the hall and join in, because they were missing so many relevant points.

Later, in high school, I became interested in philosophy and politics in earnest after reading two books, back to back, that each have had a profound influence on my life. The first was Salinger's Catcher in the Rye. Immediately after reading that, I read Ayn Rand's Atlas Shrugged. The juxtaposition of such radically different world views has framed much of outlook.

Since then I've managed to keep attuned to the "questions-without-answers" world of Salinger, while respecting the dictates of rigorous logic embraced by Rand. Neither view offers a complete picture of life and I've always enjoyed the contrast.

SergeantX

"Dream a little dream or you can live a little dream. I'd rather live it, cause dreamers always chase but never get it." Aesop Rock

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 6:51 AM

CHRISISALL


In '73 when I was thirteen I got this feeling that I was going to Nam, so I stared digging for the real reason we were over there...then a lull after we got out, then (this sounds SO shallow) Steven Segal's Above The Law was what really shook me out of my complacency. All of a sudden my mild distrust of big government was catapulted into active anger for the s**t they pulled, pull, and plan on pullin'.
Not just in America, ALL governments.


Don't like the beast's natureisall

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 7:11 AM

HERO


Quote:

Originally posted by chrisisall:
In '73 when I was thirteen I got this feeling that I was going to Nam,


Saw alot of thirteen year old draftees from your neighborhood?

Mine was the Carter-Reagan debate. I was six. I wanted to watch something good, Mom and Dad were watching the President and the other guy. I liked the other guy...

H

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 9:02 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by Hero:

Saw alot of thirteen year old draftees from your neighborhood?


13 + 5 = dead or wounded for no good reason. That was the view from there.
When my dad told me we were there to stop communism (got the domino theory early) I thought either he was lying, or my government was nuts. Of course it was the latter. And that was without knowin' about Phoenix or Mkultra or the rest.

..the easier it is to stop up the drain Chrisisall

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 9:20 AM

RIGHTEOUS9


I never used to care much for politics...being your standard breed of American taht believes so wholly in the condition of our system and that there are people out there fighting the good fight for me, that things were well in hand.


It wasn't until about 4 months before the election of 2004 that I got interested...and not really because of the presidential race.

Once in a while I'd try to justify sitting on my ass and doing nothing by flipping over to the cable news shows, as if they were educating me on something.

What I started seeing scared the crap out of me. Not the stuff they were covering. It was how they were covering it. It was the language the anchors and pundits were using. From my very narrow, American history indoctrinated perspective that I was sold back in school, these guys didn't sound like the "live and let live", "let freedom reign", righteous, humanitarian, reasoned voices of our nation that I expected.

There was so much reactionism, so much fear mongering, so much crap that made me feel like I'd fallen down the rabbit hole, or into one of the many sci-fi books or movies with their scary visions of distopia, I felt like the world had become alien to me.

Well that was distressing, and it made my skin crawl to watch any of the cable news channels, but I guess I tuned in to be disgusted once in a while.

One time I caught Jeanine Garaffolo on O'reilley giving it to him about his style and that of the media in general, and it sounded like a voice I'd been missing from the mainstream, so I looked her up and found out she'd been on the radio for about a year. Started listening to her and the surrounding programs,

and what I heard echoed and clarified the concerns I'd been having about the main-stream "liberal" media, I'd been listening to.

So then I got really scared, listened daily and often, both to air-america and the cable news, and was often infuriated and demoralized by the media's inability to cover vetted stories that seemed like they should be damned important to Americans.

I've watched a slight shift in coverage with the debacle that was Katrina and Olbermann's growing popularity, and a distinct matriculation of more liberal offerings into the diatribes of conservative pundits after the 2006 elections, and that's a bit of a relief amidst so many things that seem terrifyingly desperate,

but that's very little of anything, and I'll be paying attention from now on.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 10:54 AM

GORRAMGROUPIE


I've been aware of world politics ever since the night I watched The Day After, by myself, against my parent's orders(they were out of the house that night, I was babysitting). The few minutes I watched scared the %$*& out of me. I realized then that there were people outside this country who could atomize me, and I had no control over that. And since my parent's house was in the approach to the local airport, every jet ehat came in for landing sounded to me like a cruise missle coming in to destroy everything I loved. I was so relieved when the wall came down, and that threat "left".

As for politics, I started becoming more aware as I got closer to 18. My parents encouraged me to register. At first I voted republican, like my parents, but now I am a solid moderate, or more to the point, unrepresented. Neither party have had anyone worth voting for in years. It's sad to vote for the lesser of two idiots. And deciding which is the lesser idiot is hard work.

So my political opinion is this: politicians are to blame for the state of things. It doesn't matter what party or philosophy they subscribe to, once they get in power the only goal is to stay in power. Fund-raising, compromising, deal making, back scratching, etc. The system's broke and we suffer.

Oh and the presidency is a smoke screen to hide the true people in power.



"It's no wonder that truth is stranger than fiction. Fiction has to make sense." - Mark Twain

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 4:24 PM

LEADB


Ah ha! Chrisall -is- older than me.

But not by much.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, November 14, 2007 4:31 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


Children - quiet please

I need my pre- and post-dinner naps.

***************************************************************
You young'uns.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, December 17, 2007 1:40 AM

SIMONWHO


ἰδιώτης was the Greek word for a "private person", someone who didn't take part in politics (ancient Greece being the birthplace of democracy) which is where we get the word "idiot" from.

That fits with my view: if you're not interested in politics, you're an idiot. Regretably democracy means your vote for the guy you'd like to have a beer with the most has the same value as someone who has thought long and hard and researched all the candidates.

I can't remember not being interested in politics. However the internet has allowed me to discover that while I initially thought I was a little right wing, I'm in fact a hardcore liberal on a global scale.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, December 17, 2007 9:31 AM

MAL4PREZ


I didn't give a damn about politics growing up, registered independent in college cause they all looked the same to me. And all those news channels seemed like sensationalists BS that didn't actually inform, only annoyed. I viewed politics like a dead cockroach in the work bathroom - icky, and someone else's job to deal with.

What scared me into really paying attention was the 2000 election. George Bush. So clearly a self-righteous, close-minded moron. Cheney, so clearly the personification of all that is wrong with corporate America (I work somewhat close to the oil industry and knew about that since way back...) And they got the nomination. That astounded me! And then the election... Bush's brother and the co-chair of his campaign played major roles in handing him the victory. OMG! What the hell? And the Supreme Court allowed it? This is not the country I was taught about in school...

It's been like watching an ongoing trainwreck since then. I still don't like politics, and I'd love to stick my head back in the sand, but can't do it.

-----------------------------------------------
hmm-burble-blah, blah-blah-blah, take a left

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, December 17, 2007 9:36 AM

BIONICBATMAN


I still haven't. And I'm going for the record of never.
Politics just give me a headache. People bickering on stuff that almost has no effect on the economy.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, December 17, 2007 10:47 AM

CANTTAKESKY


My grandfather was an anti-communist activist who lost his properties and livelihood because of his political activities (he was in China, then later Indonesia). My father, convinced that politics brings no good (seeing how he had to go hungry cause of his dad), doesn't go any further than reading newspapers.

But he read newspapers to me, and then discussed world politics with me for as far back as I can remember. I guess you can suppress it, but you can't drive it out. It's in the blood.

I grew up in dictatorships, from Singapore's police state, to the Shah's Iran, to a military dictatorship of Paraguay's Stroessner. You have to be somewhat politically aware, even as a child, to stay on the better side of the midnight knock.

I read Thoreau's Civil Disobedience in high school, and something clicked with me. I loved the idea that "government is best when it governs not at all." I tried being a Democrat for a while, since I went into the field of social work initially. Didn't see that it did much for the poor people I worked with.

Studied anarchism for a while, which is where my heart really lies. But I concluded that people were too lazy to be anarchists. They want someone to do some of the busy work for them. Settled on libertarianism as a compromise.

Got very involved with my state's Libertarian Party. Actually served as acting chair for the state LP until life got in the way.

I'm disillusioned with politics though. Not the LP, but politics as a vector of change. I think the country's beyond salvation, and we've gone beyond the point of no return. I see it plainly--it is just a matter of time before the USA ends up like the countries I grew up in.

So no more politics for me. Just run my mouth on RWED. And live outside of the country.

Can't Take My Gorram Sky
Aude sapere (Dare to know). -- Samuel Hahnemann, M.D., founder of homeopathy

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, December 17, 2007 10:56 AM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


"I'm disillusioned with politics though. Not the LP, but politics as a vector of change."

One needs to change the common philosophy before the politics changes.

***************************************************************
The hardest thing to change is a mind.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, December 17, 2007 11:36 AM

CANTTAKESKY


Quote:

Originally posted by rue:
One needs to change the common philosophy before the politics changes.

Elaborate please? Thanks.

Can't Take My Gorram Sky
Aude sapere (Dare to know). -- Samuel Hahnemann, M.D., founder of homeopathy

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

YOUR OPTIONS

NEW POSTS TODAY

USERPOST DATE

OTHER TOPICS

DISCUSSIONS
Lives Ruined by Joe Biden* and the Democrats
Sun, December 5, 2021 21:19 - 2 posts
Corona Plague was Sweden’s controversial ‘herd immunity’ strategy correct all along? Controversial COVID-19 No Lockdown strategy ‘vindicated’
Sun, December 5, 2021 21:02 - 39 posts
A thread for Democrats Only
Sun, December 5, 2021 19:59 - 6006 posts
RWED is DEAD....
Sun, December 5, 2021 19:55 - 39 posts
Mid-Term Elections 2022
Sun, December 5, 2021 18:57 - 164 posts
R.I.P. Bob Dole
Sun, December 5, 2021 16:54 - 2 posts
Deputies arrest, hold down kids who flee flu shots; woman dies from flu after flu shot
Sun, December 5, 2021 16:28 - 29 posts
Critical Race Theory 'I'm out'
Sun, December 5, 2021 16:12 - 81 posts
Somebody want to dig up the threads about Trump's "Xenophobic" travel bans?
Sun, December 5, 2021 16:09 - 41 posts
About Cancel Culture... Silencing Voices... Destroying the Past...
Sun, December 5, 2021 16:07 - 4 posts
The Charlottesville Lie : How the mainstream media are lying to us, and why it matters.
Sun, December 5, 2021 16:04 - 22 posts
Some Covid-19 thoughts
Sun, December 5, 2021 16:02 - 3406 posts

FFF.NET SOCIAL