REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

AURaptor, I have a non-political thread for you

POSTED BY: CHRISISALL
UPDATED: Thursday, April 16, 2009 23:29
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Saturday, April 11, 2009 5:20 AM

CHRISISALL


Let's have a civil, fun & interesting discussion, just to be different.

Lots of topics...

1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art?

2)Is it just me, or does football suck?

3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be?

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench?

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with.

I'll start with #4- Climb a mountain...I love diving, but if I'm gonna be cold, I at least want to be dry.




The laughing Chrisisall

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 5:24 AM

WHOZIT


I'll go with #3, Kinsey Millhone. I'd love to see Sue Grafton's books brought to the screen.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 5:36 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by whozit:
I'd love to see Sue Grafton's books brought to the screen.

I'm not a big reader (surprise!), so I'm unfamiliar with her work, but I am currently reading Burrough's Martian novels starting with "A Princess Of Mars." Amazing to me that in 1917 he got the gravity right...


The laughing Chrisisall

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 5:44 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


Quote:

Originally posted by chrisisall:
Let's have a civil, fun & interesting discussion, just to be different.



Lots of topics...

1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? ( No Kan Do )

2)Is it just me, or does football suck? ( It sucks. You ARE talking about soccer, right ? Otherwise, it's just you. )


3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be? ( That hasn't been made ? Well, you did say 'any', w/out limitations. Hmmm... Maybe John Clark ? First one that came to mind, from Clancy's 'With Out Remorse'. And yes, someone like Liev Schreiber would be my 1st choice to play Clark. Liev played as Clark in The Sum of All Fears. )

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench? ( Dive, dive, dive ! That's an iffy one, as there's only so far the human body can go underwater, un- aided by a vehicle, I mean. How about just diving in general ? Say to a colorful reef, or a nice wreck ? )

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with. ( The Hobbit )







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Saturday, April 11, 2009 6:05 AM

RIPWASH


1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? Drunken Monkey, for no other reason than that the mere name fascinates me. Otherwise, even though my son is training in Shinsei Hapkido, I know next to nothing other than what I've seen Chuck Norris and Steven Segal do.

2)Is it just me, or does football suck? American football is dull and boring, I like soccer better but don't watch it. Not that big of a sports guy I guess.

3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be? Dirk Gently's Holistic Detective Agency.

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench? Um . . . neither.

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with. I'm currently enthralled with the King Raven Trilogy by Stephen Lawhead. It's a fictional account of what the Robin Hood story might have actually been in historical context (i.e - it was more likely that the events from bardic tales may have happened in Wales, not England). Great read.


Zoe: "Get it running again."
Mal: "Yeah"
Zoe: "So not running now"
Mal: "Not so much"
- Out of Gas

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 6:12 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by AURaptor:

Liev played as Clark in The Sum of All Fears.

Y'know, I didn't love that film, but he WAS the best thing about it IMO.
Quote:

How about just diving in general ? Say to a colorful reef, or a nice wreck ?
Done the reef thing- it was a slice of heaven, never did the wreck thing- I'd like to...but that's all warm water.
Quote:

The Hobbit
Good read- I liked it better than the later trilogy myself.


The laughing Chrisisall

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 6:14 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:
1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? Drunken Monkey, for no other reason than that the mere name fascinates me. Otherwise, even though my son is training in Shinsei Hapkido, I know next to nothing other than what I've seen Chuck Norris and Steven Segal do.


The real Drunken Style is quite effective. Actually, there is no real "best" martial art, it all depends on the individual. My thing is Wing Chun, but a good student of Aikido will trounce a mediocre Wing Chun student.


The laughing Chrisisall

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 6:44 AM

BYTEMITE


1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? Shaolin Chuan Fa, but that's because it's been around the longest... And because it's what I've had some training in, so I'm a bit biased. Still, though I have a lot of respect for the other styles, I enjoy the spiritual discipline and history of the old temple-boxing form.

2)Is it just me, or does football suck? I kind of like football... Both kinds.

3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be? I'll have to think about it. I can't think of any that haven't already been made right now...

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench? Climb a mountain! I'm a big fan of hiking, all the scenery and wildlife, and then you get to stand on the top of the world and just say, Yes, I'm here.

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with. Hmm, well, I really enjoyed Desert Solitaire by Edward Abbey when I read it. I think that's something else I have to think more about. :)

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 6:44 AM

CITIZEN


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:
1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? Drunken Monkey, for no other reason than that the mere name fascinates me. Otherwise, even though my son is training in Shinsei Hapkido, I know next to nothing other than what I've seen Chuck Norris and Steven Segal do.


Drunken Monkey? Is that some sort of fusion between Drunken Boxing and Monkey style Kung Fu?

Steven Segal practices Akido, which is mainly locks and holds, some throws. Chuck Norris I don't know about, but I'd guess it's some form of Karate.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 6:47 AM

CITIZEN


Quote:

Originally posted by Bytemite:
1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? Shaolin Chuan Fa, but that's because it's been around the longest...


I don't believe it has. Hwang Kwon Do of Korea has been around over 2000 years. It's not called that any more though, after the Japanese occupation of Korea ended the schools resurfaced (all martial arts were band under the Japanese) and split into two major lineages:
Tang Soo Do and Tai Kwon Do.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 6:53 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


Quote:

Quote:


The Hobbit


Good read- I liked it better than the later trilogy myself.




That The Hobbit was written primarily for children might be telling, for both of us.






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Saturday, April 11, 2009 7:41 AM

CHRISISALL


Naw, it's meant for everyone, and it doesn't go on for page after page on a sword's history that just being mentioned in passing...


The laughing Chrisisall

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:00 AM

FREMDFIRMA


>>1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art?

Krow-Barr, closely following, Too-Bie-Forr, preferably from behind, in the dark.

>>2)Is it just me, or does football suck?

You're only just NOW noticing this ?

>>3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be?

Yuna, from final fantasy, complete with moral lessons about finding solutions that benefit everyone in a longterm fashion, and the importance of acceptance.

>>4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench?

Build a super-sub and check out the bottom of the Mariana!

>>5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with.

MOMO, by Michael Ende.


-F

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:03 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? Tai Chi or Bagwa. Anyone who's ever seen Bruce Kumar in action would likely agree.

2)Is it just me, or does football suck? It's not just you. But then, I'm not a big sports fan in general.

3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be? I'd like to be in charge of any movie based on one of my favorite books, etc, just so I could see them done right...

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench? Probably dive. I like that feeling of weightlessness.

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with. Criminy, it would be hard to chose. I just re-read 'Storyteller' which is an excellent sci-fi book by Amy Thompson. I like all of her books, I wish she'd kept writing. I'm also a big fan of Anne Bishop's stories. And I've read all the works of Douglas Adams more times than I could reasonably estimate. Tolkien of course. Terry Goodkind. Sorry, this is just turning into a list of authors

[/sig]

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:07 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench? Probably dive. I like that feeling of weightlessness.




You can get that feeling with mountain climbing too, but only once, and only for a short period of time.






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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:09 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Are you advising me to go jump off a cliff?!?

[/sig]

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:14 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:
Are you advising me to go jump off a cliff?!?

[/sig]




Just pointing out pros and cons.






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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:20 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Oh, go jump off a cliff

[/sig]

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:24 AM

AURAPTOR

America loves a winner!


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:
Oh, go jump off a cliff




That's an 'underwater' cliff, right ?






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Saturday, April 11, 2009 8:32 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:
Are you advising me to go jump off a cliff?!?


I am.
Just have a good parachute.


The laughing Chrisisall

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 9:02 AM

GEEZER

Keep the Shiny side up


1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art?

Defensive pistol. Long-range rifle.

2)Is it just me, or does football suck?

A good bit of the time. However, a good football game is a real art form.

3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be?

Lazarus Long, Blackford Oakes, Marcus Didius Falco. Maybe Casca Rufio Longinus, from some of the Casca series of novels by Barry Sadler, et. al.

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench?

Neither. Snorkeling in warm water is OK.

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with.

I read 4 or 5 a week, so this is hard. I read LOR every couple of years. Heinlein, of course. "The Yiddish Policeman's Union", by Michael Chabon is pretty good, as is most stuff by Mark Helprin, and I keep re-reading "Last Stand of the Tin Can Sailors" by James D. Hornfischer. I'm currently reading "George Washington's Secret Navy - How the American Revolution Went to Sea" by James L. Nelson, with "Juggler of Worlds" a Ringworld prequel, on deck.



"Keep the Shiny side up"

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 9:51 AM

BYTEMITE


Citizen: This is where all the martial arts lineages get kind of funny, because they ALL want to claim they're the oldest, so what oral and historical accounts you get, you have to take into context who's telling the story. My story is biased towards Shaolin Chuan Fa, I admit.

But I can tell you what history I've been told. Some of what I said above was exaggerated, because it's been a long time since I reviewed this. Perhaps I would have been more accurate to say that MOST modern martial arts styles derive from Shaolin Chuan Fa, Chinese and Japanese forms in particular.

In 5 BC, an Indian (called by the Chinese Han Lo-Ming) is reported to have created the first documented oriental martial arts style, Chi Hsuan Men (Unusual style).

The Chinese credit Hua T'o as creating the first purely Chinese martial arts style in 220 AD.

Shaolin Chuan Fa was established when an Indian Prince named Sardilli (also known as Bodhidharma or Ta Mo) traveled over the Himalayan mountains into China, sort of the first archetypal traveling Buddhist warrior monk. He settled in the Shaolin temple in 526 AD and established Shaolin Chuan Fa, temple boxing, as a way of keeping the monks fit and sharp between meditation.

Now, since this IS an entirely Chinese perspective, I don't know much about the Korean one. My general impression was that the martial arts as we commonly know them first arose in China. But war has been around a lot longer than 2000 years, some credit Greek Pankraton, invented around 3000 BC, as influencing Asian martial arts as well. So I don't have trouble conceiving that other martial forms might have existed prior to 2000 years ago (they must have), but I don't know how much they would have in common with modern day martial arts.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 10:47 AM

CITIZEN


Quote:

Originally posted by Bytemite:
Shaolin Chuan Fa was established when an Indian Prince named Sardilli (also known as Bodhidharma or Ta Mo) traveled over the Himalayan mountains into China, sort of the first archetypal traveling Buddhist warrior monk. He settled in the Shaolin temple in 526 AD and established Shaolin Chuan Fa, temple boxing, as a way of keeping the monks fit and sharp between meditation.


As I understand it Shaolin Chuan Fa is an adaptation of Tai Chi, which developed from the original strengthening exercises of Bodhidharma. In fact I know a fair bit about bodhidharma, I had to recount his story from memory to my master for one of my Kung Fu stages (the form I followed was more traditional, you don't have belts, belts keep your trousers up). Bodhidharma didn't create the art, at least according to my story, he created the Chi exercises that laid the foundations of Tai Chi and Kung Fu (spending years in a cave and what have you). On the Kung Fu side of things that developed in to the Lohan style. The exercises were meant to strengthen the monks, who bodhidharma found to be weak and feeble. After the Manchurian conquest of greater China, Buddhist monks weren't able to travel freely, due to widespread banditry. So one temple, named Shaolin which translates to little forest, developed a fighting style for self defence called Lohan. Following that was Tiger style, a rigid but strong fighting technique that incorporated the widely space tiger stance, and Shaolin punch. This was offset by Monkey style which was a faster technique, designed to close quickly and deliver fast strikes, usually with the fingers, to pressure points, then withdraw, preventing the Tiger from responding.

To counter that, the Crane style was developed. The crane focuses on gaining touch contact with ones opponent, and following them as they attempt to strike and withdraw. All attacks can be anticipated, as the opponents preparations (shifting centre of gravity, muscle tension) can be felt through the touch contact. Meanwhile the crane can wait until their opponent leaves themselves open to a strike.

My own style was Tiger-Crane combination, called Nam Yang. It's mythology stretches back to the Manchurian period, when reportedly an old tiger master challenged a young girl who practised crane, and was so impressed by her ability to kick his arse, that he married her and they developed the fusion style.

I did find this Wiki article about my own style, I practised in Epsom under Ian Armstrong:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nam_yang

Anyway. The mythology of my own club places Bodhidharma and Kung Fu's foundations to about 1500 years ago.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 10:55 AM

ANTHONYT

Freedom is Important because People are Important


Hello,

There has always been a lot of emphasis put on the oldest martial art. I have never understood this. Carefully maintaining a particular style through many ages of mankind, steadfastly insisting it was the first, and hence the best.

One would imagine that the best martial art would be one that was never the same from one generation to the next, one that improved with each new master, and one which bears absolutely no resemblance to its earliest ancestor.

For all I know the Marines may have the best martial art, because you can teach it effectively in six weeks. *shrugs* I don't know enough to render an educated opinion, but this is what I always thought.

--Anthony


"Liberty must not be purchased at the cost of Humanity." --Captain Robert Henner

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 11:14 AM

CITIZEN


Well there's a certain logic to it. If it's the oldest, it means it's the one that has kept it's practitioners alive through the ages

Though I agree. My particular option is that Krav Maga is probably the most practical martial art, partial because it takes a scientific approach to self defence, and isn't encumbered by years of tradition (being invented in Hungry by a Jewish man who wanted to beat up Brownshirts.

Even the ethos of Krav maga makes sense. Back off, and if they don't let you, kill or cripple the fucker as quickly as possible, then run away.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 3:15 PM

BYTEMITE


That sounds pretty right to me. The school I was part of tried to teach Tai Chi alongside Shaolin Chuan Fa, and I think in traditional practice they were probably fairly inseparable.

I was only able to afford the kung fu classes, though. And I only managed to take about a year, so I only got slightly less than halfway through being introduced to everything. I never really found the form that suited me best, either. :)

The only difference is that the five animals we learned were Tiger, LEOPARD, Crane, DRAGON, and SNAKE. But I'm pretty sure leopard and monkey are synonymous, as are snake and praying mantis.

Along with the animal styles, we also could learn around 160 combinations and a bunch of training forms.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 3:34 PM

DEEPGIRL187


1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art?
I'm no where near an expert on martial arts, but I've always found Capoeira very interesting.

2)Is it just me, or does football suck?
The only sport I've ever liked is hockey, so yeah.

3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be?
As many things as I've read over the years, that one's kind of hard. Though after getting screwed out of a series, a movie with Harry Dresden would be pretty cool.

4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench?
Probably neither. I have this thing about heights, and while I am truly fascinated by the ocean, I unfortunately can't swim.

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with.
Favorite book of all time is Little Miss Strange, by Joanna Rose. Book I am currently enthralled with is actually one I haven't read; House of Leaves, by Mark Danielewski. I've heard a lot of interesting things about it.

**************************************************

"This is my timey-wimey detector. It goes ding when there's stuff. Also, it can boil an egg at 30 paces, whether you want it to or not, actually, so I've learned to stay away from hens. It's not pretty when they blow."

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 3:38 PM

BYTEMITE


You know, it's funny. I love hiking, and I love summitting peaks, but I have acrophobia so bad I get shakes when I'm only 5 feet off the ground.

There HAVE been times that I've had to crawl up and down a mountain because the fear of heights kicked in. If it's an exposed ledge, I can really get freaked out.

Angel's Landing was somewhat interesting, in the "oh god I'm going to die" way. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel%27s_Landing) The scarier part is, I know that if I just calmed the hell down, I'd be a lot safer and wouldn't stumble around so much, but I can't really help it.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 4:07 PM

DEEPGIRL187


Quote:

Originally posted by Bytemite:
You know, it's funny. I love hiking, and I love summitting peaks, but I have acrophobia so bad I get shakes when I'm only 5 feet off the ground.

There HAVE been times that I've had to crawl up and down a mountain because the fear of heights kicked in. If it's an exposed ledge, I can really get freaked out.

Angel's Landing was somewhat interesting, in the "oh god I'm going to die" way. ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Angel%27s_Landing) The scarier part is, I know that if I just calmed the hell down, I'd be a lot safer and wouldn't stumble around so much, but I can't really help it.



Those pictures are really amazing. If I weren't such a scaredy-cat, I'm sure that would be a wonderful experience. And kudos to you for still trying to climb in spite of your fear.

**************************************************

"This is my timey-wimey detector. It goes ding when there's stuff. Also, it can boil an egg at 30 paces, whether you want it to or not, actually, so I've learned to stay away from hens. It's not pretty when they blow."

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 5:05 PM

BYTEMITE


Oh, I don't climb. That's a bit TOO vertical for me. Although if I learned to just trust the rope, maybe it'd help me get over it somewhat...

No, I just hike. Although I can see how someone might get confused by those photographs of angel's landing: there's a trail out to it from the top of a nearby mesa (scout's landing). You just have to walk along a spine that's about 5 feet wide (meaning the trail is usually about 2 feet wide), with 2000 foot drop offs on either side.

And, for the record? Under no circumstances am I brave enough to EVER DO THAT AGAIN.

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Saturday, April 11, 2009 11:49 PM

CITIZEN


Quote:

Originally posted by Bytemite:
The only difference is that the five animals we learned were Tiger, LEOPARD, Crane, DRAGON, and SNAKE. But I'm pretty sure leopard and monkey are synonymous, as are snake and praying mantis.

Along with the animal styles, we also could learn around 160 combinations and a bunch of training forms.


I forgot about praying mantis, because it's outside of the progression I was taught. I remember it being mentioned, but never really knew what set it apart.

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Sunday, April 12, 2009 7:47 AM

FREMDFIRMA


Deepgirl, Byte ?

Funny tale related to that which might amuse you...

I *did* used to do a little rock climbing, shortly after I started to really recover from the accident, and this was about the time I started getting involved in prosthetic design cause I kept breaking the damn things, much to the chagrin of the folks building them.
(MD and TX, are respectively, terrible, and worse, as regards this technology)

So, with that in mind, fast forward to a small bit of rock that Mick and I decided we were gonna climb, and him being a reasonably fit chunk of mountain man muscle, he makes it up there in about half the time I did, sittin on the edge watchin me fight for every inch cause imma stubborn jackass...

Now, the newest prosthetic had taken quite a beating by this time, and unknown to me at the time, one of those hits had gouged a nice chunk out of it's thin (but thankfully light!) fibreglass shaft on the way up - and so I get to a bit of what climbers call a rock chimney.
http://www.ehow.com/how_6972_climb-chimney-rock.html

This one was pretty wide, and so I was bracing my shoulders against the backside and using my legs to hold myself in place while I took a breather and dug in my pouch for a tube of water.

Ever seen a fishin rod break ?
Starts to bend, then the fibres go with this plinkiplinkiplink noise, and then SNAP, right in half.

So the shaft of the prosthetic starts to bow, and my left foot slips a bit, and sure enough, plinkplinkSNAP, and after a moment I catch on the left foot, and look down to see my right shoe, with prosthetic foot and most of the shaft, bouncing merrily down the chimney right along with the tube of water I dropped while scrabbling... oh joy, oh joy.

Well, shit, that's just great.

"Yo, throw me the rope" I shout up the chimney.
"You givin up already, you wimp?!"
"Uh no, gotta problem here, seriously!"
"Well what ?"
"You ain't gonna believe me if I tell ya, see for yourself!"

And I slip one hand free and hike up my pants leg so he can see the problem, and when he stops LAUGHING a couple minutes later, he tosses the rope down and we manage a good ole heave-ho marathon and get me up there so we can go down the back side slope, which wasn't too hard given I am so puny and him so freakin huge he just picked me up and carried me over the rough spots like one would do with a small child, lol.

Made him go get the foot, too, those were new shoes!

That's why we went to titanium, and later, carbon fiber for the main shaft, actually, cause it was after that fiasco that I started getting into prosthetic design - there's a more serious climber who did as well, and he has some specialty rigs custom built for climbing.

Gotten too old for that kinda lunacy myself, but the mental image of me pinned there watching that shoe bounce it's way down is always worth a chuckle.

-Frem

It cannot be said enough, those who do not learn from history, are doomed to endlessly repeat it

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Sunday, April 12, 2009 9:49 AM

BYTEMITE


Well, that's what he gets for laughing at you!

Are you thinking of Aron Ralston? The guy who had to cut through his own arm because he was doing some backcountry exploring and it got crushed under a shifting boulder? I know he's still rock-climbing, and has had to get into prosthetic design so he could keep doing it.

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Sunday, April 12, 2009 11:55 AM

FREMDFIRMA


No, but yanno, Aron should go have a chat with the guy, I think...

I was speakin of Hugh Herr, actually.
http://www.media.mit.edu/people/bio_hherr.html

http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/magazine/articles/2008/06/29/running
_strong
/

The paradigm shift in my head came a few months later. I thought, 'Gee, a huge fraction of my body is artificial. It's a blank slate I can create whatever I want with. My artificial feet need not look human. They can be optimized for the vertical world.'"

I go a slightly different route, preferring purely mechanical prosthetics which can operate in locked mode if something goes wrong or they get damaged (which is HARD, cause I torture test em but *GOOD*!) as opposed to more fragile electronic or myo-type limbs - and while I too, don't give a damn what they look like, I've taken to not just restoring function, but improving it if possible, like my ice spikes on the current unit, which came in right handy when walking rounds the day site threes snowblower went kapooftie and they had to be walked on refrozen slush that was being pelted with freezing rain at the time.

My initial inspiration was an engineer named Barry, who got his left arm caught in a machine on the line while trying to rescue someone from their own stupidity, and was severely pissed at the near useless cosmetic left hand and arm they gave him, so being an engineer...

Built himself a damned awesome power-operated tool hand with detatchable pieces - I thought it was like the most awesome thing ever, and his "why whine when you can innovate" attitude was one of the things that prevented me from suffering most of the usual psychological issues with loss of limb.

Of course, my budget is limited, but some stuff I've cooked up on paper... 12G defensive shotgun w/3 round clip, compressed air powered jump spring, crazy stuff right out of batman comics.

My current project is a flashlight mounted on the knee guard, powered by the action of the limb itself, so that I can have effective illumination when walking rounds without tying up a hand*, or worryin about batteries, which always DIE at the worst possible moment.

*Clipboard, clock, flashlight, radio, and only two hands ? for a FACT the more crap you burden down a guard with, the less of their attention is on the job at hand, and time spent juggling all that crap is time not spent paying attention to what they should be, we have a "free hand" policy in that unless absolutely required, all guards MUST maintain one free hand at all times - it sounds strange, but it does keep their attention on the job instead of their gear.

-Frem
It cannot be said enough, those who do not learn from history, are doomed to endlessly repeat it

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Sunday, April 12, 2009 1:34 PM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by citizen:

I forgot about praying mantis, because it's outside of the progression I was taught. I remember it being mentioned, but never really knew what set it apart.

I took classes in that. I really liked it, it was very fun, but had a lot of extra movements in it. It seemed to me like a flowery version of Wing Chun.


The laughing Chrisisall

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Monday, April 13, 2009 4:23 AM

RIPWASH


Quote:

Originally posted by citizen:
Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:
1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art? Drunken Monkey, for no other reason than that the mere name fascinates me. Otherwise, even though my son is training in Shinsei Hapkido, I know next to nothing other than what I've seen Chuck Norris and Steven Segal do.


Drunken Monkey? Is that some sort of fusion between Drunken Boxing and Monkey style Kung Fu?

Steven Segal practices Akido, which is mainly locks and holds, some throws. Chuck Norris I don't know about, but I'd guess it's some form of Karate.



Sorry it took me a little while to respond to this. From what I see on Wikipedia . . . only the most accurate source of information EVER . . . it is similar to, but not quite like "Drunken Boxer". It's a form all it's own, I guess.

I thought one of the things about Akido was using your oponents momentum against them. Like when Segal grabs the wrist of an opponents thrown clenched fist and pulls it so the guy's face crunches into Segal's elbow. Something like that. LOL

Zoe: "Get it running again."
Mal: "Yeah"
Zoe: "So not running now"
Mal: "Not so much"
- Out of Gas

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Monday, April 13, 2009 4:27 AM

RIPWASH


Let's add another dimension to this . . .

What is a guilty pleasure of yours? Can be music, art, movie, tv, whatever.

I asked . . . I'll start.

Right now I'm listening to *gulp* ABBA and lovin' it. LOL

Zoe: "Get it running again."
Mal: "Yeah"
Zoe: "So not running now"
Mal: "Not so much"
- Out of Gas

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Monday, April 13, 2009 4:39 AM

CITIZEN


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:
Sorry it took me a little while to respond to this. From what I see on Wikipedia . . . only the most accurate source of information EVER . . . it is similar to, but not quite like "Drunken Boxer". It's a form all it's own, I guess.


Ok, so I looked at wiki and it says:
Quote:

Drunken Monkey Form or Drunken Monkey Pole Form of Kung Fu is a Chinese martial art, and one of the variations of the Monkey Style.

This style is different from Zui Quan (Drunken Fist), as the practitioner is imitating gestures of an intoxicated monkey, rather than a human fighter.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drunken_Monkey

So in other words it's a variation of the Monkey style, that mimics movements of a Drunken Monkey, the way Drunken Boxing mimics the movements of a Drunken Man.
Quote:


I thought one of the things about Akido was using your oponents momentum against them. Like when Segal grabs the wrist of an opponents thrown clenched fist and pulls it so the guy's face crunches into Segal's elbow. Something like that.


All grappling styles are designed to use the opponents weight and strength against them. In fact most martial arts are about that, it's kinda the point, how a smaller weaker opponent can defeat and larger stronger one.

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Monday, April 13, 2009 4:47 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:

What is a guilty pleasure of yours? Can be music, art, movie, tv, whatever.


Conan The Destroyer & Robocop 3, okay, is that enough? It's just because of the MUSIC! I love Poledouris...


The embarrassed Chrisisall

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Monday, April 13, 2009 4:50 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by citizen:
it's a variation of the Monkey style, that mimics movements of a Drunken Monkey, the way Drunken Boxing mimics the movements of a Drunken Man.

From what I've seen of Drunken Monkey, if I used it I'd hurt myself more than my opponent, LOL.
It's a style for kids IMO.


The laughing Chrisisall

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Monday, April 13, 2009 6:22 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:

What is a guilty pleasure of yours?

Mickey D's fillet-O-fish.
'Nuff said.


The laughing Chrisisall

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Monday, April 13, 2009 7:51 AM

KWICKO

"We'll know our disinformation program is complete when everything the American public believes is false." -- William Casey, Reagan's presidential campaign manager & CIA Director (from first staff meeting in 1981)


1)What do you feel is the most effective real-life martial art?


A Barrett .50 caliber sniper rifle.



2)Is it just me, or does football suck?


Yes. To either one, actually. :)



3)If you could make a movie about any fictional character at all who would it be?


Shepherd Derial Book. I'm just dying to know his real story.

Or, if it could be done well (and I don't believe it could be), Louis Wu, the protagonist in Larry Niven's Ringworld series of books.



4)Climb a mountain or dive an ocean trench?


Dive. I've done a little of both, but prefer diving. I'd rather run the risks of coming up from the ocean depths too quick than of coming down a mountain too quick. ;)

5)Favourite book or one currently enthralled with.


A couple all-time favorites are Ayn Rand's The Fountainhead and Atlas Shrugged. I'm also a bit enthralled with Frederick Pohl's Gateway, but haven't re-read it in some years, and I never could get into the later books in the series.


Mike

Build a man a fire and he'll be warm for a day...
Set a man on fire and he'll be warm for the rest of his life.

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Monday, April 13, 2009 7:54 AM

FREMDFIRMA


Quote:

Mickey D's fillet-O-fish.

Ewwww!
Quote:

Ayn Rand

*shudder*

I am actually passionate fond of Arthur Treachers, which I was quite fond of as a kid, and yet all but vanished when the company fell upon hard times.

The ex has never let me live down the wheel spinning, tire screaming, bootleggers U-turn I pulled in the middle of Brice road when I spotted one after twenty years of goin without.

It's prettymuch the only reason I ever visit the armpit of america that is Ohio.
http://www.arthurtreachers.com/at-menu.htm

My current "guilty" pleasure is the Anime version of Azumanga Daioh.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Azumanga_Daioh
It's oddly compelling for something without a real plot, and what with all the violence, general nastiness and pathetic wangst of movies & TV these days, it's kind of a nice break to see something sweet - the characters have a sort of firefly-ish "family" vibe too.

Did I mention it's quite silly ?


One thing I found hit the floor hilarious was that, since people from Osaka are the Japanese equivalent of hillbillies, when they dubbed it into english, they used a southern-fried voice actor for that character, and it works just a little TOO well, meh heh heh.

I shelled out the dosh to put the series on my Anime shelf, and there's really no higher compliment than that.

-Frem

It cannot be said enough, those who do not learn from history, are doomed to endlessly repeat it

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Monday, April 13, 2009 8:27 AM

RIPWASH


Armpit Ohio, huh?

I actually worked at an Arthur Treacher's in Columbus a LONG time ago.

I never could figure out why AT and LJS thought triangular fish looked right. Always struck me as kind of odd. I'm partial to Captain D's myself. Worked there for about 8 years or so and still didn't mind eating there at all.

For food guilty pleasure? Wow. Too many to list. I do kinda like Waffle House and did manage to scarff down the Tremendous 12 at a Perkins Restaraunt once. LOL

Probably my biggest though is Twinkies. I could eat a box of those suckers.

Zoe: "Get it running again."
Mal: "Yeah"
Zoe: "So not running now"
Mal: "Not so much"
- Out of Gas

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Monday, April 13, 2009 9:51 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:

Probably my biggest though is Twinkies. I could eat a box of those suckers.


Those are made with *gulp* animal fats....




The laughing Chrisisall

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Monday, April 13, 2009 9:52 AM

RIPWASH


Animal fats = good eatin'.

Meat is murder . . . . tasty, tasty murder.

Zoe: "Get it running again."
Mal: "Yeah"
Zoe: "So not running now"
Mal: "Not so much"
- Out of Gas

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Monday, April 13, 2009 9:57 AM

CHRISISALL


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:
Animal fats = good eatin'.


Animal fats taste greasy & smell weird.


The laughing Chrisisall

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Monday, April 13, 2009 10:01 AM

RIPWASH


Bacon . . . that's some good animal fat, right there. That's the new thing in our household thanks to Jim Gaffigan's new special on Comedy Central.

"Even the cooking of bacon sounds like applause . . . . AHHHHHHHHHHHHHH Yay Bacon!"

Zoe: "Get it running again."
Mal: "Yeah"
Zoe: "So not running now"
Mal: "Not so much"
- Out of Gas

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Monday, April 13, 2009 10:30 AM

CITIZEN


Quote:

Originally posted by RIPWash:
Animal fats = good eatin'.

Meat is murder . . . . tasty, tasty murder.



So's eating plants, and those bastards eat them ALIVE. Viciously devouring leaf after living leaf of Lettuce, deaf to their screams...

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Monday, April 13, 2009 10:37 AM

RIPWASH


I've seen the heads of lettuce. Didn't notice the mouth, though.

Zoe: "Get it running again."
Mal: "Yeah"
Zoe: "So not running now"
Mal: "Not so much"
- Out of Gas

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