REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

Shout out to Second - hope you are doing well

POSTED BY: G
UPDATED: Sunday, September 24, 2017 14:08
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Thursday, September 7, 2017 1:53 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I was also wondering: of the 75% in Houston who were above Flood Level, how many were unaffected? Any power interruptions for them? Looting? Water and sewer continued service? Gas stations still working? Got flooded anyhow?

did this get missed?

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Thursday, September 7, 2017 3:25 PM

WISHIMAY

There will be fire and brimstone and Earth will be destroyed!... in several billion years!----------------------------------------- "Well, so long Earth. Thanks for the air... and what-not." -Philip J. Fry


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
where was the segue?
Were they older? Where was this "class" - Voc School, or what?



The segue was 6ix's video where he jokes if you aren't religious you usually end up a "spiritual massage therapist".

The class was a run by a guy who ran a reflexology massage business. It no longer fulfills the legal requirements, but back in the 90's it did. The other guy and girl were about 6 years older. No, they didn't teach "happy endings." That was a joke.

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Friday, September 8, 2017 12:50 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I heard that JJ Watt's fund page has topped $1.5 Billion in a day or 2. Apparently shut down the fund servers unable to handle the traffic.

Are you deliberately misleading? Because you are off by about $1.5 Billion.

Houston Flood Relief Fund
For: Victims of Hurricane Harvey
Houston, TX
Organizer: JJ Watt
Houston Flood Relief Fund (Victims of Hurricane Harvey)

Raised $2,166,539 of $3,000,000 goal.
Raised by 25,947 donors
www.youcaring.com/victimsofhurricaneharvey-915053


news tonight reports Watt's fund is over 7.2 million.
That's $5 Million in the past day.

News reports over $18 Million now.

news reports over $29 Million now.

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Friday, September 8, 2017 7:16 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:

news reports over $29 Million now.

To put that puny $29 Million into prospective, and to show how most flood damage could have been avoided if only Houstonians had acted like they have enough commonsense to learn from the many, many past floods:

FEMA looks to buy out homes flooded by Hurricane Harvey

September 7, 2017

The Federal Emergency Management Agency said it is working to accelerate buyouts of repeatedly flooded properties following Hurricane Harvey in hopes of helping Houstonians escape perennially soggy neighborhoods and keeping the federal government from paying to rebuild homes time and time again.

It's unclear how many homes in Houston might be affected by the buyout plan. Roy Wright, the FEMA official who runs the National Flood Insurance Program, declined to provide details.

Wright said the buy-out acceleration was spurred, at least in part, by a Houston homeowner who called his office late one evening last week. The homeowner, whom he did not identify, had returned to her home after the Harvey flood and called to ask for a buyout.

Harris County has already bought out more homeowners than any county in the country, Wright said, spending $225 million in purchases over the last 20 years. [ If 100 times this amount had been spent, equal to $22.5 billion, FEMA would not be looking at a bill for $180 billion in Federal aid to the flooded. ]

Of the 1.1 million residential structures in Harris County, only one in five, or about 230,000, have national flood insurance. Of the county’s 130,000 residential buildings in “high hazard” areas — those in the so-called 100-year floodplains -- less than half, or about 55,000, are covered, despite requirements for such insurance.

www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/FEMA-looks-to-buyout-homes-f
looded-by-Hurricane-12180372.php


99.5 percent of people are able to remain in their homes.

94 percent of homes suffered no damage.

At any given point, more than 98 percent of Houstonians have electric power, and 92 percent of Houstonians never lose power.

The economic damage caused by the disaster is estimated to be 10 percent to 20 percent of annual regional economic output, some of which is covered by insurance or tax deductible. This is like someone who makes a salary of $60,000 having suffering loss of $6,000 to $12,000.

www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion/outlook/article/Linbeck-Hurricane-Har
vey-was-not-a-catastrophe-12174976.php

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Friday, September 8, 2017 4:47 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I heard that JJ Watt's fund page has topped $1.5 Billion in a day or 2. Apparently shut down the fund servers unable to handle the traffic.

Are you deliberately misleading? Because you are off by about $1.5 Billion.

Houston Flood Relief Fund
For: Victims of Hurricane Harvey
Houston, TX
Organizer: JJ Watt
Houston Flood Relief Fund (Victims of Hurricane Harvey)

Raised $2,166,539 of $3,000,000 goal.
Raised by 25,947 donors
www.youcaring.com/victimsofhurricaneharvey-915053


news tonight reports Watt's fund is over 7.2 million.
That's $5 Million in the past day.

News reports over $18 Million now.

news reports over $29 Million now.


I was thinking that part of the good here was that one person was able to provide a conduit for people to funnel support. One that did not reek of corruption, was going to result in less than 5% of funds actually applied to the intended and pledged purpose.

Some people can use the help, even if they were stupid enough to buy in flood zones which flood every year lately.

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Friday, September 8, 2017 4:59 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
Quote:

Originally posted by SHINYGOODGUY:
Hey Second, sending you good thoughts, prayers, vibes and everything positive; and that you and yours are safe. Also sending good thoughts to the good folk of Texas.

I'm sure Second's fine. He doesn't seem to be the type that would have bought a home in a flood zone on purpose or on accident. Besides, I don't think Second ever met up with a problem he couldn't buy his way out of.

Save your prayers for all those people who just lost everything they owned.

ummmm, because, according to you, they intentionally bought a FLOOD ZONE HOUSE so they could "lose everything they own" - and then ask for sympathy for their incredible stupidity? Right?

Of course, this does not apply to those in a non-Flood Zone.

News says floodwaters are breaching or overflowing levees, reservoirs.

I'm not even going to reply to this one because I think you need to re-read what I posted. I have no idea what you think you read from your reply.



Which of these parts are you confused about?
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
I'm sure Second's fine. He doesn't seem to be the type that would have bought a home in a flood zone on purpose or on accident. Besides, I don't think Second ever met up with a problem he couldn't buy his way out of.

Save your prayers for all those people who just lost everything they owned.

ummmm, because, according to you, they intentionally bought a FLOOD ZONE HOUSE

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
the type that would have bought a home in a flood zone on purpose or on accident.
Quote:


so they could "lose everything they own"

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
all those people who just lost everything they owned.
Quote:


- and then ask for sympathy for their incredible stupidity? Right?

It kinda looks like I directly quoted you.

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Friday, September 8, 2017 5:39 PM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

news reports over $29 Million now.


I was thinking that part of the good here was that one person was able to provide a conduit for people to funnel support. One that did not reek of corruption, was going to result in less than 5% of funds actually applied to the intended and pledged purpose.

Some people can use the help, even if they were stupid enough to buy in flood zones which flood every year lately.

Four Texas Congressmen disagree with you about the need to help the weak, the elderly, the stupid, and the ignorant from their mistakes.
www.msn.com/en-us/news/politics/these-gop-lawmakers-voted-against-harv
ey-aid-debt-limit-extension/ar-AArw3Mb?li=BBmkt5R&ocid=spartandhp


Whether $29,000,000 or $129,000,000 in charity, it is less than 0.1% of the $180,000,000,000 the Republican Texas governor wants from the Republican President. $15.3 billion is already on the way, but it's just the first installment on a recovery and rebuilding package that could eclipse the more than $110 billion cost to taxpayers of Hurricane Katrina in 2005.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Sunday, September 10, 2017 6:36 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


A Harris County Flood Control District report from two decades ago predicted with "chilling accuracy" reality experienced by thousands of homeowners.

The report, which concluded the aging reservoir system was severely insufficient, proposed a $400 million fix that could have pushed water toward the Houston Ship Channel more quickly. It also suggested buying out properties at risk and regulating development in the area.

None of it happened. The report was mostly forgotten. Over time, land on the western fringes of the reservoirs filled with rows of brick homes.

Today, many sit mangled and destroyed - a preventable outcome that haunts Arthur Storey.

In a surprisingly candid interview with the Dallas paper, Storey, who was flood control director at the time of the 1996 report, said he regretted that he didn't do more to pressure officials to act, and that he was "not smart enough, bold enough to fight the system."

Storey didn't return my call on Friday, perhaps because he was busy tending to his home, which flooded as well. The longtime public servant, who retired from the county in 2015 at age 78, was clear in his assessment to the Dallas paper:

"This, what we have before us, is a massive engineering and governmental failure. I'm both angry about it and embarrassed about it."

Storey's honesty is commendable, and also heartbreaking.

But no one person is to blame for shortsighted policies. Forward-thinking, long-term investment requires buy-in from every level of government.

It also requires something else: Buy-in from you and me.

We, the people served, must acknowledge that, yes, government matters. Yes, there are some things government can solve or just make better.

Start at the polls.

We can't keep electing people openly contemptuous of the government institution that signs their paycheck. Their obstruction is not helpful, or cost-effective. We can't keep demanding ever-lower taxes without regard to the cruel consequences.

www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Harvey-s-l
esson-We-must-make-government-work-12185828.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Sunday, September 10, 2017 2:04 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Is using an elevator during 2 days of a hurricane overhead something recommended? or not prohibited?


https://ca.news.yahoo.com/apos-water-rushing-apos-discovery-000006727.
html

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Sunday, September 10, 2017 2:07 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
A Harris County Flood Control District report from two decades ago predicted with "chilling accuracy" reality experienced by thousands of homeowners.

The report, which concluded the aging reservoir system was severely insufficient, proposed a $400 million fix that could have pushed water toward the Houston Ship Channel more quickly. It also suggested buying out properties at risk and regulating development in the area.

None of it happened. The report was mostly forgotten. Over time, land on the western fringes of the reservoirs filled with rows of brick homes.

Today, many sit mangled and destroyed - a preventable outcome that haunts Arthur Storey.

In a surprisingly candid interview with the Dallas paper, Storey, who was flood control director at the time of the 1996 report, said he regretted that he didn't do more to pressure officials to act, and that he was "not smart enough, bold enough to fight the system."

Storey didn't return my call on Friday, perhaps because he was busy tending to his home, which flooded as well. The longtime public servant, who retired from the county in 2015 at age 78, was clear in his assessment to the Dallas paper:

"This, what we have before us, is a massive engineering and governmental failure. I'm both angry about it and embarrassed about it."

Storey's honesty is commendable, and also heartbreaking.

But no one person is to blame for shortsighted policies. Forward-thinking, long-term investment requires buy-in from every level of government.

It also requires something else: Buy-in from you and me.

We, the people served, must acknowledge that, yes, government matters. Yes, there are some things government can solve or just make better.

Start at the polls.

We can't keep electing people openly contemptuous of the government institution that signs their paycheck. Their obstruction is not helpful, or cost-effective. We can't keep demanding ever-lower taxes without regard to the cruel consequences.

www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Harvey-s-l
esson-We-must-make-government-work-12185828.php


Of all the people to buy a Flood Zone House, this guy did?

W T F??

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Wednesday, September 13, 2017 6:42 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:

Of all the people to buy a Flood Zone House, this guy did?

W T F??

WTF is right. People see that buying a house in a flood zone will save them money, but only 1 person in 100 sees that the eventual flood damage will destroy all the money they "saved" plus 9 times more. I saw a news story this morning about the politicians who can't understand that spending $20 billion now will save them $180 billion in the future:

Too Little Too Late

Harris County Commissioners Court on Tuesday voted to ask the federal government for $17 million to purchase 104 homes at the highest risk of flooding even as more than 1,000 residents have called the Flood Control District in recent days to request buyouts of their Hurricane Harvey flood-damaged homes.

The grant application for Federal Emergency Management Agency buyout funds is part of an annual application to Washington based on flooding in the previous two years, meaning it may not include homes flooded during Harvey.

If approved, officials plan to use the funds to continue the county's slow, piecemeal process to buy and demolish some 3,300 homes located at least 2 feet below the floodplain, also known as "hopelessly deep."

An estimated 136,000 homes and structures across Harris County were flooded as Harvey dumped more than 51 inches of rain in some areas, sending water into some homes for the third time in as many years and sparking increased calls for buyouts from property owners and local officials alike.

Officials estimate nearly 178,000 structures are in the county's floodplain. Only a fifth of the county's 2,450 miles of bayous, creeks and drainage channels can contain a 100-year storm event.

Flood control officials estimate that providing 100-year-flood protection to all the homes in the county - through infrastructure upgrades or buyouts - would cost upward of $20 billion. That seems big, but is not compared to $180 billion for cleanup of Harvey asked for by the Governor of Texas.

www.houstonchronicle.com/news/politics/houston/article/Harris-County-s
eeks-FEMA-help-on-home-buyouts-12193177.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Wednesday, September 13, 2017 8:55 AM

6STRINGJOKER


Where does buying a house in a flood zone save you money?

That sounds like rich people problems to me. Unless you're buying a house with cash, you're going to be forced to purchase very pricy FEMA flood insurance for the life of the loan. In the case of the 30 year loan, this could add $60,000 or more to the price of your home in the long term easily.

And you just know that when you cancel that insurance when the loan is up that next year will be the year the flood of the century hits and destroys everything you own.

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Thursday, September 14, 2017 5:00 AM

SHINYGOODGUY


The Constitution directly is a law FOR Free Speech, and I believe in the Constitution, so there's that.

As I researched secession, I found that the Supreme Court ruled it unconstitutional in the case Texas v. White, although they said that revolution or consent of the States "could lead to a successful secession."
Some may argue otherwise.

Quote:

If there were, how many Democrats would be punished right now after Trump was voted in. Think about it.


The above statement has me scratching my head. What do you mean?

Quote:

Freedom of Speech covers stupidity.


Sure does. We have a president who speaks fluid stupid. But I exercised that
right by calling out Ann Coulter, as did you:

Quote:

Almost everything Reaverfan says is stupid,


Is this a great country or what?


SGG


Quote:

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
Quote:

Originally posted by SHINYGOODGUY:
Why not punishment for trying to secede from the union? Both Ann Coulter and that pastor ARE idiots for saying that (hell, Ann pretty much corners the market in stupidity) and anyone listening to such garbage better hand in their "Get Out of Jail Free" card.



There's no laws against free speech, and I wouldn't want there to be any. There shouldn't be any laws against trying to secede from the Union either, as long as it's done in a peaceful manner.

If there were, how many Democrats would be punished right now after Trump was voted in. Think about it.


Freedom of Speech covers stupidity. Almost everything Reaverfan says is stupid, but I'll defend his right to say it.


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Sunday, September 17, 2017 9:41 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


As support for Ike Dike grows, we still need stubborn boosters

By Lisa Falkenberg September 16, 2017
www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/As-support
-for-Ike-Dike-grows-we-still-need-12203387.php


It’s been a long, hard slog for Bill Merrell since he first proposed the concept of an “Ike Dike” nine years ago. At times, the Texas A&M oceanographer probably could have used his own dike of sorts to keep all the dismissiveness at bay.

Merrell’s fight isn’t over just because political leaders in the weeks after Harvey are calling for action on his concept, but he says it’s heartening to finally see progress. His plan, a “coastal spine” composed of a system of floating gates, is intended to protect Galveston Bay and much of the Houston region from a killer wall of water known as a surge that could accompany a direct-hit monster storm.

“The parade is forming,” the 74-year-old professor said in an interview last week as he sat in a maroon swivel chair in his office overlooking the Galveston channel.

“I learned a long time ago,” he said, referring to his time as a Reagan appointee to the National Science Foundation, “if you’re going to be a hammer, you’ve got to be an anvil, too. People are going to hit back and you can’t take anything personally. Just keep working.”

Early skepticism is perhaps best summed up in a colorful rant by Harris County Commissioner Steve Radack reported by the Chronicle in 2010, when he suggested the closest we’d get to the Ike Dike in his lifetime might be people lining up their cars along the beach.

“Who knows what it’s going to be? Train a bunch of dinosaurs to stand up at a given time?” Radack went on. “Do I believe that man can stop a category 4 or 5 hurricane? The answer is, ‘I don’t believe man can stop a (category) 4 or 5 hurricane unless they pray a lot.’”

Radack wasn’t alone in his resignation about Houston’s vulnerability. Merrell says he once held a similar view himself — that an engineering solution to prevent death and destruction might be well impossible for an area prone to powerful hurricanes. Then came Ike.

Merrell remembers hunkering down with his wife, daughter and grandson for the 2008 hurricane on the second floor of a sturdy 1870 brick-andiron building he owns on The Strand in Galveston. He recalls the helpless feeling as he listened to the 100-mph winds howl, as he watched the streets turn into rivers. The next morning, as he surveyed the destruction around him, he heard about an old friend, a World War II veteran who had lost one hand in combat, who had tied himself to a signpost to avoid being swept out to sea during the storm. When rescuers got to him, he vowed never to weather another hurricane.

A policy ‘of failure’

He was one of the many people Merrell knew, most elderly and poor, who would leave the island and never return. There had to be another way, Merrell thought. He questioned the wisdom of focusing all efforts on recovery and nearly none on prevention.

“Our national policy is one of failure,” he says. “We don’t prevent. We let them hit us in the nose, and we fix it. And we let them do it again. Think about it. If we were doing that for terrorism, we’d throw every damn politician out.”

He says even if a storm is “equal opportunity” in its aim, the poor and elderly — the people lacking in money, insurance and energy — are always the hardest hit. They may escape with their breath, but their lives as they knew them are often wiped out.

“You’re bused up to Dallas or Austin. Your possessions are bulldozed. You only have what you can carry in a sack,” Merrell says. “That’s not how you should treat people.”

Merrell says Ike left him with an “epiphany” that an engineering solution was possible. He sat down and began sketching out an idea for a coastal barrier in Galveston Bay, similar to one he’d seen in the Netherlands.

“The Dutch wouldn’t put up with this,” Merrell says.

It’s become a familiar refrain that poses a provocative question: Why do Texans?

Merrell, a native Texan raised in Bellaire who has lived in Galveston since the 1980s, knows part of the answer: our rugged, risk-taking culture.

“Texans are a pretty resilient lot, but we’re kind of cowboys, too,” he says. “I wish we’d accept the fact that we could reduce risk, rather than just live with risk.”

That’s at the heart of Merrell’s argument — prevention is not only possible, it’s smarter and more cost-effective than simply spending billions of dollars to rebuild things the way they were and expecting different results.

Last week, Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner led a bipartisan group of local officials to demand a “coastal spine” project be federally funded as part of any Harvey recovery package. The estimated cost cited at Turner’s press conference was up to $14 billion, but Merrell believes it’s not more than $8 billion.

Regardless, he says, “it’s going to be cost effective at any cost,” if one accounts for lives and property saved, and the nation’s largest petrochemical complex protected. “Prevention is expensive, but usually, you only do it once.”

He acknowledges the millions of dollars in maintenance costs, which would likely be paid by local or state governments. And he knows there’s plenty of skepticism about whether Congress, outside of the Texas delegation, has the political will to fund the massive project.

Fighting for his idea

Bob Stokes, president of the Galveston Bay Foundation, wrote in an op-ed published in the Chronicle last week that leaders should consider a less expensive option. Others agree, including environmental lawyer Jim Blackburn, who is also concerned about the environmental impact of Merrell’s concept.

“Bill’s done some beautiful work. I think his initial conceptualization was great,” said Blackburn, who is also co-director of the SSPEED Center at Rice University. It stands for the Severe Storm Prediction, Education and Evacuation from Disaster Center. “I just think we should have more detail on it than we do. And I don’t think it’s the best alternative for the money.”

Merrell acknowledges his concept is just that, albeit a concept heavily studied and already tested in other places. He’s not an engineer, and Merrell notes that neither the state nor the federal government has funded a design phase anyway.

He’s simply an academic who, rather than publish an idea and let it wither in the literature, decided to fight for it. He spent years, and plenty of weekends, raising money for research, educating local government leaders over coffee, cheerleading to congressional members, and organizing trips to the Netherlands to observe a real gated barrier system that has worked more than two dozen times.

Merrell says he shares Blackburn’s environmental concerns, but he believes engineering can address those, as well as aesthetics. “Nobody wants to go down and look at a concrete wall and somebody tells you the ocean is on the other side.”

At this point, he and his colleagues have turned over everything they’ve learned to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Merrell says. The agency, which would be tasked with building such a structure, has a broad study going on coastal resiliency.

Merrell credits any progress he has made on the Ike Dike to the colleagues who have helped him and to his own hardheadedness — a characteristic he shares with the man whose endowed chair he holds at A&M: George Mitchell, the late Texas billionaire shale pioneer known as “the father of fracking.”

“He used to say it’s OK to be stubborn if you think you’re right,” Merrell says.

‘Hard decisions’

Of course, it’s not enough to think you’re right. You actually have to be right. Merrell is convinced that he is, and he has persuaded leaders across the region.

Now we need details and careful study to be sure. We need a member of Congress to call on the Corps of Engineers to draft a design.

As Harris County Judge Ed Emmett told me Friday, we need action.

Merrell points to Emmett’s tone these days as proof of how far the Ike Dike has come. He says Emmett is among the elected leaders who initially laughed at the idea. Emmett says he didn’t laugh, only cautioned that there was no way the Obama administration was going to foot the bill.

“I don’t know anyone who ever thought it was a ridiculous idea,” Emmett said. “But it’s time to quit having press conferences and saying, ‘Yeah, we want a coastal barrier,’ and get on with designing it and making the hard decisions.”

He’s right. Merrell gave us a concept that could help protect our region from the monster storm we all know is coming. Now we need someone just as stubborn to make it a reality.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Thursday, September 21, 2017 6:56 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


The shouting would have been 10 times louder and more acrimonious if Houston had to pay 100% rather than only 10% of the cost, with FEMA paying the other 90%.

Stalled debris removal spurs council mess

Council Members want plan now-Now-NOW, despite that being impossible because the council refuses to pay more, while Mayor weighs how city will pay its share of inflated rates. Mayor said FEMA also increased the payment rate for debris removal to $11.69 per cubic yard from $7.69, a move he said would help Houston attract more haulers.

www.houstonchronicle.com/news/politics/houston/article/Mayor-council-c
lash-over-Harvey-debris-removal-12216212.php


By Mike Morris

Crews work to remove debris in the Denver Harbor neighborhood. Mayor Sylvester Turner said higher rates have stymied the city’s cleanup efforts.

City Council members under pressure from constituents to remove the thousands of piles of Hurricane Harvey wreckage on Houston curbs spent Wednesday morning shouting over one another about the topic before delaying a proposal Mayor Sylvester Turner said is needed to meet the city’s goal of trucking 150,000 cubic yards of that debris to landfills each day.

Houston had removed a total of 400,000 cubic yards of debris by Tuesday night, the mayor said, noting the ongoing struggle to draw enough trucks into service. The difficulty is partly because the region is competing with a similar cleanup in Florida and partly because the debris removal rate the city had received through competitive bidding before Harvey proved too low to attract subcontractors.

Turner said he has received approval from the Federal Emergency Management Agency to be reimbursed for 90 percent of the city’s debris removal costs not only at the competitively bid rate, but also at a newly negotiated rate that is 50 percent higher.

That higher rate will entice more subcontractors onto Houston streets, he said, but also will require the city to contribute more to what now is expected to be a $260 million effort.

To that end, council considered allocating an additional $60 million to its main debris removal contract. That the item was delayed one week — over Turner’s strenuous objections — likely will not have a noticeable effect on the cleanup, but it reflected council members’ unrest over a lack of communication about the debris removal effort that had left them flat-footed in answering constituents’ questions.

“There’s a lot of debris everywhere. I know people want it up right now,” Turner said. Still, he said the process may be slower than desired because some truckers have sought even higher rates. “I’m not going to be aggressive in going beyond the FEMA-approved rate. I’m not going to assume an added amount more beyond that when we don’t know where those dollars are going to come from.”

Against a backdrop of intense constituent interest, the discussion quickly went sideways.

District K pushback

Turner already was miffed at questions from Councilmen Jerry Davis and Michael Kubosh about what value prime contractor DRC was providing for its fee when Councilman Larry Green chimed in, seeking information about minority contracting and when trucks were slated to visit neighborhoods in his southwest Houston district.

When Turner declined to answer his queries, Green responded by tagging the item, forcing a one-week delay.

The mayor accused Green of slowing the debris removal process and even suggested the other council members were acting irresponsibly by not voting to override Green’s tag — one of the few powers granted to council members in Houston’s strong-mayor system.

“No one is in a position right now to provide that specificity. There’s debris all over the city in large amounts,” Turner said. “Everybody wants it out of their districts. I got that. But it’s citywide, not just district-specific.”

Green defended his decision and questioned whether a week’s delay would change anything when the current contract is not at risk of expiring or running out of funds. He added that Councilman Dave Martin had been sent crews from the city of San Antonio to clean up Kingwood and that Martin had been receiving detailed information about the debris removed and the next areas to be visited.

Martin retorted that he had better information because he had worked for it, angering his colleagues.

“Maybe that’s some Kingwood stuff that’s happening,” Green said, “but it’s not happening in (District) K.”

Council asks for a plan

Turner was furious, and appeared to question Green’s motives.

“That statement is blatantly false,” he said. “If you’re after something else in terms of subcontracts, say it.”

Other council members kept their tempers in check but joined Green in asking for clearer information.

“Just give us a plan: where you intend to be and when you intend to be there,” Councilman Mike Laster said.

The key focus right now, the mayor said at his post-meeting news conference, is adding trucks to the roads to remove an “unprecedented” amount of debris, then to improve communications.

“I’ve spoken to a number of these contractors and subs, and when I’m talking to the subs the thing they keep asking me (is), ‘Mayor are you going to pay us? Are there going to be any delays?’ I’m telling them, ‘We are going to pay you,’” Turner said after the meeting. “What happened today doesn’t strengthen my hand. It sends the wrong signal.”



The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Friday, September 22, 2017 7:00 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Harvey - and storms to come - raise worries about dam safety

www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Harvey-and-storms-to-come-ra
ise-worries-12219484.php


State climatologist says reservoirs are vulnerable to extreme storms

By Ryan Maye Handy, September 21, 2017 11:07pm

John Nielsen-Gammon cites climate change as culprit.

The state climatologist is warning that Texas dams will become less able to withstand extreme weather events like Hurricane Harvey, which are expected to occur more frequently as the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans warm in coming years.

Dams are designed with a wide margin of safety and are meant to withstand extreme, worst-case scenarios that are never expected to happen. But what stunned state climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon and other weather experts was that Harvey exceeded or matched the preposterous amounts of rainfall that dams in Texas are built to hold back.

“The probable maximum precipitation amount should never be reached,” said Tye Parzybok, the chief meteorologist at Met-Stat, a Colorado-based company that helped Texas calculate the rainfall amounts. “It should never get close to it.”

After Harvey, regulators will have to recalculate the maximum amount of water that dams should be capable of holding back, said Nielsen-Gammon. Climate change means that powerful storms are bringing vastly more rain than they did a century ago, he said.

“I’m not saying they’re unsafe,” said Nielsen-Gammon of Texas’ dams. “They will be less safe than they were designed to be.”

While the relationship between climate change and hurricanes is uncertain, many scientists believe the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere — much of it from burning fossil fuels — is raising global temperatures and warming the oceans, causing more water to evaporate. The buildup of moisture, in turn, is leading to more extreme rains; the record-breaking rainfall brought by Harvey — 51 inches in Harris County — was likely up to 7 percent greater than it would have been a century ago because of climate change, said Nielsen-Gammon.

Local and federal governments, regulators and private industry are now grappling with managing the effects of climate change in designing and constructing buildings, highways, bridges, water and sewer systems and other public works. There is no method, yet, for factoring climate change into the rainfall amounts dams should be capable of withstanding — but that’s something Nielsen-Gammon hopes to change.

On Friday, he will give a presentation in San Marcos at a conference of civil engineers making the case for incorporating climate change into rainfall measurements that are used to design dams, nuclear power plants and other projects that are meant to never fail.

There are 4,008 state-regulated dams in Texas, more than 1,200 of which are considered high risk, meaning their failure would kill people, according to the Association of State Dam Safety Officials. Dams are designed to hold a hypothetical amount of rainfall over a given time period and over a certain area, a calculation called a probable maximum precipitation amount.

The calculations are based on historical rainfall data, which is part of a complex calculation to create a margin of safety. Last year, after nearly 40 years since probable maximum precipitation amounts were first calculated for building dams, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, which oversees dam safety, updated the amounts the state’s dams should be designed to hold.

Harvey has challenged those values, and that should warrant another update that factors in a storm that holds the record for most rainfall in the continental United States, said Nielsen-Gammon.

“Climate scientists expect — based on observations and models — that the maximum is increasing and will continue to increase,” he said. “The frequency of extreme rainfall events is increasing and it’s expected to do that because of climate change.”

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Friday, September 22, 2017 7:11 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Sen. Ted Cruz said Thursday that Congress will make flood control and mitigation a focal point of efforts to rebuild after Hurricane Harvey, citing the Addicks and Barker reservoirs as potential projects that could be targeted for upgrades.

Meanwhile, House Speaker Paul Ryan, who toured the Houston area with Texas Sens. Cruz and John Cornyn and other lawmakers, said the next round of funding for disaster relief could come as soon as next month.

But Ryan, a Wisconsin Republican, did not commit to funding a long-sought coastal barrier that area officials say would protect the region from massive storm surges. Funding for the estimated $12 billion project has been stalled for years in Congress, despite similar walls having been built along other disaster-prone coasts around the country.

The Ike Dike has after Harvey taken on new urgency for many officials and business leaders, who warn a serious hurricane could have devastating effects on the Houston Ship Channel and the national economy.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Friday, September 22, 2017 11:20 AM

6STRINGJOKER


There's always talk about building walls, but no walls ever seem to get built.


Twelve billion seems a bit excessive. Why such a high price? How big of a wall does that buy?

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Friday, September 22, 2017 5:47 PM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
There's always talk about building walls, but no walls ever seem to get built.

The Federal government would not pay for the Galveston Seawall, at least not until 6 thousand died in the 1900 Hurricane and there was literally hundreds of thousands of dollars of damage. I don't expect the Ike Dike until thousands die and a hundred billion dollars of damage. That seems to be how Congress and Texas have always been. They always react too late.

Quote:

Originally posted by 6stringJoker:
Twelve billion seems a bit excessive. Why such a high price? How big of a wall does that buy?

You never know what it will cost to buy out the land owners. Believe me, they're crooked in Texas and if you don't pay their extortionate prices (think Malibu California seashore) the project will be held up in litigation for decades. It would be worse than what will happen for the Texas/Mexico wall along the Rio Grande. And then the construction companies will want to get rich. A lot of One-Percenters will make out like bandits on the Ike Dike project. You can read about the swindles in Wall Street Journal ten or twenty years from now, once the project is finished, long after some huge hurricanes have ruined Houston.

www.wsj.com/articles/SB124407051124382899

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Friday, September 22, 2017 7:56 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SECOND:
Harvey - and storms to come - raise worries about dam safety

www.houstonchronicle.com/business/article/Harvey-and-storms-to-come-ra
ise-worries-12219484.php


State climatologist says reservoirs are vulnerable to extreme storms

By Ryan Maye Handy, September 21, 2017 11:07pm

John Nielsen-Gammon cites climate change as culprit.

The state climatologist is warning that Texas dams will become less able to withstand extreme weather events like Hurricane Harvey, which are expected to occur more frequently as the Earth’s atmosphere and oceans warm in coming years.

Dams are designed with a wide margin of safety and are meant to withstand extreme, worst-case scenarios that are never expected to happen. But what stunned state climatologist John Nielsen-Gammon and other weather experts was that Harvey exceeded or matched the preposterous amounts of rainfall that dams in Texas are built to hold back.

“The probable maximum precipitation amount should never be reached,” said Tye Parzybok, the chief meteorologist at Met-Stat, a Colorado-based company that helped Texas calculate the rainfall amounts. “It should never get close to it.”

After Harvey, regulators will have to recalculate the maximum amount of water that dams should be capable of holding back, said Nielsen-Gammon. Climate change means that powerful storms are bringing vastly more rain than they did a century ago, he said.

“I’m not saying they’re unsafe,” said Nielsen-Gammon of Texas’ dams. “They will be less safe than they were designed to be.”

While the relationship between climate change and hurricanes is uncertain, many scientists believe the increasing concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere — much of it from burning fossil fuels — is raising global temperatures and warming the oceans, causing more water to evaporate. The buildup of moisture, in turn, is leading to more extreme rains; the record-breaking rainfall brought by Harvey — 51 inches in Harris County — was likely up to 7 percent greater than it would have been a century ago because of climate change, said Nielsen-Gammon.

Local and federal governments, regulators and private industry are now grappling with managing the effects of climate change in designing and constructing buildings, highways, bridges, water and sewer systems and other public works. There is no method, yet, for factoring climate change into the rainfall amounts dams should be capable of withstanding — but that’s something Nielsen-Gammon hopes to change.

On Friday, he will give a presentation in San Marcos at a conference of civil engineers making the case for incorporating climate change into rainfall measurements that are used to design dams, nuclear power plants and other projects that are meant to never fail.

There are 4,008 state-regulated dams in Texas, more than 1,200 of which are considered high risk, meaning their failure would kill people, according to the Association of State Dam Safety Officials. Dams are designed to hold a hypothetical amount of rainfall over a given time period and over a certain area, a calculation called a probable maximum precipitation amount.

The calculations are based on historical rainfall data, which is part of a complex calculation to create a margin of safety. Last year, after nearly 40 years since probable maximum precipitation amounts were first calculated for building dams, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, which oversees dam safety, updated the amounts the state’s dams should be designed to hold.

Harvey has challenged those values, and that should warrant another update that factors in a storm that holds the record for most rainfall in the continental United States, said Nielsen-Gammon.

“Climate scientists expect — based on observations and models — that the maximum is increasing and will continue to increase,” he said. “The frequency of extreme rainfall events is increasing and it’s expected to do that because of climate change.”

Golly, almost 4 inches more than 100 years ago. Because only 47 inches in 48 hours would have been completely different.

Why does this sound like attempts to distract from Obama's dereliction of the dams since 2009 when those dams were ID'd as among the 6 worst in the Nation, from all 57 States? Or was Bush President from 2009 to 2017?

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Friday, September 22, 2017 10:30 PM

6STRINGJOKER


LOL all 57 states.


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Saturday, September 23, 2017 7:40 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:

Golly, almost 4 inches more than 100 years ago. Because only 47 inches in 48 hours would have been completely different.

Why does this sound like attempts to distract from Obama's dereliction of the dams since 2009 when those dams were ID'd as among the 6 worst in the Nation, from all 57 States? Or was Bush President from 2009 to 2017?

It is Congress, not the President, that provides the money for fixing dams. It is not Presidential dereliction, but Congressional dereliction of duty. If Congress won't provide the money, the dams don't get fixed. If you can show me money Congress authorized for fixing dams that a President refused to spend, then you have shown that it is the President's fault that the dams are not fixed. But it has never happened where a President declared that Congress is wasting money on dams and refused to fix one. It has always been Congress not paying for repairs. I can recall Congress shutting down the government while Obama was President. Congress wouldn't pay for anything, not just dams.

By golly, you have a point, but it is that Texas only learns a small part of the lessons taught by major storms. From today's Houston Chronicle about Hurricane Harvey:

I remembered a warning from the post-script of the only book-length account of Indianola’s colorful history.

“In time,” the late Malsch wrote, “new catastrophes comparable to those of Indianola in 1875 and 1886, of Galveston in 1900, of Corpus Christi in 1919, of hurricane Carla in 1961, to name only a few, will overwhelm parts of the Texas coast. When? Who knows? One can only say with certainty that they will come.”

Malsch chided coastal Texans for ignoring “the examples [Indianolans] set and the lessons they were harshly taught.” More than 40 years after he penned those words, his warning goes unheeded [by Congress].

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Saturday, September 23, 2017 2:28 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Golly, almost 4 inches more than 100 years ago. Because only 47 inches in 48 hours would have been completely different.

Why does this sound like attempts to distract from Obama's dereliction of the dams since 2009 when those dams were ID'd as among the 6 worst in the Nation, from all 57 States? Or was Bush President from 2009 to 2017?

It is Congress, not the President, that provides the money for fixing dams. It is not Presidential dereliction, but Congressional dereliction of duty. If Congress won't provide the money, the dams don't get fixed. If you can show me money Congress authorized for fixing dams that a President refused to spend, then you have shown that it is the President's fault that the dams are not fixed. But it has never happened where a President declared that Congress is wasting money on dams and refused to fix one. It has always been Congress not paying for repairs. I can recall Congress shutting down the government while Obama was President. Congress wouldn't pay for anything, not just dams.

By golly, you have a point, but it is that Texas only learns a small part of the lessons taught by major storms. From today's Houston Chronicle about Hurricane Harvey:

I remembered a warning from the post-script of the only book-length account of Indianola’s colorful history.

“In time,” the late Malsch wrote, “new catastrophes comparable to those of Indianola in 1875 and 1886, of Galveston in 1900, of Corpus Christi in 1919, of hurricane Carla in 1961, to name only a few, will overwhelm parts of the Texas coast. When? Who knows? One can only say with certainty that they will come.”

Malsch chided coastal Texans for ignoring “the examples [Indianolans] set and the lessons they were harshly taught.” More than 40 years after he penned those words, his warning goes unheeded [by Congress].

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

OK. Obama had 2009 to 2011 to get those dams repaired, after they were identified in 2009. Bobo and 2 chambers of Congress, all under Democrap control. But instead, their priority was to destroy, not build.

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Sunday, September 24, 2017 7:15 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:

OK. Obama had 2009 to 2011 to get those dams repaired, after they were identified in 2009. Bobo and 2 chambers of Congress, all under Democrap control. But instead, their priority was to destroy, not build.

Obama could not spend more on the Army Corps of Engineering projects, such as rebuilding dams, because the deficit was soaring in those years. You remember why, too, don't you? Tax collection was down, which had everything to do with a previous President crashing the economy. You could look at the graph about the growing deficit: https://fred.stlouisfed.org/series/GFDEGDQ188S

I noticed you got a serious case of amnesia in 2008 for everything wrong in government that happened before Obama, plus you started posting your delusions about Obama being the cause of the crash in the economy. In 2017 Obama is now the cause of the dams not being rebuilt. You're consistent over the years, but your political theorizing doesn't leave any room for Congressional Republicans being at fault in even the tiniest way:
http://fireflyfans.net/mthreaduser.aspx?u=28350
http://fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?bid=18&tid=35735&mid=65659
4#656594


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Sunday, September 24, 2017 9:42 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
OK. Obama had 2009 to 2011 to get those dams repaired, after they were identified in 2009. Bobo and 2 chambers of Congress, all under Democrap control. But instead, their priority was to destroy, not build.

Obama could not spend more on the Army Corps of Engineering projects, such as rebuilding dams, because the deficit was soaring in those years. You remember why, too, don't you?

Yep. Rock-The-Vote Democraps wasted no time enacting a budget to crash the economy, bloating spending to plummet revenues, and Obama's ACORN bubble popped, and then, like I pointed out, from Nov 2008 to Mar 2009 Bobo worked feverishly to further the economic trashing that his Libtard bozos already had under way.
Quote:


I noticed you got a serious case of amnesia in 2008 for everything wrong in government that happened before Obama, plus you started posting your delusions about Obama being the cause of the crash in the economy. In 2017 Obama is now the cause of the dams not being rebuilt. You're consistent over the years, but your political theorizing doesn't leave any room for Congressional Republicans being at fault in even the tiniest way:
http://fireflyfans.net/mthreaduser.aspx?u=28350
http://fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?bid=18&tid=35735&mid=65659
4#656594



I'm certain that I faulted Congressional Republicans for not stridently protecting Americans from bloated debts, deficits, spending, ACORN practices well before Bobo was elected.
But the electorate continues to choose RINOs, and even my state is guilty of it.

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Sunday, September 24, 2017 11:57 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:

I'm certain that I faulted Congressional Republicans for not stridently protecting Americans from bloated debts, deficits, spending, ACORN practices well before Bobo was elected.
But the electorate continues to choose RINOs, and even my state is guilty of it.

Finding fault will get you nothing in the real world.

Election after election, the same Republican electorate keeps returning the same old Republicans in name only to Congress. It is their fault for not learning, yet whining about the results. Similarly, Republicans I know blame the government for hurricane Harvey flooding of their homes, never taking personal responsibility for their bad decisions that I have shown seven Republicans, so far, where their homes are on the flood map. They don’t grasp easily the concept of buying a building in a flood zone means you will get flooded. Their action ought to be buying a different house at an elevation provably above floods. And not taking word of mouth that the house can’t flood. Similarly, their action should be to elect a different Congressman who is provably a "pure" Republican. And not taking the future Congressman's word as sincere and without intention to deceive you. It is that straight forward.

Here is the flood map: www.harriscountyfemt.org/

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

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Sunday, September 24, 2017 12:47 PM

6STRINGJOKER


Well... voting in somebody that isn't lying to you is a tough job for anybody.


I agree with you about the flood zone thing, for the most part. It all depends on the circumstances surrounding the issue though. It's possible that a few of them didn't know what they were getting into.

I'm in a flood zone. The house was sold as-is, I didn't buy with a mortgage, and the bank selling it to me surely wasn't going to volunteer that information. It was bad news when I found that out from neighbors after I bought the house and even worse when I had to deal with it first hand.

I thought I had done my due diligence. Any of the other cities I had been looking at had this information listed on their tax property cards. So did mine, actually, but it wasn't correct information. (I actually got quite a bit shaved off of my property taxes when I had them fix this. Since I don't plan on moving any time soon and by devaluing my home wherever I could I've benefited from an average tax savings of around $1,250 every year since I've been here.)

I'm not considered a major risk. It's actually just barely considered a flood zone and the way things have been trending with the ditch work they've done in the area I might actually be outside of it one day. The problem is that if I lose power or the sump pump goes out and it's been raining a lot, my basement will flood. I actually had damn near gotten hypothermia around 4 years back when the pump went out and I was knee deep in freezing November waters replacing it.

Now that I know, I have a spare pump and parts on hand as well as a generator. I plan to build a complete second pump system with a battery backup and maybe even buy a Generac system if and when money allows. I figure in the mean time I'll just replace my pump every 6-7 years just to be on the safe side.


I still blame myself for the situation though. I was far too focused on some things and not focused enough on other things when I was buying. I know a lot more now and wouldn't make the same mistake again, but for now all I can do is prepare for the worst as best I can so I don't have to worry about it all of the time.

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Sunday, September 24, 2017 2:08 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I'm certain that I faulted Congressional Republicans for not stridently protecting Americans from bloated debts, deficits, spending, ACORN practices well before Bobo was elected.
But the electorate continues to choose RINOs, and even my state is guilty of it.

Finding fault will get you nothing in the real world.

Election after election, the same Republican electorate keeps returning the same old Republicans in name only to Congress. It is their fault for not learning, yet whining about the results. Similarly, Republicans I know blame the government for hurricane Harvey flooding of their homes, never taking personal responsibility for their bad decisions that I have shown seven Republicans, so far, where their homes are on the flood map. They don’t grasp easily the concept of buying a building in a flood zone means you will get flooded. Their action ought to be buying a different house at an elevation provably above floods. And not taking word of mouth that the house can’t flood. Similarly, their action should be to elect a different Congressman who is provably a "pure" Republican. And not taking the future Congressman's word as sincere and without intention to deceive you. It is that straight forward.

Here is the flood map: www.harriscountyfemt.org/

Agreed all around.
Very few of the candidates I vote for win, but I still vote for the best candidate.

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