REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

Shout out to Second - hope you are doing well

POSTED BY: G
UPDATED: Sunday, December 10, 2017 10:02
SHORT URL:
VIEWED: 4408
PAGE 5 of 5

Friday, December 1, 2017 7:55 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Yeah. Sucks for the people who bought those homes though. They're screwed. Largest purchase most people will ever make in their lives and they're worthless now whether they were flooded or not.

The houses are valuable if raised.



I'm sure that you wouldn't think twice about doing it. If it were that easy and affordable for the other 99% out there, I'm sure they would have done it.

If that's really a solution, than what's your beef in this entire thread? FEMA should have just raised everybodies houses before something like this happened and they wouldn't be paying so much now.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, December 1, 2017 9:03 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Yeah. Sucks for the people who bought those homes though. They're screwed. Largest purchase most people will ever make in their lives and they're worthless now whether they were flooded or not.

The houses are valuable if raised.



I'm sure that you wouldn't think twice about doing it. If it were that easy and affordable for the other 99% out there, I'm sure they would have done it.

If that's really a solution, than what's your beef in this entire thread? FEMA should have just raised everybodies houses before something like this happened and they wouldn't be paying so much now.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

You did not click the link, did you? www.homeadvisor.com/cost/foundations/raise-a-foundation/

How Much Does It Cost To Raise A House?
National Average $5,346
Typical Range $2,630 - $8,062
Low End $865
High End $14,000

$14,000 to raise a house does not seem like too much money to avoid $50,000 in flood damage.

Similarly, $61 billion in construction costs to prevent future flooding in Houston does not seem too much money to avoid another $180 billion repair bill from future flood damage. (Harvey will cost that much.) Hurricane Harvey will not be the last hurricane, which means that not spending the money to fix the flooding problem is a very wrong and very expensive decision. It is like letting a kitchen fire burn down the whole house because a fire extinguisher seems too expensive.
www.amazon.com/Kidde-21005779-Fire-Extinguisher-160CI/dp/B077J45KXK/

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, December 1, 2017 11:43 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK


Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Quote:

Originally posted by second:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Yeah. Sucks for the people who bought those homes though. They're screwed. Largest purchase most people will ever make in their lives and they're worthless now whether they were flooded or not.

The houses are valuable if raised.



I'm sure that you wouldn't think twice about doing it. If it were that easy and affordable for the other 99% out there, I'm sure they would have done it.

If that's really a solution, than what's your beef in this entire thread? FEMA should have just raised everybodies houses before something like this happened and they wouldn't be paying so much now.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

You did not click the link, did you? www.homeadvisor.com/cost/foundations/raise-a-foundation/

How Much Does It Cost To Raise A House?
National Average $5,346
Typical Range $2,630 - $8,062
Low End $865
High End $14,000

$14,000 to raise a house does not seem like too much money to avoid $50,000 in flood damage.

Similarly, $61 billion in construction costs to prevent future flooding in Houston does not seem too much money to avoid another $180 billion repair bill from future flood damage. (Harvey will cost that much.) Hurricane Harvey will not be the last hurricane, which means that not spending the money to fix the flooding problem is a very wrong and very expensive decision. It is like letting a kitchen fire burn down the whole house because a fire extinguisher seems too expensive.
www.amazon.com/Kidde-21005779-Fire-Extinguisher-160CI/dp/B077J45KXK/



Spoken like somebody who has all the money in the world.

I don't think I can name a single person who has $14,000 just lying around. Hindsight being 20/20 it's easy to say they all should have raised the houses on their land before the floods. Unfortunately, real life gets in the way of that for the 99%.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, December 1, 2017 12:21 PM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:

Spoken like somebody who has all the money in the world.

I don't think I can name a single person who has $14,000 just lying around. Hindsight being 20/20 it's easy to say they all should have raised the houses on their land before the floods. Unfortunately, real life gets in the way of that for the 99%.

Parts of Harris County were hit by 500-year flood three times in three years, but everywhere I go, Texans think it cannot happen again in their lifetime. That could be amnesia, but I think that is really a failure of imagination, not a failure to have enough money. Real life means not forgetting that 7,000 people died in Galveston from a hurricane. Then Galveston built a seawall to keep the future death tolls lower. Except when Galveston expanded westward beyond the seawall, it did not extend the wall to new areas. And you know what? People died. Hurricane season ended today, but it will be back next year.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 6:34 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Harvey-cou
ld-gut-state-budget-by-1-billion-12408699.php


Senate hearing reveals costs rising, only $20 million left in disaster fund

Senate leaders warned Tuesday that Hurricane Harvey could put a billion-dollar hole in Texas' budget, an ever-growing number that could affect how much money is available for other state programs.

Only $20 million remains in the state disaster-assistance fund, Senate Finance Committee Chair Jane Nelson said at a public hearing Tuesday on the status of hurricane recovery efforts.

"Our state costs are escalating," said Nelson, R-Flower Mound. "We need to be judicious. ... If we, God forbid, had another disaster in the next 18 months, where would we get the money?"

The Legislature will not convene in a regular session until January 2019.

The state has spent more than $1.7 billion so far in state funds, along with billions in federal assistance, according to updated numbers provided to the committee on Tuesday. Legislative Budget Board officials said as much as $2 billion in additional state funds may be needed in 2019 to cover hurricane-related school costs.

The committee also grilled Texas Land Commissioner George P. Bush, who is charge of housing relief programs, about growing complaints from storm victims about the slow pace of repairs and temporary housing.

Their message: Speed things up.

Bush said 8,702 households have immediate needs, out of 890,000 Texans overall who have applied for federal disaster relief - including housing assistance.

Bush said that $5 billion in assistance approved by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development may not arrive in Texas until the fall of 2018, a delay attributed to rules that must be written and approved in Washington.

State Sen. Lois Kolkhorst, R-Brenham, whose district was hard hit by Harvey, acknowledged that the road to recovery from the nation's most destructive storm "will be a long, long road."

Bush said that $1 billion in immediate state funding would allow temporary housing assistance to be speeded up. Those funds could be fully reimbursed later by the federal government, he said.

State Sen. Royce West, D-Dallas, suggested those funds could be borrowed quickly from the state's Rainy Day Fund - a savings account - to expedite the housing recovery for thousands of Texans, some of whom are living in tents.

"We'd need to have a special session" to approve that borrowing, West said, drawing silence from other committee members.

Gov. Greg Abbott has said he does not want to call a special session and intends to allow state agencies to spend into their 2019 budgets to pay the storm bills, with repayment by the Legislature in 2019.

Nelson said the state's costs from Harvey are going to climb.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, December 6, 2017 6:55 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


County judge asks: "Where's the action on Harvey flooding?"
The state and feds are dragging their feet on flooding
www.houstonchronicle.com/news/columnists/falkenberg/article/County-jud
ge-Where-s-the-action-on-Harvey-12408438.php


Forget the lip service on flooding reforms after Hurricane Harvey. Where’s the action?

This is a question you’d expect a flooded homeowner to ask. But even Harris County Judge Ed Emmett is asking it, despite the fact that he and his fellow commissioners passed some significant new flood regulations this week. The regulations, including more stringent elevation requirements in floodways in unincorporated areas, are progress, no doubt.

But compared to the most devastating flooding event in American history, they’re a drop in the bucket.

Emmett will be the first to admit this. Instead of crowing about the reforms, he focused on what is not getting done. That includes many of the items on his list of priorities, from building a third reservoir, which has wide support, to expensive home buyouts in flood-prone areas, which will be among the hardest to achieve.

“There are so many,” he said of the buyouts. “It’s costly, it’s time-consuming and it’s agonizing. Not everyone wants to be bought out, but a lot of people do.”

He says he’s in the process of reorganizing his staff to make sure they’re staying on top of flooding reforms he has proposed.

He said many of the proposals require action from the state and federal governments, which aren’t moving fast enough.

“I’m probably within a month of being really agitated,” Emmett said. “But I know the process has to work.”

He pointed out how state leaders have refused to dip into the $10 billion rainy day fund, a state savings account, but said they assured people they would instead opt for the Legislative Budget Board to redirect funding from state agencies and then repay it with legislative approval in 2019.

But that hasn’t happened.

Just this week in a Senate committee meeting, a Dallas senator suggested a special legislative session to dip into rainy day funds to help thousands of Texans, some living in tents, with immediate housing needs. The comment drew silence from his fellow committee members, the Houston Chronicle’s Mike Ward reported.

Emmett is frustrated that Gov. Greg Abbott won’t consider using rainy day funds at least to jump start a third reservoir, which has wide bipartisan support in the area affected by Harvey.

“I don’t know why the state won’t go ahead and fund that,” he said, estimating the cost around $500 million. “That’s five percent of the rainy day fund. That’s all.”

Gov. Abbott has cracked the window on the idea of a special legislative session, required to use rainy day funds, but has reiterated that he doesn’t want to tap the savings account until the total costs of the storm are known.

At one point, Abbott claimed Houston had enough funds for hurricane relief and then relented a bit by showing up in Houston in September with a $50 million check in state funds for Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner.

But Emmett says he’s perplexed as to why the state hasn’t done more to help other areas affected by the storm, including unincorporated Harris County.

“My gosh, if I were governor, and I’m sitting here on $11 billion dollars by the time they get to the next legislative session,” Emmett said, referring to the rainy day fund. “How good a politician would I be to say, ‘You know what, Southeast Texas, here’s $2 billion. I’m going to solve a lot of your problems.’ ”

He’s concerned that the governor seems to view Harvey relief as a local issue. On some level, it is. But it’s a local issue that affects a region that serves as the economic engine of the state, and a fifth of the state’s population.

Harvey isn’t just a Houston problem. It’s a Texas problem. It’s a U.S. problem.

It’s understandable that state leaders are waiting to see how much Congress will appropriate in federal funds before deciding how much the state should chip in.

But federal funding is another mess — another area of lip service and no action.

The Chronicle’s Kevin Diaz reported last week that the White House’s $44 billion storm relief package, a far cry from the $61 billion Abbott has asked for, is being held hostage in a partisan war over an end-of-year spending package that has deteriorated to the point of a possible government shutdown.

Jim Blackburn, a veteran environmental lawyer who will be a keynote speaker at Wednesday night’s Chronicle-sponsored symposium “Greater Houston After Harvey,” said he was encouraged by the small action county commissioners took, but frustrated by the glacial pace of officials approaching an epic problem.

“I don’t get a sense of urgency about this problem,” said Blackburn, co-director of Rice University’s Severe Storm Prediction, Education and Evacuation from Disasters (SSPEED) Center.

Blackburn praised Emmett for being the most vocal official on the issue, and calling flooding his No. 1 priority, but the lawyer questioned why other officials aren’t charging ahead.

“I hear it’s the No. 1 priority,” Blackburn said. “I would suggest it’s the only priority. We’ve got to get this issue done with. We haven’t been successful in the past. And I think it’s wrongheaded to think we can continue doing what we’ve been doing.”

No, we can’t. What we’ve been doing cost the Houston region lives, and jobs and thousands of homes, and total losses that could reach $200 billion, making it the costliest natural disaster in U.S. history.

As expensive as that sounds, a lagging recovery and failure to prevent damage that will surely come in a future storm will cost infinitely more.



The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Thursday, December 7, 2017 7:57 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


Pictures of Houston house being raised above future flood level

www.houstonchronicle.com/business/real-estate/article/Harvey-damage-co
uld-force-hundreds-to-raise-their-12411490.php


More than 1,600 Houston property owners who flooded during Hurricane Harvey likely will be forced to elevate their homes if they want to continue living there.

The city's Public Works Department is preparing to notify property owners in floodplains that their structures have been declared "substantially damaged" and will require additional repairs to comply with current building codes. For most, that will mean physically raising their homes, a pricey upgrade that can cost well more than $150,000.

The 1,611 letters that start going out this month will be the "first batch" for properties identified as damaged so severely that repairs would cost more than 50 percent of the market value of the structure, not including the land.

The department said 30,523 structures that lie within Houston's 100-year floodplain or floodway took on some flooding during Harvey. The substantial damage designation applies only to properties in these areas, which are spread throughout the city.

The department does not have a final tally of properties that will be classified that way.

"Houston Public Works is still working with FEMA on that," the department said in an email, referring to the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

While some Houstonians who receive the letters may already have been planning to raise their homes, others may not have the resources to elevate.

"The expense is tremendous," said Mayor Pro Tem Ellen Cohen, who represents District C, which includes Meyerland, Braeswood Place and other affected neighborhoods. "It's difficult, but there are going to be decisions that have to be made."

All property types

The properties in the first batch determined to have substantial damage are all single-family homes, but the designation could apply to any type of property, according to Public Works.

FEMA said it would not disclose the affected homes' addresses due to privacy laws.

Longtime Meyerland resident Ed Wolff received his letter Tuesday. He said he requested the substantial-damage designation because he needed it to be eligible for a mitigation loan from the Small Business Association to elevate his house, which flooded for the third time in three years.

The cost to repair or replace the home is 70 percent of the structure's value, according to the letter.

All properties declared substantially damaged will be flagged by the city's permitting staff. Requests for building permits will require evidence the home is compliant with the city's elevation standard, which is 12 inches above the base flood elevation in a 100-year floodplain, or 18 inches in a floodway, the letter explains.

"The letter of substantial damage is a tool for the city of Houston to ensure people are not repairing houses that really shouldn't be repaired," said Wolff, who works in real estate and has been consulting with city officials on Harvey-related matters.

Wolff plans to elevate his house six feet, three feet above the water line from Harvey.

The cost to elevate the 3,500-square-foot structure, which was built in 1965, will be more than $270,000.

After everything is done, the project will still be cheaper than building a new house, he said.

Some homeowners may be eligible for up to $30,000 in federal funds to help with the cost of raising the home.

Appeal, buyout options

Arkitektura Development Inc., a Kemah-based firm that specializes in elevating houses, said it typically costs between $65 and $70 per square foot to raise a home.

Since Harvey, the company has taken orders to elevate houses in neighborhoods including Meyerland, Linkwood, Westbury, Bellaire, Maplewood, Nottingham Forest, Willow Meadows and Braes Heights, said owner Phillip Contreras.

In most cases the homeowners have flooded at least twice. Some have been inundated as many as five times.

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, December 8, 2017 6:36 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


A federal judge in Houston has denied an emergency request by three Texas churches to apply for relief money to rebuild sanctuaries damaged during Hurricane Harvey in a case that tests the constitutional boundaries separating church and state.

U.S. District Judge Gray H. Miller, who has presided over the case for one week, denied the churches' motion Thursday for a temporary injunction to access Federal Emergency Management Agency funds. The case will proceed to trial on the question of whether nonprofit groups affiliated with a religious organization can use federal money to rebuild structures where community aid is provided in the same location where religion is practiced.

Miller's colleague U.S. District Judge Keith P. Ellison withdrew from the high-profile lawsuit last week. . . .

"The Court correctly recognized that the Constitution does not require the government to grant churches tax dollars to rebuild their places of worship," he said. " This ruling protects the freedom of conscience of taxpayers by ensuring that they do not have to subsidize religions to which they do not subscribe. It also protects the religious freedom of churches, because governmental funding can result in improper governmental interference in religious matters."

Judge Ellison had given the government a Dec. 1 deadline to respond to the churches' request to apply for these relief funds, which have been denied in the past to religious groups seeking to rebuild houses of worship.

www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/article/New-judge-denies-c
hurches-emergency-FEMA-request-12412979.php


The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Saturday, December 9, 2017 6:05 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


The House of the Future Is Elevated

www.citylab.com/design/2017/12/the-house-of-the-future-is-elevated/540
327
/

On December 5, Harris County, which surrounds the City of Houston, approved an overhaul of its flood rules, expanding them from 100-year floodplains—which have a 1 percent change of flooding in a given year—to 500-year floodplains. The new rules (which don’t apply inside Houston city limits) will compel people building houses in some areas to elevate them up to eight feet higher than before.

“We had 30,000 houses that flooded” from Harvey, said county engineer John Blount, who put forward the rule changes. Before the floodwaters even subsided, hundreds of county employees fanned out to survey the damage. “We went to every one of those houses and figured out how much water got in them, and then we did a statistical analysis,” Blount said.

The data was geocoded, factoring in location and neighborhood conditions, and one result was the increased elevation rule. (The county is also buying out 200 of the most vulnerable homes and hopes to buy out thousands more, but those represent a small fraction of the homes inside the floodplain.)

Harris County’s new rules are the most stringent flood-related development restrictions anywhere in the United States, according to Blount. If a future Harvey-sized deluge comes, almost all the homes in the area will be safe, he said: “Had that same event happened, at the same location but [with houses] built to the new standard, 95 percent or more would not have flooded.” . . .

More Harveys are coming: As my colleague Robinson Meyer reported, a new MIT study concludes that Harvey-scale flooding in Texas is six times as likely now as it was in the late 20th century, and will only get more likely as this century wears on. . . .

For homeowners wanting to minimize the risk of getting inundated, “by far the best thing to do is elevate,” said Reichel.

Unfortunately, doing so is uncommon in the South. “Everyone still builds on a slab,” said Mike Barcik, senior engineer for technical services at the Southface Institute, a sustainable building nonprofit in Atlanta.

Nationwide, according to Census data, 59 percent of new single-family homes are “slab-on-grade,” as it’s known in the construction industry. The technique is pretty much what it sounds like: Concrete is poured into a mold set shallowly into the ground, forming a slab several inches thick. Because a ground freeze can crack the slab, the method is mainly used in warmer climates. It’s straightforward and cheap. But it results in a house with a low elevation, which is obviously not ideal in a flood zone. “I don’t understand why you would ever build a house on a slab on grade that could be in a flood-prone area,” Barcik said. . . .

John Jacob, director of the Texas coastal watershed program at Texas A&M University, believes that elevating homes is essential if Houston wants to solve its water quandary. “Water seeks the low spots; we need to seek the high spots. It is just that simple,” he wrote in a post-Harvey blog post. “Elevation needs to be our watchword. Elevation needs to be the metric by which we gauge all new development as well as all redevelopment.”

Jacob himself lives in an older city neighborhood called Eastwood, on a high lot, in a house perched above a four-foot crawl space. The house is new, built in 2015. He estimated that elevating it added $5,000 to a cost of about $300,000—not nothing, but a lot less than he would have paid 10 or 20 years down the line.

Jacobs said the house doesn’t look strange because of the added height. “It’s not like houses on stilts. You’ve got vegetation and those kinds of things. It doesn’t look too weird at all.”

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Sunday, December 10, 2017 10:02 AM

SECOND

The Joss Whedon script for Serenity, where Wash lives, is Serenity-190pages.pdf at www.mediafire.com/folder/1uwh75oa407q8/Firefly


www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Build-floo
d-rebuild-flood-insurance-s-12413056.php


Subsidies have helped lure generations of homeowners into properties that trap them in a cycle of building, flooding and rebuilding. Henry Thompson and his wife, for example, bought their home not far from Cypress Creek three years ago. They knew the neighborhood northwest of Houston flooded, but the cost of flood insurance was so low — about $400 a year — they bought anyway.

Then Harvey swept 2 feet of water under their threshold, forcing them to live on the second floor for the past three months with a microwave, an electric skillet and two young children. They want to sell but can’t imagine they’ll find a buyer, leaving them with little choice but to cash the insurance check, rebuild and wait for the waters to rise again.

“You’re stuck,” Thompson said. “That’s the only way to put it.”

The flood insurance program is $20 billion in debt now, and it likely will require more cash next year from taxpayers, who already have bailed out the program 16 times in 25 years totaling $42 billion in loans and grants. Those figures don’t include the hundreds of billions of dollars in disaster relief not covered by flood insurance.

They also don’t capture the financial stress and anxieties of families who have sunk life savings into homes that have become all but worthless. Eight doors down from the Thompsons, Jeremy and Amber Hill and their four boys, ages 3 to 12, find themselves in a similar bind. Their home has flooded twice in the six years they’ve owned it. They can’t sell. But they can’t stay, either.

“The kids,” said Jeremy Hill, “have a panic attack every time it rains.”

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

YOUR OPTIONS

NEW POSTS TODAY

USERPOST DATE

OTHER TOPICS

DISCUSSIONS
Where are the democrats? Waiting for the Deep State to get rid of Trump?
Mon, December 11, 2017 14:07 - 20 posts
Accusing Someone You Disagree With Of Being A Russian Troll Is Admitting You Have No Argument
Mon, December 11, 2017 13:53 - 83 posts
Bomb Exploded Times Square
Mon, December 11, 2017 13:13 - 5 posts
Putin Orders Withdrawal Of Russian Troops During Surprise Syria Visit
Mon, December 11, 2017 11:23 - 1 posts
Game Companies are Morons.
Mon, December 11, 2017 10:27 - 45 posts
Male Role Models
Mon, December 11, 2017 10:25 - 108 posts
New Alabama Motto Contest
Mon, December 11, 2017 08:09 - 6 posts
A thread for Democrats Only
Sun, December 10, 2017 23:25 - 236 posts
In the garden, and RAIN!!!!
Sun, December 10, 2017 16:12 - 265 posts
Shout out to Second - hope you are doing well
Sun, December 10, 2017 10:02 - 210 posts
Trump not invited to Paris December climate change summit for now, says France
Sun, December 10, 2017 08:59 - 5 posts
Trump moves US Embassy to Jerusalem
Sun, December 10, 2017 01:16 - 28 posts

FFF.NET SOCIAL