REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

The Recipe Thread

POSTED BY: JEWELSTAITEFAN
UPDATED: Thursday, September 24, 2020 23:50
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Saturday, July 18, 2020 3:01 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


So, in sum, of the white beans the specialty flageolet were phenomenal, but because of price and availability my first choice are great northern (and I'll avoid navy beans unless there's nothing else). And of the brown or speckled beans the pink pearl were spectacular, but again, due to price and availability my first choice are pinto with cranberry behind them.

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Saturday, July 18, 2020 1:07 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


You make me wonder about bean soup, which I have never made from scratch. Any idea what to use for the sauce, or broth?

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Saturday, July 18, 2020 5:52 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Ham and bean soup is usually made with great northern or other white bean. (My personal preference is great northern.) This is a pretty typical recipe.

https://www.allrecipes.com/recipe/17628/basic-ham-and-bean-soup/
1 pound dry great Northern beans
8 cups water
½ teaspoon salt
1 ham hock
1 cup chopped carrots
½ stalk celery, chopped
1 cup chopped onion
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 teaspoon mustard powder
2 each bay leaves
2 cups chopped ham
½ teaspoon ground white pepper

Step 1
Rinse the beans, sorting out any broken or discolored ones. In a large pot over high heat, bring the water to a boil. Add the salt and the beans and remove from heat. Let beans sit in the hot water for at least 60 minutes.

Step 2
After the 60 minutes of soaking, return the pot to high heat and place the ham bone, carrots, celery, onion, garlic, mustard and bay leaves in the pot. Stir well, bring to a boil, reduce heat to low and simmer for 60 more minutes.

Step 3
Remove ham bone and discard. Stir in the chopped ham and simmer for 30 more minutes. Season with ground white pepper to taste.


But talking about ham and bean soup is a little like talking about 'people'. There are so many variations! For example, looking at the recipe above, I've never had a home-made soup that used dry mustard powder. And I have NO idea what that would taste like! But everything else looks typical to me.

So I guess 'your mileage may vary' depending on who was making the soups you're familiar with, and what variations they were following.




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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 1:35 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


So I tried out a new recipe that I made up for the family (not for me, I'm allergic to beef)

Beef pot pie

Since I was using a very tough and grisly cut of beef (chuck roast from an old cow, I imagine!) I was trying to find a way to make that palatable for both hubby and dear daughter, both of whom refuse to eat tough meat. So I trimmed the beef VERY closely, cutting out all of the gristle that could find, diced tbe beef and cooked it in an unconsionable amount of margarine with a LOT of black pepper in chicken broth until almost tender (about 1 hour) then added diced carrots and celery and green beans (normally I would use peas but dd can't eat THEM. Cooking for the family is like an effing minefield of sensitivities and allergies!) cooked until tender, then added some flour to thicken, topped with pre-made pie crust, and browned in the oven.

For such a simple recipe it came out very tasty! Or, at least, the family ate it with only a few complaints: hubby thought the green beans clashed with the rest of the dish (maybe next time diced zucchini?) and dd didn't like the fact that there were big pepper flakes in it, but overall a recipe worth trying again.

At least I used up one terrible piece of beef!

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

#WEARAMASK

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 1:44 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Also, tried a recipe from ATC cookbook: chicken Canzanese.

It has 4 lb thighs chicken, 1 c broth, 2 c white wine, sage, bay leaves, rosemary, and prosciutto.

I've tried a recipe like that before- chicken saltimboca- but the results were underwhelming, so was curious to see how this one turned out. I believe it was better than the saltimboca, but the recipe calls for chicken thighs and hubby hates dark chicken, so I had to adjust the recipe to accomodate chicken breasts by taking the other parts (thighs, drumsticks and wings) thru the whole cooking process but adding the breast pieces very late. (Nothing comes out drier and ickier than overcooked chicken breast; you need to get it JUST to the point of no more pink, but not past that!)

Also turned out well enuf to try again, but the issue with the chicken breast pieces is that they didn't benefit from being cooked in the very tasty sauce, so I would probably marinade them salt, prosciutto, sage and white wine BEFORE cooking, so they absorb some tasty flavor.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

#WEARAMASK

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 6:31 PM

BRENDA


Got a bit better pot for my new bamboo steamer.

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 6:44 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
So I tried out a new recipe that I made up for the family (not for me, I'm allergic to beef)

Beef pot pie

Since I was using a very tough and grisly cut of beef (chuck roast from an old cow, I imagine!) I was trying to find a way to make that palatable for both hubby and dear daughter, both of whom refuse to eat tough meat. So I trimmed the beef VERY closely, cutting out all of the gristle that could find, diced tbe beef and cooked it in an unconsionable amount of margarine with a LOT of black pepper in chicken broth until almost tender (about 1 hour) then added diced carrots and celery and green beans (normally I would use peas but dd can't eat THEM. Cooking for the family is like an effing minefield of sensitivities and allergies!) cooked until tender, then added some flour to thicken, topped with pre-made pie crust, and browned in the oven.

For such a simple recipe it came out very tasty! Or, at least, the family ate it with only a few complaints: hubby thought the green beans clashed with the rest of the dish (maybe next time diced zucchini?) and dd didn't like the fact that there were big pepper flakes in it, but overall a recipe worth trying again.

At least I used up one terrible piece of beef!

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

#WEARAMASK

No onion? How about peas instead of green beans? Or peas and mushrooms?

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 6:47 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Also, tried a recipe from ATC cookbook: chicken Canzanese.

It has 4 lb thighs chicken, 1 c broth, 2 c white wine, sage, bay leaves, rosemary, and prosciutto.

I've tried a recipe like that before- chicken saltimboca- but the results were underwhelming, so was curious to see how this one turned out. I believe it was better than the saltimboca, but the recipe calls for chicken thighs and hubby hates dark chicken, so I had to adjust the recipe to accomodate chicken breasts by taking the other parts (thighs, drumsticks and wings) thru the whole cooking process but adding the breast pieces very late. (Nothing comes out drier and ickier than overcooked chicken breast; you need to get it JUST to the point of no more pink, but not past that!)

Also turned out well enuf to try again, but the issue with the chicken breast pieces is that they didn't benefit from being cooked in the very tasty sauce, so I would probably marinade them salt, prosciutto, sage and white wine BEFORE cooking, so they absorb some tasty flavor.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

#WEARAMASK

what vegetables did you serve with it?

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 6:47 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Got a bit better pot for my new bamboo steamer.

Awesome!

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Tuesday, August 11, 2020 6:54 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


I have a new recipe which is a lot like jok, but not entirely. I've substituted about half the volume of cooked rice with riced cauliflower, and it also has celery and onion, plus ginger and garlic; and I added chicken as a mild-tasting protein. It came out tasty! to me. The next time I think I'm going to cook it with a ham bone or ham hocks for flavor, the way the Asians I know cook their jok. I could see it being done with turkey, pork (like tiny flavorful meatballs), or even seafood (though the seafood would take it in a totally different direction), and even tofu. The only thing I don't see it going with is beef.

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 7:26 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
So I tried out a new recipe that I made up for the family (not for me, I'm allergic to beef)

Beef pot pie

Since I was using a very tough and grisly cut of beef (chuck roast from an old cow, I imagine!) I was trying to find a way to make that palatable for both hubby and dear daughter, both of whom refuse to eat tough meat. So I trimmed the beef VERY closely, cutting out all of the gristle that could find, diced tbe beef and cooked it in an unconsionable amount of margarine with a LOT of black pepper in chicken broth until almost tender (about 1 hour) then added diced carrots and celery and green beans (normally I would use peas but dd can't eat THEM. Cooking for the family is like an effing minefield of sensitivities and allergies!) cooked until tender, then added some flour to thicken, topped with pre-made pie crust, and browned in the oven.

For such a simple recipe it came out very tasty! Or, at least, the family ate it with only a few complaints: hubby thought the green beans clashed with the rest of the dish (maybe next time diced zucchini?) and dd didn't like the fact that there were big pepper flakes in it, but overall a recipe worth trying again.

At least I used up one terrible piece of beef!

When reading, the first thing I thought was why didn't you marinate overnight in wine?
At the end you mention such possibility, but you say SALT and wine - and white wine at that!! With SALT!! There oughta be a law against that.

IIRC, my go-to marinade for beef was Cold Duck. But I think any red wine does well, and Julia Childs I think used Bourbon. I don't recall if I've tried vermouth for this, although I do use that for tomato meat sauce.
For chicken, I think I always marinated in orange juice.

Now, the traditional way for the wine/beef was to cover the beef in a bowl with the wine, which seems to waste a bunch of wine, and for such a lousy piece of beef that you have mentioned. But my preferred way, vastly more alcohol efficient, is to use Ziplock bag. Put in the beef (using more than one bag is fine), add in enough wine that can be soaked up by the beef, and then push out most of the air as you zip iot closed. Using a bowl or similar solely as a prop to position the bagful such that the air pocket is not touching the meat, even when the wine lowers due to absorption. Let that sit in your fridge overnight.
AND SKIP THE SALT!!

I've tried using pre-made crescent roll dough (Which is in triangles) as pot pie crust. Have you tried that?

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 11:45 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Got a bit better pot for my new bamboo steamer.

Awesome!



Yup. Now, I can use it as regular that I want.

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Thursday, August 13, 2020 1:01 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


I sure hope you post the things you find are tasty fixins'.

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Thursday, August 13, 2020 3:14 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:

No onion? How about peas instead of green beans? Or peas and mushrooms?
As we work thru the foods that cause dd gastrointestinal issues, we've found she can't eat peas and mushrooms in addition to dried beans and crucifers.

Plus, in trying to understand what is driving all of this, crucifers and dried beans have TWO things in common: raffinose and sulfur compounds. Since Beanzyme only helps a little with beans I wonder if maybe sulfur compounds in general are causing part of the problem. possibly some sort of reducing gut bacteria creating H2S or something. Out of an abundance of caution I've eliminated garlic and onions from dd's diet as well, since they contain yet another sulfur compound (allicin).

Like I said: cooking for the family is like a minefield.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

#WEARAMASK

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Thursday, August 13, 2020 4:08 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Yeah - omg what a minefield!

Signy, I may have mentioned that I have a spreadsheet for recipes.

Here's the vegetables I have listed.

Maybe if you look thru it you'll find one or 2 you haven't thought of that you might use to round out your family's meals.

I'm sorry, but this is the best I can think of to do that might be helpful.

ginger root
asparagus
artichokes
Tomatillos
cucumber
corn
squash summer zucchini/ crookneck /straightneck
Squash winter all varieties /acorn /butternut /spaghetti /delicata /hubbard
Sweet potato
spinach
Sweet potato leaves
Amaranth leaves
Beets
Beet greens
radicchio
Dandelion greens
chicory
chard
Sorrel
Yam
Spices, curry powder
Spices, garam masala
Carrots
Parsnips
Celery
Fennel bulb
Alfalfa seeds sprouted
Jerusalem-artichokes
water chestnuts
bamboo shoots
Avocados
Cilantro
parsley

garlic clove
onions /scallions /shallot /onions sweet /leeks, bulb and lower leaf portion
mushrooms composite
Beans snap/ green /yellow

crucifers
Arugula
Bok choy
Broccoli
Broccoli rabe
Broccoli romanesco
Brussels sprouts
Cabbage
Cauliflower
Collard greens
Daikon
Garden cress
Horseradish
Kale
Kohlrabi
Mustard greens
Mizuna
Radishes
Rutabaga
Swiss chard
Turnips
Wasabi
Watercress

tomato /paste /sauce /canned /juice /soup
potatoes generic
Eggplant
sweet pepper composite
chili pepper composite
Spices, paprika /Spices, chipotle /Spices, chili powder
Lettuce butterhead includes boston and bibb types raw
Lettuce cos or romaine
Lettuce green leaf
Lettuce iceberg includes crisphead types
Lettuce red leaf
lettuce composite
Endive

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Friday, August 21, 2020 9:15 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


I finalized my faux-jok recipe. The addition of a smoked and cured ham-hock actually made the rice in the porridge taste even creamier and more like rice, as counter intuitive as that sounds.

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Friday, August 21, 2020 11:26 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
I sure hope you post the things you find are tasty fixins'.



I will. Went looking for small piece of salmon today but couldn't find one. I love salmon, good west coast girl me.

So I settled for some chicken wings.

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Wednesday, August 26, 2020 5:53 PM

BRENDA


Steamed beets on the menu for tonight.

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Wednesday, August 26, 2020 6:24 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Steamed beets on the menu for tonight.

Do they not need to be covered in water or juice for this method? I just can't recall this process in my head right now.

But I still firmly believe that all vegetables are at their tastiest when served in a butter jacuzzi.

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Wednesday, August 26, 2020 11:37 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Steamed beets on the menu for tonight.

Do they not need to be covered in water or juice for this method? I just can't recall this process in my head right now.

But I still firmly believe that all vegetables are at their tastiest when served in a butter jacuzzi.



Up thread I had mentioned that I replaced my medium sized bamboo steamer. So, the process for that is put on a pot of water, the steamer on the pot with a plate in the steamer for the vegetable of choice. In this case beets. Put the stove on high to start with till the water is boiling, add veg then the lid on. Steam until cooked.

Butter and beets to me just don't jive.

Butter or margarine is for potatoes, corn, carrots or cabbage, brussel sprouts, broccoli. Just my opinion.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020 1:05 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Hey Brenda

Thank for the posts!

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Thursday, August 27, 2020 3:08 AM

BRENDA


Welcome Kiki. Though I'm not sure what you are thanking me for.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020 3:53 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Well, I'm always curious about how people cook in real life and what they find tasty.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020 1:36 PM

BRENDA


Aah, now I understand.

Steaming a beet really brings out the sugar in them. So sweet and tender.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020 4:32 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Steamed beets on the menu for tonight.

Do they not need to be covered in water or juice for this method? I just can't recall this process in my head right now.

But I still firmly believe that all vegetables are at their tastiest when served in a butter jacuzzi.

Up thread I had mentioned that I replaced my medium sized bamboo steamer. So, the process for that is put on a pot of water, the steamer on the pot with a plate in the steamer for the vegetable of choice. In this case beets. Put the stove on high to start with till the water is boiling, add veg then the lid on. Steam until cooked.

Butter and beets to me just don't jive.

Butter or margarine is for potatoes, corn, carrots or cabbage, brussel sprouts, broccoli. Just my opinion.

No margie rine for me. But butter is great melted on beets, green beans, peas, and the others you mentioned. Many people seem surprised the way I butter my corn on the cob, and then copy me. Big wad of butter on a slice of bread, or sliced open dinner roll, then hold the bread in one hand, and lay the cob in the wead of butter, spin the cob with the other hand. End up with both well buttered cob, and as buttered bread as well.

Anyhow, I was thinking you were doing beet slices, like red beets. But I recently had some chunky beets, like giant diced, about 3/4" cuts. Those were plump and delicious. But pickled beets don't need butter.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020 6:39 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Steamed beets on the menu for tonight.

Do they not need to be covered in water or juice for this method? I just can't recall this process in my head right now.

But I still firmly believe that all vegetables are at their tastiest when served in a butter jacuzzi.

Up thread I had mentioned that I replaced my medium sized bamboo steamer. So, the process for that is put on a pot of water, the steamer on the pot with a plate in the steamer for the vegetable of choice. In this case beets. Put the stove on high to start with till the water is boiling, add veg then the lid on. Steam until cooked.

Butter and beets to me just don't jive.

Butter or margarine is for potatoes, corn, carrots or cabbage, brussel sprouts, broccoli. Just my opinion.

No margie rine for me. But butter is great melted on beets, green beans, peas, and the others you mentioned. Many people seem surprised the way I butter my corn on the cob, and then copy me. Big wad of butter on a slice of bread, or sliced open dinner roll, then hold the bread in one hand, and lay the cob in the wead of butter, spin the cob with the other hand. End up with both well buttered cob, and as buttered bread as well.

Anyhow, I was thinking you were doing beet slices, like red beets. But I recently had some chunky beets, like giant diced, about 3/4" cuts. Those were plump and delicious. But pickled beets don't need butter.



I don't eat any beans as I don't like them. Also I only eat peas when they are fresh and uncooked. I missed pea season up here this year and I am annoyed with myself for that.

No, I was talking about whole red beets. I peeled those last night before steaming them. Less hassle when I go to eat them. Sorry, I just don't butter my beets. They taste best to me fresh cooked and unadorned.

Pickled beets are goood. Developed a taste for those when I was a kid. Neighbours we had used to make them. First time I had ever eaten then and really liked them. Not sure I could eat them now.

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Thursday, August 27, 2020 6:41 PM

BRENDA


Supper tonight my riff on a Spanish rice dish.

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Wednesday, September 9, 2020 7:36 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


I had both CobCorn and buttered beets, although I nuked them. I don't think I have a steamer. Had them because they were on my mind after these posts.


Avoiding green bean casserole would be hard for me. The new flavor of fried onions from French's is carmelized flavor, and that is even harder to remove from my desired diet.



I noticed that with internet results for cooking cob corn, there is a wide discrepancy. Boil water, then add cobs, then bring to boil again, then some places say 3-5 minuts, and others say 8-10 minutes. Why the huge difference? Whic is correct? What are the secrets of boiling Corn on the cob?

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Wednesday, September 9, 2020 11:09 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I had both CobCorn and buttered beets, although I nuked them. I don't think I have a steamer. Had them because they were on my mind after these posts.


Avoiding green bean casserole would be hard for me. The new flavor of fried onions from French's is carmelized flavor, and that is even harder to remove from my desired diet.



I noticed that with internet results for cooking cob corn, there is a wide discrepancy. Boil water, then add cobs, then bring to boil again, then some places say 3-5 minuts, and others say 8-10 minutes. Why the huge difference? Whic is correct? What are the secrets of boiling Corn on the cob?



I just had some cauliflower tonight.

I can't eat onions at all. They make me feel sick.

Well, I think the reason for the differences probably depends on how tender you like your corn. Same would go for steaming it.

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Thursday, September 10, 2020 6:34 PM

BRENDA


Chicken thighs cooking. Don't know what is going with them.

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Monday, September 14, 2020 4:23 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
So I tried out a new recipe that I made up for the family (not for me, I'm allergic to beef)

Beef pot pie

Since I was using a very tough and grisly cut of beef (chuck roast from an old cow, I imagine!) I was trying to find a way to make that palatable for both hubby and dear daughter, both of whom refuse to eat tough meat. So I trimmed the beef VERY closely, cutting out all of the gristle that could find, diced tbe beef and cooked it in an unconsionable amount of margarine with a LOT of black pepper in chicken broth until almost tender (about 1 hour) then added diced carrots and celery and green beans (normally I would use peas but dd can't eat THEM. Cooking for the family is like an effing minefield of sensitivities and allergies!) cooked until tender, then added some flour to thicken, topped with pre-made pie crust, and browned in the oven.

For such a simple recipe it came out very tasty! Or, at least, the family ate it with only a few complaints: hubby thought the green beans clashed with the rest of the dish (maybe next time diced zucchini?) and dd didn't like the fact that there were big pepper flakes in it, but overall a recipe worth trying again.

At least I used up one terrible piece of beef!

When reading, the first thing I thought was why didn't you marinate overnight in wine?
At the end you mention such possibility, but you say SALT and wine - and white wine at that!! With SALT!! There oughta be a law against that.

IIRC, my go-to marinade for beef was Cold Duck. But I think any red wine does well, and Julia Childs I think used Bourbon. I don't recall if I've tried vermouth for this, although I do use that for tomato meat sauce.
For chicken, I think I always marinated in orange juice.

Now, the traditional way for the wine/beef was to cover the beef in a bowl with the wine, which seems to waste a bunch of wine, and for such a lousy piece of beef that you have mentioned. But my preferred way, vastly more alcohol efficient, is to use Ziplock bag. Put in the beef (using more than one bag is fine), add in enough wine that can be soaked up by the beef, and then push out most of the air as you zip iot closed. Using a bowl or similar solely as a prop to position the bagful such that the air pocket is not touching the meat, even when the wine lowers due to absorption. Let that sit in your fridge overnight.
AND SKIP THE SALT!!

I've tried using pre-made crescent roll dough (Which is in triangles) as pot pie crust. Have you tried that?

When I said Julia Childs used Bourbon, I now think it was Burgundy instead.

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Monday, September 14, 2020 5:13 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Chicken thighs cooking. Don't know what is going with them.

Gravy, biscuits, and collards with bacon and onion ...

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Monday, September 14, 2020 5:16 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
When reading, the first thing I thought was why didn't you marinate overnight in wine?

Fwiw, I always thought red wine gave any dish an unfortunate purple-ish color.

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Monday, September 14, 2020 5:25 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


So, I'm forging ahead with trying to create a stable set of recipes with LOTS of veges - half a pound, measured raw, per serving (since I hate veges and have to find ways to get them into my diet) and meeting some other parameters (about 30 grams of protein, 30 grams of carbs, and 500cals max).

At the moment I'm feasting on some previously cooked batches - mushroom and beef marinara, 'jok' made with rice and riced cauliflower, pork and beans with bacon, and individual meatloaves filled with veges and glazed with ketchup (aka catsup).

So I'm moving on ahead with trying out a new concoction for chicken pot pie, a recipe MADE for veges if I ever saw one!

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Monday, September 14, 2020 5:29 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
When reading, the first thing I thought was why didn't you marinate overnight in wine?

Fwiw, I always thought red wine gave any dish an unfortunate purle-ish color.

I always took the meat out of the marinade before cooking. Are you saying the wine which soaked into the meat would then come out during cooking and discolor the dish?

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Monday, September 14, 2020 5:36 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Oh, I've seen a lot of recipes where they just glug-glug the red wine into the pot! I think it was an America's Test Kitchen recipe for beef and pappardelle where that tinge actually showed up on camera in a close-up! But yes, the red wine soak gives the meat an unfortunate purple tinge, imo (unless maybe you brown the meat ahead of time after marinading - but that's just far too fussy for me). So I still use wine, just not red wine. But I'm sure lots of people aren't as color-attuned as I am. They'd look at a purple(ish)-brown piece of beef and see a piece of beef.

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Monday, September 14, 2020 5:39 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Chicken thighs cooking. Don't know what is going with them.

Gravy, biscuits, and collards with bacon and onion ...



Gravy and biscuits sound good. Never eaten a collard green though I think you can buy them up here. Bacon is always tasty especially when extra crispy. But no onions thank you. They give me an upset stomach.

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Monday, September 14, 2020 5:45 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


If you get fresh collards you can help yourself to a shorter cooking time and more tender dish if you remove the central rib before cutting up the leaf into pieces before cooking. Just lay each leaf flat and cut the rib out by running a knife along each side of it. Or, some people swear by gripping the large end of the rib, then grasping at either side of the rib, running your fingers down and stripping the leaf off of the rib by hand. But if you get frozen/chopped that central rib will be in there, so you'll have to cook longer. I think collards are my favorite of the leafy greens! They cook up a bit green tasting and a bit buttery and a bit sweet, but generally very mild.

Onions - totally not necessary!!


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Tuesday, September 15, 2020 11:43 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


I made the (crustless) chicken pot pie recipe and it was AWESOME!

For 12 svgs

6 lbs boneless skinless chx thighs (or fewer - the ones I get seem to shrink down to nothing) cut into appropriate-sized pieces
1 qt chx broth (home made or boxed)
1 lb @ carrot onion celery greenbeans peas 2 lbs potatoes all but the peas cut into appropriate-sized pieces
a huge bunch of thyme, strip off the leaves for the dish
a huge bunch of flat leaf parsley cut off the leaves for the dish
5 or so dried bay leaves
2 C whole milk
2 T unsalted butter
2 T neutral cooking oil
1/4 C flour of your choice
salt and pepper to taste

Put the butter and oil in a large pot, add the carrot onion and celery, S&P, cover and sweat till about half done.
Add the broth, potatoes, chicken, green beans, thyme, S&P, and bay leaves, cook till chicken and potatoes are both done.
Add the parsley and peas.
Stir all.
At this point what you have is a a tasty chicken pot pie soup.
Dish out the chicken and veges with a slotted spoon to drain, removing the bay leaves as you go.
Heat and reduce the remaining broth to about 2 C, add 2 C milk, S&P, and 1/4 C flour, heat and stir to thicken the gravy. Pour over the chicken and vegetables.



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Tuesday, September 15, 2020 3:14 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
Oh, I've seen a lot of recipes where they just glug-glug the red wine into the pot! I think it was an America's Test Kitchen recipe for beef and pappardelle where that tinge actually showed up on camera in a close-up! But yes, the red wine soak gives the meat an unfortunate purple tinge, imo (unless maybe you brown the meat ahead of time after marinading - but that's just far too fussy for me). So I still use wine, just not red wine. But I'm sure lots of people aren't as color-attuned as I am. They'd look at a purple(ish)-brown piece of beef and see a piece of beef.

I guess I have seen a lot of dishes where the meat is seared right away, to keep the juices inside - whether beef or chicken, and some fish. But I haven't been a stickler about it. My High School colors were White/Purple, so purple eggs broke my dependence upon color-taste coordination.


Regarding your recipe above, I wonder how many gallons translate to "huge bunch"

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Tuesday, September 15, 2020 5:47 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
If you get fresh collards you can help yourself to a shorter cooking time and more tender dish if you remove the central rib before cutting up the leaf into pieces before cooking. Just lay each leaf flat and cut the rib out by running a knife along each side of it. Or, some people swear by gripping the large end of the rib, then grasping at either side of the rib, running your fingers down and stripping the leaf off of the rib by hand. But if you get frozen/chopped that central rib will be in there, so you'll have to cook longer. I think collards are my favorite of the leafy greens! They cook up a bit green tasting and a bit buttery and a bit sweet, but generally very mild.

Onions - totally not necessary!!




I know there is a rib in them and it would have to be removed. Often thought I should give them a try.

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Tuesday, September 15, 2020 9:11 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Regarding your recipe above, I wonder how many gallons translate to "huge bunch"
Oh, it's 'to taste' like the salt and pepper. I really like fresh thyme, bay leaf, and parsley, and it IS for 12 servings! So I used one whole plastic container of fresh thyme from the store, and a roughly 4" bouquet of parsley leave's worth, plus 5 dried bay leaves.

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Wednesday, September 16, 2020 2:29 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


After seeing Brenda state that she wants her bacon hard, like crispy, crunchy, brittle, crumbly, I wonder what other preferences folks are interested in. This might only apply to when you go out, eat where others are making your food.

I have learned to always ask for my bacon soft and juicy, otherwise I can't grumble.
I do bacon the same way if adding it to a dish, like green bean casserole. Soft and Juicy allows cutting with a scissors.

I usually request extra sauce. For pasta, subs, garlic bread dips, gyros, asian dishes like teriyaki, BBQ sauces on meats, tartar on fish or french fries, dipping sauces for nugget-type fare.

i usually request extra flavoring, like for milkshakes, flavored limeade or lemonades, etc.

I request real butter. If no butter is available, then no margarine or other fake flavorings. When my order arrives slathered in margarine or spread, those items will go in their trash, along with their tip.

I request my steaks medium medium medium, which normally gets the picture across.

I like my ribs and chicken falling off the bone tender.

I like my pizza crust (bottom) to not be baked cardboard or Masonite. It should be flexible or chewy.


I like my eggs scrambled wet.



What about you?


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Wednesday, September 16, 2020 6:44 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
After seeing Brenda state that she wants her bacon hard, like crispy, crunchy, brittle, crumbly, I wonder what other preferences folks are interested in. This might only apply to when you go out, eat where others are making your food.

I have learned to always ask for my bacon soft and juicy, otherwise I can't grumble.
I do bacon the same way if adding it to a dish, like green bean casserole. Soft and Juicy allows cutting with a scissors.

I usually request extra sauce. For pasta, subs, garlic bread dips, gyros, asian dishes like teriyaki, BBQ sauces on meats, tartar on fish or french fries, dipping sauces for nugget-type fare.

i usually request extra flavoring, like for milkshakes, flavored limeade or lemonades, etc.

I request real butter. If no butter is available, then no margarine or other fake flavorings. When my order arrives slathered in margarine or spread, those items will go in their trash, along with their tip.

I request my steaks medium medium medium, which normally gets the picture across.

I like my ribs and chicken falling off the bone tender.

I like my pizza crust (bottom) to not be baked cardboard or Masonite. It should be flexible or chewy.


I like my eggs scrambled wet.



What about you?




I like my bacon crispy. Not hard and there is a difference. Chewy bacon is just yuck to me. My opinion.

I don't ask for extra sauce on anything because I find pasta sauces and teriyaki sauces can be too sweet. Sugar is added to both of those and so I make do with what is on the food. And if they are too sweet then I don't eat that item again. I like BBQ but hard to get good up here and again the amount of acid or sugar added makes a difference to me. I don't like tartar sauce and so I don't eat it.

I love fish and chips though. The batter can't be so thick that I have to fight my way through it to get to find the fish. Light and crispy batter and the fries should be light and well fried as well. I add just a little salt.

I don't drink a lot of milkshakes because of all the cream and milk in them. Favourite is chocolate. Though when I was a child, my dad used to make banana milkshakes and they were good. Can't have lemonade or anything citrus because of my seizure meds.

I can handle a medium steak but I prefer well done. I don't eat anything that bleeds at me.

Chicken we can agree on. Tender enough to fall off the bone.

Pizza crust well baked.

I prefer my eggs hard scrambled.

Also I prefer margarine because butter is too greasy for me when it melts.

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Wednesday, September 16, 2020 6:45 PM

BRENDA


Got some really nice brussell sprouts at a local Safeway. Now, I will go back in a couple of days and get some lamb chops for birthday supper.

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Thursday, September 17, 2020 5:05 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
After seeing Brenda state that she wants her bacon hard, like crispy, crunchy, brittle, crumbly, I wonder what other preferences folks are interested in. This might only apply to when you go out, eat where others are making your food.

I have learned to always ask for my bacon soft and juicy, otherwise I can't grumble.
I do bacon the same way if adding it to a dish, like green bean casserole. Soft and Juicy allows cutting with a scissors.

I usually request extra sauce. For pasta, subs, garlic bread dips, gyros, asian dishes like teriyaki, BBQ sauces on meats, tartar on fish or french fries, dipping sauces for nugget-type fare.

i usually request extra flavoring, like for milkshakes, flavored limeade or lemonades, etc.

I request real butter. If no butter is available, then no margarine or other fake flavorings. When my order arrives slathered in margarine or spread, those items will go in their trash, along with their tip.

I request my steaks medium medium medium, which normally gets the picture across.

I like my ribs and chicken falling off the bone tender.

I like my pizza crust (bottom) to not be baked cardboard or Masonite. It should be flexible or chewy.


I like my eggs scrambled wet.



What about you?




I like my bacon crispy. Not hard and there is a difference. Chewy bacon is just yuck to me. My opinion.

I don't ask for extra sauce on anything because I find pasta sauces and teriyaki sauces can be too sweet. Sugar is added to both of those and so I make do with what is on the food. And if they are too sweet then I don't eat that item again. I like BBQ but hard to get good up here and again the amount of acid or sugar added makes a difference to me. I don't like tartar sauce and so I don't eat it.

I love fish and chips though. The batter can't be so thick that I have to fight my way through it to get to find the fish. Light and crispy batter and the fries should be light and well fried as well. I add just a little salt.

I don't drink a lot of milkshakes because of all the cream and milk in them. Favourite is chocolate. Though when I was a child, my dad used to make banana milkshakes and they were good. Can't have lemonade or anything citrus because of my seizure meds.

I can handle a medium steak but I prefer well done. I don't eat anything that bleeds at me.

Chicken we can agree on. Tender enough to fall off the bone.

Pizza crust well baked.

I prefer my eggs hard scrambled.

Also I prefer margarine because butter is too greasy for me when it melts.

I generally avoid well done steak outside the home, once I learned that this is CODE for cooks to find the worst piece of steak they have on hard, because well done means all of the flavor and nuance will be cooked out of it - so no need to waste a tender and scrumptious piece.


I forgot to mention that I have not added salt to anything in 2 or 3 decades.

What is the difference between hard or crispy bacon? Is one drier that the other? More or less greasy? Do you not bake liver with bacon and onion laid on top?
I could have said that for me, soft and juicy means the fat/grease is drained off (or my preferred cooking method, grease-free), and it can be cut/segmented with the side of a fork.

one of my favorite Cafes has real ice cream shakes, and for chocolate, I ask for double the amount of chocolate flavoring, and that is just perfect. Some places say they will charge extra for it, and it is always work it, must most don't actually charge it.

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Thursday, September 17, 2020 6:23 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
After seeing Brenda state that she wants her bacon hard, like crispy, crunchy, brittle, crumbly, I wonder what other preferences folks are interested in. This might only apply to when you go out, eat where others are making your food.

I have learned to always ask for my bacon soft and juicy, otherwise I can't grumble.
I do bacon the same way if adding it to a dish, like green bean casserole. Soft and Juicy allows cutting with a scissors.

I usually request extra sauce. For pasta, subs, garlic bread dips, gyros, asian dishes like teriyaki, BBQ sauces on meats, tartar on fish or french fries, dipping sauces for nugget-type fare.

i usually request extra flavoring, like for milkshakes, flavored limeade or lemonades, etc.

I request real butter. If no butter is available, then no margarine or other fake flavorings. When my order arrives slathered in margarine or spread, those items will go in their trash, along with their tip.

I request my steaks medium medium medium, which normally gets the picture across.

I like my ribs and chicken falling off the bone tender.

I like my pizza crust (bottom) to not be baked cardboard or Masonite. It should be flexible or chewy.


I like my eggs scrambled wet.



What about you?




I like my bacon crispy. Not hard and there is a difference. Chewy bacon is just yuck to me. My opinion.

I don't ask for extra sauce on anything because I find pasta sauces and teriyaki sauces can be too sweet. Sugar is added to both of those and so I make do with what is on the food. And if they are too sweet then I don't eat that item again. I like BBQ but hard to get good up here and again the amount of acid or sugar added makes a difference to me. I don't like tartar sauce and so I don't eat it.

I love fish and chips though. The batter can't be so thick that I have to fight my way through it to get to find the fish. Light and crispy batter and the fries should be light and well fried as well. I add just a little salt.

I don't drink a lot of milkshakes because of all the cream and milk in them. Favourite is chocolate. Though when I was a child, my dad used to make banana milkshakes and they were good. Can't have lemonade or anything citrus because of my seizure meds.

I can handle a medium steak but I prefer well done. I don't eat anything that bleeds at me.

Chicken we can agree on. Tender enough to fall off the bone.

Pizza crust well baked.

I prefer my eggs hard scrambled.

Also I prefer margarine because butter is too greasy for me when it melts.

I generally avoid well done steak outside the home, once I learned that this is CODE for cooks to find the worst piece of steak they have on hard, because well done means all of the flavor and nuance will be cooked out of it - so no need to waste a tender and scrumptious piece.


I forgot to mention that I have not added salt to anything in 2 or 3 decades.

What is the difference between hard or crispy bacon? Is one drier that the other? More or less greasy? Do you not bake liver with bacon and onion laid on top?
I could have said that for me, soft and juicy means the fat/grease is drained off (or my preferred cooking method, grease-free), and it can be cut/segmented with the side of a fork.

one of my favorite Cafes has real ice cream shakes, and for chocolate, I ask for double the amount of chocolate flavoring, and that is just perfect. Some places say they will charge extra for it, and it is always work it, must most don't actually charge it.



I find well done steaks up here plenty tasty when I eat them in a restaurant. Not that I do that much.

Hard bacon is when it has been cooked to death. Crispy means that the fat is rendered and what is left is browned.

I do not eat liver as I don't like it and I don't eat onions in any form as they give me an upset stomach.

That place you mentioned does sound good. I like a good chocolate milkshake once in a while. As a treat.

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Monday, September 21, 2020 4:11 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


I've been seeing ads on TV for PBfit. It seems to be powdered peanuts, with oil removed.
Seems only stirring in water makes it into low-fat peanut butter.

This would seem good for recipes, including cookies.

Anybody tried it?

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Monday, September 21, 2020 4:20 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I usually request extra sauce. For pasta, subs, garlic bread dips, gyros, asian dishes like teriyaki, BBQ sauces on meats, tartar on fish or french fries, dipping sauces for nugget-type fare.

What about you?

I don't ask for extra sauce on anything because I find pasta sauces and teriyaki sauces can be too sweet. Sugar is added to both of those and so I make do with what is on the food. And if they are too sweet then I don't eat that item again. I like BBQ but hard to get good up here and again the amount of acid or sugar added makes a difference to me.

I guess I don't care for bare naked pasta, it tastes too bland.
For me, the most plain pasta I have is in a butter jacuzzi - fettucini or spaghetti noodles or mostly elbow macaroni.
Otherwise I don't like my spaghetti noodles coming out just pink colored - I want sauce to be sticking to the noodles. Tomato sauce, Alfredo sauce, I ask for plenty. Any excess remaining can be soaked up with the (garlic) bread or rolls. The one that is difficult is the clam sauce - but I still want the noodles to retain the flavor of that sauce when they hit my mouth.

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Monday, September 21, 2020 6:24 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I've been seeing ads on TV for PBfit. It seems to be powdered peanuts, with oil removed.
Seems only stirring in water makes it into low-fat peanut butter.

This would seem good for recipes, including cookies.

Anybody tried it?



I've seen it in a local grocery store up here but to me that is wrong on all sorts of levels.

So long story short, haven't tried it and won't.

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