REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

new deadly human-to-human-transmissible coronavirus emerges out of China

POSTED BY: 1KIKI
UPDATED: Monday, June 1, 2020 18:10
SHORT URL:
VIEWED: 21620
PAGE 13 of 34

Monday, March 9, 2020 8:51 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Gas prices by me were under $2 last night for the first time in over two years.

COVID is awesome.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

Hm. China stops consuming oil/petroleum. This unbalances the supply/demand and price/production formula for OPEC & Russia. This drops the price of gas, I suppose. I might take a look at the gas station.

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Monday, March 9, 2020 8:55 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN



This site
https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/
now says 13% of Active Cases are critical/serious, 6% of Closed cases are fatal.


DP cases have 7 deaths . 245 recovered, 32 serious/critical.

USA poised to surpass Diamond Princess for 8th place.

US is in 9th place, with 668 cases and 15 recoveries. 26 deaths.

Canada is tied for 25th place, with 77 cases, 8 recoveries. 1 death.

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Monday, March 9, 2020 9:06 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
The buss transmission could be from grabbing the headrests/handbars while entering/exiting, and cornering while moving. That would explain a lot of that diagram.

That doesn't explain the people ahead of him. Presumably they exited before he did since he was in the back of the bus, and on the bus for the whole ride.

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Monday, March 9, 2020 10:04 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


My old man said he saw on the news that 15 people died the other day in an old folks home in Seattle from COVID.

I told him that I've heard no such thing. JSF is saying that there are 19 confirmed deaths, just like I read the other day as well.

Has anybody heard this old folks home story?


I told him not to believe anything the news is saying about any of this until at least a week later because they don't do any due diligence and just report on anything that stokes TDS before they figure out if there is any truth to it or not.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Monday, March 9, 2020 11:02 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html

Authorities say 19 of the deaths in Washington are associated with the Life Care Center of Kirkland, Washington.

Read more here: https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html#storylink=cpy

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Monday, March 9, 2020 11:48 PM

BRENDA


First COVID-19 death logged in British Columbia today. A man in his 70s in a care home in North Vancouver.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 4:20 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html

Authorities say 19 of the deaths in Washington are associated with the Life Care Center of Kirkland, Washington.

Read more here: https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html#storylink=cpy



"19 of the deaths in Washington"?

JSF said there are 19 deaths in the US period.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 5:14 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html

Authorities say 19 of the deaths in Washington are associated with the Life Care Center of Kirkland, Washington.

Read more here: https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html#storylink=cpy



"19 of the deaths in Washington"?

JSF said there are 19 deaths in the US period.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

As of six hours ago, the known USA death toll was 26. You keep treating the pandemic like a static situation instaed of the rapidly-evolving one that it is, so you'll have to keep up when a situation changes by the hour, and sometimes by the minute.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 5:49 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Trumo is making a YUGE mistake by treating this like "the flu". I listened to part of his presser with Mike Pence .. "We want you to travel?" DOOD, I don't care if you restrict travel to China, Italy, or S Korea, we DON'T want you to travel. Not in a plane, not on a train. Not on a boat, not with a goat. Not on a bus, not by the subway. Not here or there. Not ANYwhere.

Trump's inability to see this as anything other than a stock market problem reveals a weakness in his PR sense. So far, his PR sense has kept him from doing anything truly stupid (starting new wars) even as he can't achieve his campaign promises (bring the troops home, normalize relation with Russia).

There are a few things that might save Trump's bacon:

If this behaves like a regular flu (and no guarantee that it does, it's an entirely different kind of virus) then we will see a remission in the summer, and

Trump's favoring the young might just keep the pandemic from exploding right before the summer lull (if there is any)

By the time the October "flu season" rears its ugly head, the November vote is already baked into the cake.

Trump usually has a preternatural pulse on the American response, but this may be the time that he slips. Trust me,no one wants to see him suceed as much as I do - minus his love of Israel and hate of Iran ... but he's shooting himself in the foot -again- if he doesn't respond to this in a more proactive way.



-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 9:45 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html

Authorities say 19 of the deaths in Washington are associated with the Life Care Center of Kirkland, Washington.

Read more here: https://www.kansascity.com/news/article241036141.html#storylink=cpy



"19 of the deaths in Washington"?

JSF said there are 19 deaths in the US period.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

As of six hours ago, the known USA death toll was 26. You keep treating the pandemic like a static situation instaed of the rapidly-evolving one that it is, so you'll have to keep up when a situation changes by the hour, and sometimes by the minute.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!



So, that's my point about the whole Seattle old folks home "story".

19 + 15 does not equal 26. And that story supposedly happened 2 or 3 days ago. My old man is convinced that it's true. Kiki just said there were 19 deaths in Washington alone.

Your 26 number doesn't reflect any of that.


I'm not treating any of this with respect, because I think the media is doing whatever they can to oust Trump and nothing, including impeachment, has worked so far.



Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 11:02 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


I've been posting metrics from 2 different websites, and quite often they disagree by 40 or more, depending on when the sites get updated.

This site only gets updated once every few hours
As of March 10, 2020 at 14:46 GMT, there have been 729 confirmed cases and 27 deaths due to coronavirus COVID-19 in the United States

and this one gets updated continuously.
Total Confirmed
761


By the time my normal posting time rolls around, they'll be much closer in terms of cases. Neither one is lying, one is just more timely. At the moment however, they're both reporting 27 deaths.

You're smarter than that, to let a simple thing like rapidly changing numbers and updating lag trip you up.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 2:49 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


see latest post for most recent figures

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 4:16 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
I've been posting metrics from 2 different websites, and quite often they disagree by 40 or more, depending on when the sites get updated.

This site only gets updated once every few hours
As of March 10, 2020 at 14:46 GMT, there have been 729 confirmed cases and 27 deaths due to coronavirus COVID-19 in the United States

and this one gets updated continuously.
Total Confirmed
761


By the time my normal posting time rolls around, they'll be much closer in terms of cases. Neither one is lying, one is just more timely. At the moment however, they're both reporting 27 deaths.

You're smarter than that, to let a simple thing like rapidly changing numbers and updating lag trip you up.

I think SIX was hoping to catch you repeating an M$M "lie" so he could ignore the numbers.

Trump is playing to his "base" by downplaying the virus and saying it will "go away". Well, maybe it will throttle back in summer, maybe it will mutate to a less virulent form but there's no guarantee that will ever happen.

I was never part of his base, and if his prediction doesn't come true before the election then IMHO he's digging himself a "heckuva a job, Brownie"-sized hole and it will swallow his election.

Don't get me wrong, SIX. I'm HOPING that Trump wakes the fuck up. I'm on his side. Better late than never.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 5:20 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


So I've been doing some thinking on what to do if things get bad here in SoCal ...

Despite the god-awful lack of testing, individual risk is still low here. If one gets the coronavirus at this point, it really will be a wrong-time/ wrong-place scenario. That said, I read in an article that you should trust your spidey sense about whether or not a situation looks more risky than you're willing to tolerate, and I agree with that completely.

Getting back to transmission - all along I've been assuming it's closer to the measles end, which spreads vigorously by aerosol transmission. But I didn't account for it in my procedures because there wasn't any specific information supporting my hunch. I think the Chinese-reported case study of aerosol transmission is convincing enough for me to rethink what I'm doing or will be doing.

At this point, there's evidence of aerosol transmission up to about 14 feet, and infective aerosol for at least 20 minutes. There's also evidence of active viruses on surfaces for at least 4 days. Given that, touch looks like it's still the most important risk, so that procedure masks in public and sanitizing your hands (and things you touch often like your phone, and keys) immediately when you enter your house are imo protective. Also, anything you bring into the home that's not yours should be evaluated. A person at the meat counter who's wrapping your pork shoulder would be a great person to transmit coronavirus!

The questions come down to when do you start wearing an N95 mask in public, and when do you stop going out altogether. So I'd say it depends. If you time your outings to not-crowded times, and if you let your spidey sense be your guide, I think you can get by with procedure masks and sanitizing for quite a while. I guess my limit is about an overall SoCal or LACounty maximum 1:1000 risk, because I can see the consequences for me being infected would be very high. I would say I'd not pay too much overall attention to neighborhood (unless mine was a hot spot!), because here in SoCal it's not unusual for people to drive 60 miles or more to their work. So overall statistics would be my general guide for wearing an N95 mask, and of course I'd avoid proven hot-spots.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 7:24 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.



Quote:

Leaked Covid-19 Documents: Hospitals Prep For 96 Million Infections & 480K Deaths
Not the 19,000 to 70,000 deaths attributable to the flu.

Quote:

Leaked medical conference documents have warned that hospitals across the United States are preparing for 96 million coronavirus infections. Not only that, but the same document wants hospitals to make preparations for 480,000 deaths from this outbreak.

the American Hospital Association (AHA) conference in February reveal that US hospitals are preparing for:

96 million coronavirus infections

4.8 million hospitalizations from the infection

480,000 deaths in the United States



According to Business Insider, these leaked documents are telling. Dr. James Lawler, a professor at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, presented the harrowing “best guess” estimates of the extent of the outbreak to hospitals and health professionals as part of the AHA webinar called What Healthcare Leaders Need to Know: Preparing for the COVID-19 on February 26.

These documents paint a bleaker picture for those who are over the age of 60. According to the leaked documents:

"People aged 80 and over have a 14.8% chance of dying if they contract the infection, the slides revealed. The risk declines with youth, though those aged 70-79 and 60-69 are still placed at a significant risk, with 8% and 3.6% mortality rates respectively." –Business Insider

Additionally, it’s worth noting that Dr. Lawler’s estimate of 480,000 deaths would indicate a death rate of just half a percent (0.5%), which is significantly lower than death rates being reported by the WHO (3.4%) and the nation of Italy (5%). If the death rate in the United States reached just 2% while 96 million Americans are infected, that would result in 1.92 million deaths.

The United States has fewer than one million hospital beds, and they are typically around 75% occupied by existing patients, unrelated to the coronavirus. Natural News has calculated that U.S. hospital beds will be overrun by May 30th if nothing is done to stop the exponential spread of the coronavirus.

Mike Adams, aka, the Health Ranger at Natural News, has a new video out presenting the math and statistics found in these leaked documents.

"If you want to die, heed the advice of Mike Pence and do nothing to prepare for the pandemic. The Surgeon General also hopes you stop buying protecting gear so that you get infected and die more quickly, thereby making more protective equipment available to the government which is stockpiling like mad at this very minute." –Mike Adams, Natural News

As Alt-Market's Brandon Smith notes, it is also likely that hospitals are prepping for only 480,000 deaths because that is the maximum number of terminally ill patients their facilities can handle anyway.

If Italy is any indication and this virus does not burn out soon, the death rate will probably be between 3%-5%. The real number of infected versus dead will not be accurately calculated for another year at least...




-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 7:56 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN



This site
https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/
now says 12% of Active Cases are critical/serious, 6% of Closed cases are fatal.


DP cases have 7 deaths. 245 recovered, 32 serious/critical.

USA surpassed Diamond Princess for 8th place.
Japan seems ready to jump past Diamond Princess for 9th place.

US is in 8th place, with 975 cases and 15 recoveries. 30 deaths.

Canada is 24th place, with 94 cases, 8 recoveries. 1 death.







Separately, Here in WI we have 2 new cases, up from 0 active. In Pierce Co and Dane Co (Madison.) Both cases are from traveling in America.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:02 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
The buss transmission could be from grabbing the headrests/handbars while entering/exiting, and cornering while moving. That would explain a lot of that diagram.

That doesn't explain the people ahead of him. Presumably they exited before he did since he was in the back of the bus, and on the bus for the whole ride.

The spreader was sick when he got on. If he touched the headrest/handbar on his 2nd or 3rd step (regain balance - and folk with ear/nose/throat issues can be off-balance), that is reasonable. If a 2nd-row passenger got on after him, got back on after him (after toileting), they could have touched the same spot after he did. Or have been sitting in the seat where he touched the headrest/handbar.
With many folk of the same community perhaps being similar size and stride, touching the same one spot is not all that unusual.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:13 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


So...

Nobody has answered my question yet.

Did 15 elderly people in a home in Seattle die of COVID or not?

That's at least half, or possibly more than half of the supposed deaths recorded so far, depending on the source.

Has anybody else even heard of this story?

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:14 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
My old man said he saw on the news that 15 people died the other day in an old folks home in Seattle from COVID.

I told him that I've heard no such thing. JSF is saying that there are 19 confirmed deaths, just like I read the other day as well.

Has anybody heard this old folks home story?


I told him not to believe anything the news is saying about any of this until at least a week later because they don't do any due diligence and just report on anything that stokes TDS before they figure out if there is any truth to it or not.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

Some pertinent links are in this thread.

Keep in mind I have limited board access now, and even just looking at sites has slowed down a bunch this month. So, not only are numbers changing rapidly, but my posts might not bee completely edited right away, particularly if the time stamp is :54 or :55 after the hour.
Currently, the update I just posted is edited and correct.

The first death in America was in WA State. Near this old folks home. Something like the next 10-12 deaths in America were also in WA state, in or associated with this facility. Many of the reports at the time were unclear or conflicting. After the 1st death, the others from this old folks home were not known to have it (until deaath/autopsy), and are considered "community spread" because they have not traced the sourcing of these contacts. The 1st death and the others are listed as being in 2 different counties, but the 2 sites are something like a few miles apart from each other, just in a different county. After something like 12 or 13 deaths, there was finally a death in CA, the first outside of WA.
So, the news that your dad summarized is likely fully accurate and true, I just don't have the exact details anymore - the American cases have gotten out of control.
In addition to staff and residents of the home, at least 2 firefighters who helped evacuate the facility are now in quarantine. I also hear that the facility BOUGHT some nearby hotel to use as emergency quarantine quarters to separate/isolate/protect the residents who had been at the home.


I think the 2nd death in America was around 29 Feb. And it was the first death from this facility, IIRC.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:16 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
The spreader was sick when he got on. If he touched the headrest/handbar on his 2nd or 3rd step (regain balance - and folk with ear/nose/throat issues can be off-balance), that is reasonable. If a 2nd-row passenger got on after him, got back on after him (after toileting), they could have touched the same spot after he did. Or have been sitting in the seat where he touched the headrest/handbar.
With many folk of the same community perhaps being similar size and stride, touching the same one spot is not all that unusual.

Well, they indicated that they have video. So if they say aerosol, I'd think they're the ones in the best position to determine that.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:25 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 1KIKI:
Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
The spreader was sick when he got on. If he touched the headrest/handbar on his 2nd or 3rd step (regain balance - and folk with ear/nose/throat issues can be off-balance), that is reasonable. If a 2nd-row passenger got on after him, got back on after him (after toileting), they could have touched the same spot after he did. Or have been sitting in the seat where he touched the headrest/handbar.
With many folk of the same community perhaps being similar size and stride, touching the same one spot is not all that unusual.

Well, they indicated that they have video. So if they say aerosol, I'd think they're the ones in the best position to determine that.

I'd go along with the concept of aerosol, but I'd be reticent to bet the farm on the assumption.
That sampling of rooms of infected patients had only 2 spot tested which were not positive, and they were both in the bathroom. The air samples were all nada. The toilet BOWL was positive. I just get the sense that shared surface contact is much more prevalent as cause than many folk are realizing.
Also, I am not in Wuhan. I am not in WA. I am not withing 120 miles of a known case. I could even be in Russia, sitting next to you. I was just positing an observation. I encourage learned individuals to ignore my input on this matter.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:30 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


FWIW, I did go to the local hardware store today to pick up some things, and I was going to buy some masks for some upcoming drywall work/mudding/sanding down the pipe and they're completely out of stock.

I won't need them for a while and I'm sure they'll be back in stock, but I got a chuckle out of that.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:38 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
Yes. Do a lot of research yourself about fake research that fake people did about a fake virus, JSF.

Or just drop it and let people live with their delusions. You or anybody you care about will never get AIDS because AIDS doesn't get anybody.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

Not exactly a lot of research to do, as you seem probably aware.

Most of the facts have been scrubbed from the web. Remember, algore invented the internet long after the AIDS Religion was firmly entrenched. Books were immediately banned and censored by gays and liberals at the time of their publication, let alone trying to find them now. My books are currently disorganized and unfindable, and so I cannot find the references within them. So, research is not really needed as much as, say, just knowing the information already. Google ain't gonna help at all.

I fully agree that the virus does exist, and has for centuries. There were actual people involved, although they were largely faking their work, their results, their claims, and their actions may have been fake, in the slang sense. But with "fake research," you nailed it.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:42 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
FWIW, I did go to the local hardware store today to pick up some things, and I was going to buy some masks for some upcoming drywall work/mudding/sanding down the pipe and they're completely out of stock.

I won't need them for a while and I'm sure they'll be back in stock, but I got a chuckle out of that.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

I heard that as of a week ago, Home Depot was cleaned out of everything related, like soap, sanitizer, etc.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 8:54 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


I am wondering about some things, and I have a suggestion for those of you in the forefront.

I suggest if somebody knowledgeable mentions that these are bad ideas, take heed of them.

If masks are scarce, can they be cleaned? It sounds like exposure to alcohol is what kills the virus - not sure how many seconds of contact are needed. So, could dunking your used mask in IPA and letting it dry clean it?

Whether for your mask, or for cleaning your glasses, or other items:
I used to work with cleaners and solutions which were highly evaporative. But I disliked wasting the cleaning/soaking solution, or getting called away and return some time later to find the soaking was all evaporated.

To save or not waste your cleaning solution: cut out the bottom of a bottle, like a flat bottomed bottle. Place your items to clean inside the "cup" and fill with IPA until submerged. Place the entire affair inside a Zip-lock bag of appropriate size. Close the zip=lock, and at the final inch push out all of the air, so that the evaporation is minimized.

For glassses, get a oblng gallon jug, shaped like anitfreeze jugs. leave the handle fully intact on top, and the bottom couple inches also. cut out panels on eah side from about 3 inches

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 9:22 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
I'd go along with the concept of aerosol, but I'd be reticent to bet the farm on the assumption.

There's no downside to at least provisionally accepting ACTUAL DATA, or erring on the side of caution.
Quote:

That sampling of rooms of infected patients had only 2 spot tested which were not positive, and they were both in the bathroom. The air samples were all nada.
But the exhaust vent was positive. I'm not sure you understand what that means. The rooms are kept at negative pressure, to keep infectious agents from blowing outward whenever the door is opened. They do that by sucking up and exhausting room - contaminated - air. That the exhaust vent was contaminated indicates the room air was contaminated. It's entirely possible that with enough airflow, not enough virus remained in the room air to detect.
Quote:

The toilet BOWL was positive. I just get the sense that shared surface contact is much more prevalent as cause than many folk are realizing.
I never ruled it out. In fact I said it was more important than aerosol.
Quote:

Also, I am not in Wuhan. I am not in WA. I am not withing 120 miles of a known case.
I am.
Quote:

I was just positing an observation.
No, you were making shit up.
Quote:

I encourage learned individuals to ignore my input on this matter.
As should everyone else, at this point, since you've proved you have nothing but bullshit to offer.


You know, I'm not an expert. But I have much more experience than you. I've worked with pathogens that required working under those specialty hoods you see on TV but probably never understood what they are (for the record - laminar flow hoods). I've worked under medical/ research positive isolation and reverse isolation. I've needed serious PPE (personal protective equipment) in some jobs. I've even worked in negative pressure rooms to keep contaminants from escaping. So I feel reasonably capable of gauging my own risk in my environment using available data, and selecting my options using my various experiences. If you want to discuss, let's discuss based on FACTS instead of bullshit.

But if you feel you must bullshit to try and win a point, maybe you should reevaluate your level of knowledge.

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Tuesday, March 10, 2020 9:42 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Yanno JSF - what I don't understand about your HIV/ AIDS information is why you think 40 or 30 year old books are still definitive about anything.

First of all, I genuinely applaud what seems to be your sincere interest in learning.

But time moves on. Research advances. Ambiguities are cleared up, questions are answered, data is confirmed. Especially nowadays, the march of science, especially biological/ medical science, is pretty relentless. A lot of stuff from even a few years ago has already been left behind.

Early information you might have had about HIV/ AIDS is even further back in ancient times.


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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 8:22 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


see latest post for most recent figures

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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 10:59 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:

‘Containment Area’ Is Ordered for New Rochelle Coronavirus Cluster

Schools and other buildings in the city, the center of the state’s outbreak, will be shut, and the National Guard will help distribute food and clean.

I hope the National Guard has respirators and decontamination procedures, otherwise they, too, can become a new vector!

And just think of our military stationed abroad ... all of those bases in the Far East, the Mideast, and Europe. If everyone is living on base it seems the virus could EASILY spread among the soldiers!

Our diplomats/CIA ... the well-heeled/well-travelled ... bankers, politicians ...

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!

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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 12:08 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Here's one reason why numbers are going up as slowly as they are:

https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2020-03-11/coronavirus-spread
ing-rapidly-in-california-from-airports-to-elder-care-facilities


"Beilenson said Tuesday that all patients in the nursing home would be tested for the virus, but that effort was delayed by a lack of test kits. He said the county has access to only 20 tests per day and is having to ration those between possible cases in the community and medical professionals who may have been exposed."

Quote:

Coronavirus spreading rapidly in California, from airports to elder-care facilities


By Anita Chabria, Colleen Shalby, Melody Gutierrez, Taryn Luna
March 11, 2020
8:43 AM
SACRAMENTO —

With coronavirus cases spreading rapidly across California, including the death Tuesday of a woman at a senior living facility, officials are saying it’s increasingly unlikely they can contain the virus and instead are focusing on slowing its spread.

“The community spread has already occurred,” said Peter Beilenson, Sacramento County’s health director.

An elderly patient in a northern California assisted living facility died of the novel coronavirus, sparking fears of an outbreak among other residents there and renewing concerns about statewide availability of testing kits.

Sacramento County health officials announced Tuesday that a patient in her 90s was the county’s first fatality from COVID-19.

The woman was among about 140 patients of the facility in Elk Grove, the same suburb where all public schools were closed this week after two family members with students at multiple sites tested positive for the coronavirus. Yesterday, the district announced that an elementary-age student in that family had also tested positive.

Beilenson said Tuesday that all patients in the nursing home would be tested for the virus, but that effort was delayed by a lack of test kits. He said the county has access to only 20 tests per day and is having to ration those between possible cases in the community and medical professionals who may have been exposed.

“It has been very frustrating because we have been stuck now for a couple of weeks with just 20 tests a day,” Beilenson said.

Beilenson said other residents of the Elk Grove facility are now subject to special protective measures, including having meals delivered to rooms and not being allowed to congregate in communal areas.

Gov. Gavin Newsom said Tuesday that California has 157 confirmed cases of COVID-19 and that thousands of residents may have come into contact with the disease. The United States has surpassed 1,000 coronavirus cases, with most in Washingon state, New York and California.

The governor said more than 1,075 Californians have been tested for the coronavirus at 18 labs across the state. The state is monitoring an additional 10,300 individuals who returned to California on international flights and may have been exposed, he said. Many others who have interacted with infected people are being advised to self-monitor and quarantine at home.

The largest outbreak of the illness is in Santa Clara County, where there have been 45 positive cases confirmed. On late Tuesday, officials announced that three TSA agents at Mineta San Jose International Airport tested positive. Two screeners at Los Angeles International Airport also have the coronavirus.

In Los Angeles County, Barbara Ferrer, director of the county’s Department of Public Health, said her agency is focused on slowing the spread of COVD-19 but is combining mitigation efforts with containment.

But public health officials in Placer and Yolo counties, which neighbor Sacramento to the northeast and west, have announced a shift from trying to contain the virus to accepting that it is spreading too fast for widespread quarantining measures. Seven people in Placer County have tested positive, including a Rocklin man who died last week. Yolo County has one confirmed case.

Under the new recommendations in Placer and Yolo counties, which are effective through March 31, individuals who have come in contact with a confirmed or suspected case of coronavirus will no longer be required to be quarantined for 14 days. Instead, persons with cold-like symptoms, regardless of whether they have the coronavirus or flu, are asked to self-quarantine and manage their symptoms with over-the-counter drugs.

The counties also said that while they have tests for COVID-19, they will be reserved for those with more serious symptoms,because mild symptoms are treated the same regardless of the diagnosis. The counties urged businesses to allow employees to telecommute where possible and for large events to be postponed or canceled.

Aimee Sisson, Placer County’s public health director, said the county will continue to do some tracing of anyone who comes in contact with the virus, but it will only screen for high-risk situations, such as a person who visited a nursing home or came in contact with an immune-compromised individual.

Widespread quarantine measures can’t be sustained, Sisson said, especially for healthcare workers. California already is taxed with a shortage of medical providers, and forcing quarantines on front-line staff is a burden the system can’t bear as the virus spreads.

If counties keep quarantining healthcare workers for potential exposure, “we wouldn’t have any healthcare workers left,” she said.

Sisson said the county does not have the capacity to continue to trace every contact because it lacks the manpower, even with an offer from the state for additional help.

“Even a handful of cases tested our capacity,” she said.


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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 12:23 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


What's with the lack of test kits???

Supposedly they were distributed last week, totaling up to 1.5 million individual tests (roughly 450,000 patients) and THIS week 78 public health labs were certified.

So WTF??

yes, I know ... it's hard to get big programs going at the drop of a hat. This speaks to the slow strangulation of governmental science and medicine by previous Presidents over various terms of office ... but still. Is this deliberate or just mind-blowingly incompetent??



-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!

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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 1:30 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


I wish I knew. But I opine it's some massive FUBAR.

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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 1:37 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
So...

Nobody has answered my question yet.

Did 15 elderly people in a home in Seattle die of COVID or not?

That's at least half, or possibly more than half of the supposed deaths recorded so far, depending on the source.

Has anybody else even heard of this story?

Do Right, Be Right. :)



Yes, they did Jack. I was watching some American news from Washington state last Saturday and there were the deaths.

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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 1:55 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


https://edition.cnn.com/world/live-news/coronavirus-outbreak-03-11-20-
intl-hnk/index.html


World Health Organization declares coronavirus a pandemic





There goes those pandemic bonds!

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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 5:22 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/next-major-roadblock-white-hous
es-coronavirus-response

https://www.politico.com/news/2020/03/10/coronavirus-testing-lab-mater
ials-shortage-125212

Exclusive: U.S. coronavirus testing threatened by shortage of critical lab materials
A looming shortage in lab materials is threatening to delay coronavirus test results and cause officials to undercount the number of Americans with the virus.
The slow pace of coronavirus testing has created a major gap in the U.S. public health response. The latest problem involves an inability to prepare samples for testing, creating uncertainties in how long it will take to get results.
Qiagen*, a major supplier of the kits, confirmed that its product is backordered due to “the extraordinary pace” at which the world has increased coronavirus testing over the last few weeks.
Complicating the situation, most labs have been running at least two tests per patient - although that could soon change. The CDC issued interim guidelines on Monday that minimize the number of tests required for a diagnosis. The agency says labs can combine a patient’s nose and throat samples into one test, a move experts say will cut in half the amount of supplies used to test each person.



* Originally a Chinese company currently owned by Thermo-Fisher, it appears mfg is still in China. information in post below

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Wednesday, March 11, 2020 6:15 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


https://www.bbc.com/news/world-us-canada-51761435
6 March 2020 (last Friday)
At a press briefing on Monday, Food and Drug Administration Commissioner Stephan Hahn said close to a million tests would be ready by the end of this week.
(But) Vice-President Mike Pence said the Trump administration would not be able to meet its objective of delivering one million testing kits this week.
But he said that by the end of next week the US government's diagnostic supplier would distribute kits across the country that would enable 1.2 million Americans to be tested for coronavirus.


https://www.sacbee.com/news/local/health-and-medicine/article241018106
.html

March 09, 2020 04:00 AM (this week Monday)
The leader of Sacramento County’s Department of Health Services said Sunday that physicians in the Sacramento region will have greater access to testing for COVID-19 starting Monday because LabCorp and Quest Diagnostics will have approval to do the analyses locally.
Dr. Peter Beilenson said the local laboratory has been constrained because it hasn’t been able to get more testing kits from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
“We have 20 tests that we can do a day,” he said. “We’re obviously full every day. ... It’s clearly a shortcoming of the CDC, in terms of not having enough tests out there.”

https://news.yahoo.com/coronavirus-probe-california-nursing-home-21433
7786.html

By Dan Whitcomb, Reuters•March 11, 2020
The difficulties come as regulatory hurdles at the federal and state level as well as logistical and technical challenges have slowed the rollout of testing kits across the United States, according to healthcare providers, public health officials and test makers.
"We're using our own tests and California state tests to test as many patients as possible," Beilenson (Sacramento) said, adding that there may not be enough to cover everyone.

https://www.politico.com/states/california/story/2020/03/11/coronaviru
s-local-leadersfederal-direction-1266348

03/11/2020 08:00 AM EDT
“This has been mostly a state and local effort. The federal government has been sort of behind the times,” Beilenson (Sacramento) said, adding that “there clearly could have been testing kits available much more early than there were,” which means now “the entire country is” catching up.
Gov. J.B. Pritzker (Illinois) said “I am very frustrated with the federal government. We have not received enough tests. We’ve been told for days and that the commercial labs will be coming on line. Just again today I was told they’d be coming on line in a matter of days and we haven't seen it.”





https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/supply-chain/how-government-labs
-are-dealing-with-shortage-of-coronavirus-testing-kits.html


How government, labs are dealing with shortage of coronavirus testing kits
Maia Anderson - Wednesday, March 11th, 2020

As the U.S. is facing a shortage of a critical component of COVID-19 diagnostic tests, some labs are borrowing kits from colleagues, the FDA updated a policy allowing labs to use a different type of diagnostic kit and the CDC has offered to look into the shortage.
© Copyright ASC COMMUNICATIONS 2020.



Publication policy prevents me from reproducing the entire article.


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Thursday, March 12, 2020 12:13 AM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


Update (1522ET): LA County health officials announced on Wednesday that one of their patients had succumbed to the virus, marking the second death in California from the virus and the first in LA County, a local TV station reports. They also announced another 6 confirmed cases, bringing the county total to 27.
...

Beverly Hills priest diagnosed with coronavirus as L.A. County total hits 29

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 10:00 AM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


My old man said that last night there was only one bottle of Purel left on Amazon going for $60.

I guess people are just going to have to wash their hands with soap like normal human beings for now.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 1:05 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
My old man said that last night there was only one bottle of Purel left on Amazon going for $60.

I guess people are just going to have to wash their hands with soap like normal human beings for now.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

Not only is hand sanitizr missing, so is rubbing alcohol (the active ingredient). There's a lot of misinformation "out there" which results in people buying or making sanitizers with ineffective concentrations of alcohol, which is a great way to waste alcohol

Sanitizer is great for situations where you can't leave your work station (like assembly line), for high-contact jobs like receptionists, fast food, and cashiers, where you have close minute-by-minute contact with lots of people (like caregivers, EMTs etc) and aren't always near a sink or can't wash your hands every minute.

Same goes for masks (not even respirators) which at least keeps those people from touching their faces. Everyone who MUST work with a lot of people should have a mask and sanitizer at their work station. It just seems like a job requirement nowadays.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 2:20 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


see latest post for most recent figures

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 2:36 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


for Signy and me

http://www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus/

cases 28
deaths 1

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 3:04 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Quote:

Originally posted by 6IXSTRINGJACK:
My old man said that last night there was only one bottle of Purel left on Amazon going for $60.

I guess people are just going to have to wash their hands with soap like normal human beings for now.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

Not only is hand sanitizr missing, so is rubbing alcohol (the active ingredient). There's a lot of misinformation "out there" which results in people buying or making sanitizers with ineffective concentrations of alcohol, which is a great way to waste alcohol

Sanitizer is great for situations where you can't leave your work station (like assembly line), for high-contact jobs like receptionists, fast food, and cashiers, where you have close minute-by-minute contact with lots of people (like caregivers, EMTs etc) and aren't always near a sink or can't wash your hands every minute.

Same goes for masks (not even respirators) which at least keeps those people from touching their faces. Everyone who MUST work with a lot of people should have a mask and sanitizer at their work station. It just seems like a job requirement nowadays.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

Happy New Year, WISHY. I edited out your psychopathic screed!




It's more important for people who are doing a bathroom remodel from the 60's or 70's to have a mask.

How many bathrooms were remodeled this week where the workers were exposed to asbestos and who knows what because they couldn't buy any?

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 3:18 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


There are 'respirators' like the N95 masks, and there are 'procedure' masks like this:



The 'procedure' masks keeps the person wearing them from infecting anyone else, they don't filter anything out of the air you breathe in like the N95 does. One is not like the other.

When it comes to coronavirus, aside from keeping people from giving infections to others, the 'procedure' masks area good way to keep people from touching their faces, which can keep them from infecting themselves through contaminated hands.

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 3:59 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/coronavirus-what-is-happening-in
-italy/#slide-1

Italy had 62 coronavirus cases on February 22, and two-and-half weeks later it has more than 10,000 cases, with more than 600 people dead and the country on lockdown. What happened?

What happened? Unlike here, Italy was able to mass-test whole swathes of the population. That's how the cases went up so dramatically. At a minimum, Italy tested 10,000 per week. If we were to be able to mass-test people, I wonder what our numbers would be. And then, of course, there was that explosive viral spread.

https://www.itv.com/news/2020-03-11/italy-doctors-coronavirus-covid-19
-quarantine-milan-health
/

https://www.euronews.com/2020/03/12/coronavirus-italy-doctors-forced-t
o-prioritise-icu-care-for-patients-with-best-chance-of-s


https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/11135177/italy-coronavirus-lockdown-pani
c-buying-looting
/

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8101135/Intensive-care-units-
stop-treating-elderly-coronavirus-outbreak-worsens.html

Italy announces all shops except pharmacies and food outlets will be CLOSED as coronavirus death toll climbs by 31% to 827 in 24 hours and intensive care units are advise to stop treating the elderly

https://www.businessinsider.com/medical-staff-frontlines-of-italy-coro
navirus-outbreak-work-days-2020-3






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Thursday, March 12, 2020 5:43 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


https://www.cedars-sinai.org/newsroom/study-estimates-covid-19-may-hav
e-infected-over-9000-in-us
/
https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/coronavirus-what-is-happening-in
-italy/#slide-1

Italy had 62 coronavirus cases on February 22, and two-and-half weeks later it has more than 10,000 cases, with more than 600 people dead and the country on lockdown. What happened?

What happened? Unlike here, Italy was able to mass-test whole swathes of the population. That's how the cases went up so dramatically. At a minimum, Italy tested 10,000 per week. If we were to be able to mass-test people, I wonder what our numbers would be. And then, of course, there was that explosive viral spread.

Can we expect even adequte testing capacity anytime soon?

It looks like no.


https://www.newsmax.com/us/anthony-fauci-testing-system-cdc/2020/03/12
/id/958093
/
Dr. Anthony Fauci: US Virus Testing System Is 'Failing'

"The system is not really geared to what we need right now; that is a failing, let's admit it," Dr. Anthony Fauci of the National Institutes of Health told a House committee hearing Thursday. "The idea of anybody getting it easily the way people in other countries are doing it, we're not set up for that. Do I think we should be? Yes. But we're not."

The effort initially was hobbled by delays in getting testing kits out to public health labs, but the stumbles have continued, leading scientists to conclude that the virus has already spread far wider than government officials are reporting.

U.S. health officials, for example, promised nearly a month ago to tap into a national network of labs that monitor for flu. That system still isn’t up and running.

Large-scale testing is a critical part of tracking the spread of infectious diseases and allocating resources for treatment. The lack of comprehensive figures means U.S. health providers could quickly be overwhelmed by undetected cases.

As of Thursday afternoon, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention was reporting about 1,260 U.S. illnesses — a number that trailed independent researchers, who are adding reports from individual states more quickly.

But some experts believe any number based on test results of individual patients is a dramatic undercount. Researchers at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles this week estimated that the true count of infections was close to 9,000 — about two weeks ago.

"I expect there are more infected individuals now," said one of the researchers, Dr. Jonathan Braun. "This means that the level of disease in the U.S. is much greater than has been reported by actual testing."

The problem, these experts say: the U.S. simply is not testing enough people.

There are no official numbers from the federal government on the country's overall testing capacity. One of the only comprehensive estimates comes from Dr. Scott Gottlieb, the former FDA commissioner who is now a resident fellow at the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank.

As of Thursday, his group estimated U.S. labs could process results for more than 20,000 patient per day. The figure is based on a combination of publicly reported information and historical estimates from government, private and academic labs. It reflects the total number of patient results that could be processed in a day, not the current number being run.

Whatever the actual number, the U.S. effort is trailing other nations.

South Korea, a country one-sixth the size of the U.S. in terms of population, is reportedly testing 15,000 people per day. CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield noted that officials there are using automated, high-volume testing systems capable of processing thousands of samples at a time. In contrast, the equipment used by most U.S. state and local labs requires technicians to manually process each sample in small batches, sometimes 100 or fewer per day.

The testing process in the U.S. requires mixing various chemicals to setup chain reactions that extract genetic information from patients' swabs. Each lab must fine-tune the process on its own equipment, something experts have likened to perfecting a new recipe.

Unlike countries with centralized, government-based health care systems, the U.S. response is fragmented between public labs and private efforts by hospitals, universities and diagnostic companies.

U.S. officials have boasted of shipping well over 1 million tests to labs across the country. But it is unclear how many have actually been used on patients, because tests have gone out to private labs and hospitals that do not report into the CDC, Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar told reporters earlier this week.

Azar said the government is working to setup a data system to combine government testing figures with those of large companies like Quest Diagnostics.

Government officials have pledged that these private testing companies would drastically expand U.S. capacity. But a Quest spokeswoman Wednesday said it could take up to six weeks to ramp up to testing tens of thousands of samples per week.

On Feb. 14, the CDC's Dr. Nancy Messonnier said the agency was "in the coming weeks" going to use labs in five cities to provide a good look at whether coronavirus might be appearing. The idea: When patients tested negative for flu, their specimens would go through coronavirus testing to see if the new bug was what had been causing their flu-like symptoms.

"Results from this surveillance would be an early warning signal, to trigger a change in our response strategy" if cases started appearing, she said. CDC officials subsequently said the number would be expanded beyond five.

But nearly four weeks later, doctors and scientists are still awaiting news that the surveillance system is up and running. This week, health officials in Hawaii said they planned to begin randomly testing negative flu samples in that state for the new coronavirus.

CDC officials have for weeks declined to detail why the system has been delayed, leaving experts mystified.

Dr. Jeffrey Engel is executive director of an organization of disease investigators, the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists.

"I don't know" why the system is not running, Engel said this week. "I'm eager to find out."

What a shit show.

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 7:18 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 7:34 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN



This site
https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/
now says 10% of Active Cases are critical/serious, 7% of Closed cases are fatal.


11th ranked Diamond Princess cases have 7 deaths. 325 recovered, 32 serious/critical.

Switzerland, Norway have surpassed Diamond Princess.
Japan, Sweden, Denmark, Netherlands, UK seem ready to jump past Diamond Princess.

US is in 8th place, with 1,679 cases and 30 recoveries. 40 deaths.

Canada is 24th place, with 142 cases, 11 recoveries. 1 death.




I would like to point out that, of locations on this list with more than 100 cases, US, Canada, and Maylaysia have the lowest per capita cases.

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 7:42 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


JSF, thanks for the updates!

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Thursday, March 12, 2020 7:48 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Separately, Here in WI we have 2 new cases, up from 0 active. In Pierce Co and Dane Co (Madison.) Both cases are from traveling in America.

In Pierce County, River Falls is a University of Wisconsin campus in the far west of the state, near Minneapolis.
These 2 cases were from travelling in unspecified locations in America, but both were in spots with current community spread (CA, WA, NYC).


Yesterday 3 more cases in WI. 2 in Fond Du Lac County (south end of Lake Winnebago) and 1 in Waukesha Co (western suburbs of Milwaukee, and wealthiest County in WI - a Firefly restaurant is there.) 1 of the FDL cases was from travel in US, the other 2 were from international travel to known hot spots.

Today 2 more cases, in Dane Co, both having contact with the 2nd WI case, found earlier this week in Dane Co (Madison).




But this warms my heart.
https://www.tmj4.com/news/national/coronavirus/wisconsin-national-guar
d-mobilized-to-transport-37-wisconsinites-on-board-grand-princess-cruise-ship

Saving Wisconsinites from the horrors of California.

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Elections 2020
Tue, June 2, 2020 10:32 - 578 posts
Long hot summer ... of riots
Tue, June 2, 2020 09:27 - 45 posts
Number 1 Cause of Deaths? The US had 1,970 coronavirus deaths in last 24 hours, making it (as of today) the #1 cause of death in the USA
Tue, June 2, 2020 08:23 - 20 posts
A thread for Democrats Only
Tue, June 2, 2020 05:48 - 3447 posts
In the garden, and RAIN!!!!
Tue, June 2, 2020 04:48 - 4612 posts
Just what IS the point?
Tue, June 2, 2020 02:47 - 3 posts
Thoughts for Nova Scotia
Mon, June 1, 2020 23:52 - 8 posts
new deadly human-to-human-transmissible coronavirus emerges out of China
Mon, June 1, 2020 18:10 - 1686 posts
Some Covid-19 thoughts
Mon, June 1, 2020 14:11 - 702 posts
The United States of America will be designating ANTIFA as a Terrorist Organization.
Mon, June 1, 2020 14:09 - 5 posts
Buildings are ablaze a mere block from the WH. Fire breaks out near Hay Adams Hotel. National Guard Called up
Mon, June 1, 2020 14:08 - 5 posts
You can't take the sky from me, a tribute to Firefly
Mon, June 1, 2020 09:42 - 244 posts

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