OTHER SCIENCE FICTION SERIES

Classic SF Lit Fans?

POSTED BY: ZISKER
UPDATED: Sunday, May 28, 2006 16:39
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Saturday, April 29, 2006 2:07 PM

ZISKER


Hey, anyone else here crack open an Asimov, Bradbury, Clarke or Kornbluth now and again? Do Dick and Ellison do it for ya? Is Pohl or Tiptree where it's at?

My favorite classic is Bradbury's The Martian Chronicles because it brought me into science fiction. I think the most mind-bending short I've read recently is Revolt of the Pedestrians - it was written in 1928 and deals with themes of socialism, homosexuality, Darwinism and a whole host of goodness that makes me think David H. Keller, MD (interesting he included that . . .) was a bloody genius or he shared River's 'special vision'.

Any other old school fans? Any good recommendations?

One day.
One plan.
One army of Browncoats.

On June 23rd, we aim to misbehave.
http://www.serenityday.org/

Little or no free time, but want to help?
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Saturday, April 29, 2006 2:20 PM

ECGORDON

There's no place I can be since I found Serenity.


If you really want to try some heady older stuff, pick up Olaf Stapledon's Star Maker or Last and First Men. There are so many concepts in those books (written in the 30s) they could keep a hundred other writers busy for years expanding on some of the ideas.

As for more accessible, but still classic, SF, I whole-heartedly recommend Alfred Bester's The Stars My Destination (1957), probably the best "mainstream" science fiction novel I've ever read, even better than his earlier The Demolished Man, which won the first ever Hugo award.




wo men ren ran zai fei xing.

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Sunday, April 30, 2006 6:46 PM

SPACEMANSPIFF


Man, yes. It's great to look back at the sci-fi that we consider cliche' when they were amazing and new ideas that no one had considered.

Asimov's "The Time Machine" is incredible.

More recent, but still a hard sci-fi classic is Niven's "Ringworld" (heck, all of Known Space is fantastic).

Did he just go crazy and fall asleep?

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Monday, May 1, 2006 1:21 PM

RYCE


I gotta go with Frank Herbert's Dune. Finally got it on audiobook, too!

No power in the 'verse can stop me!

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 7:33 AM

SICKDUDE


If you want a time intensive treat, check out the complete collected short stories of Theodore Sturgeon that were just released recently and are chronologically ordered. There are ten volumes, although there may be one or two left. Not only do they publish everything he ever wrote novella or shorter, but they have great commentaries in the notes! You really get a sense of the evolution of one of SF's greatest writers. He wrote from 1945-1970ish, and everybody admired him: Asimov, Anderson, Campbell, Stephen King, etc. He truly had a great artistic way with words. And by book 2 or 3 you can see some of his gems shine. Stories like "shottle bop", "killdozer", "a saucerful of loneliness", "Bianca's hands", "microcosmic god", "syzygy". Just WOW!

Also, I like one of the great-grandfathers of SF: Jack Williamson. Particularly "the humanoids".

And, more recently, Stanislaw Lem for "Pirx the pilot", "Solaris", and the out-of-print "the Invicible" (his best one).

"I am your father, Luke. Give in to the Dark Side, you nob!" - Doug McKenzie

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 8:23 AM

ZISKER


You know, Sturgeon has always been hit or miss for me. I really loved A Saucer of Loneliness, Yesterday Was Monday and Ether Breather - but I could never get into his style of writing. Same thing with Bester.

I would like to read those commentaries though . . .thanks for the tip!

One day.
One plan.
One army of Browncoats.

On June 23rd, we aim to misbehave.
http://www.serenityday.org/

Little or no free time, but want to help?
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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 9:18 AM

SICKDUDE


No problem! Keep in mind that much of the (early) stuff in the first few volumes is not his best. It takes him a few years to get into gear. He was definately in the "What do I need to write so I can buy groceries?" stage. But it does provide an interesting timeline.

ETA: And I have to disagree, by the way. Disregarding such things as plot and character, his strongpoint is actually 'word-smithing'. Usage of words and imagery. Pay close attention as you read some of his lines. Just his opening sentences alone!!!

"I am your father, Luke. Give in to the Dark Side, you nob!" - Doug McKenzie

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 9:32 AM

STILLTHEREWAITING


I recently re-read the Foundation Trilogy that I first read in the early '60s. Still as great as ever. I loved Asimov's and Clarke's early stuff. The original Daneel Olivaw robot detective stories (Naked Sun, etc) and Clarks "The City and the Stars", among others. I was also quite partial to E.E. Doc Smith's series (Triplanetary, etc). The precursor to Weber's Honor Harrington as far as space warfare is concerned.
I recently started cataloguing my library using ReaderWare software which allows the entry of a list of ISBNs or LCCN by hand or UPC scanner. It then goes to the 'Net and gets all of the relevant data about the books. I quite quickly discovered that many of my Sci-Fi books predate ISBN forcing me to enter all of the data manually, or try to find the particular edition on-line and import it.

Laugh while you can, monkey-boy.

If I were you, I'd run!
If you were me, you'd be good-looking

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 9:51 AM

ONETOOMANY


I would have to say Heinlein hands down. While I deffintly admoire & enjoy writers like Herbert, Pohl, Asimov, Clarke, Wells. There's something about Heinlein & the way he draws you in by making you love the characters. He just writes a good all around story. Granted some of his stuff goes pretty far into technical facts (for the era. He would always correct his figures & facts in later publications of the same storys)
That detail is what makes it more real, because almost all of it is based on actual people, events, data, & theories. A usually fatal flaw.

Pick up "Tunnel in the Sky" pub. 1955. It's all about survival & pioneering other planets using old west horse & wagon train techniques.(sound familiar)
or "Starship Troopers" pub. 1959 THE BOOK NOT THE BDM. Which have nothing in but names in common. It poses questions like should a person not willing to work in civil service (not necessarily just the military but something) should be able to vote.

Notice anythig particular 'bout our luck these past few days, any kind'a pattern'. You depend on luck you end up on the drift no fuel, no prospects, beggin for alliance make work getiin' towed off to the scrap out THAT AIN'T US NOT EVER

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 10:23 AM

ZISKER


Quote:

Originally posted by Sickdude:
No problem! Keep in mind that much of the (early) stuff in the first few volumes is not his best. It takes him a few years to get into gear. He was definately in the "What do I need to write so I can buy groceries?" stage. But it does provide an interesting timeline.

ETA: And I have to disagree, by the way. Disregarding such things as plot and character, his strongpoint is actually 'word-smithing'. Usage of words and imagery. Pay close attention as you read some of his lines. Just his opening sentences alone!!!

"I am your father, Luke. Give in to the Dark Side, you nob!" - Doug McKenzie




Oh, it wasn't that I couldn't appreciate his word-smithing as an English major, but it didn't "speak" to me. Like Hemmingway. God, I hate Hemmingway. But back to Sturgeon - for some reason, the plots were what made his stories for me, not the wording. One of those oddities of the reader, I suppose. I had the same reaction with Bradbury - his most beautiful writing failed to move me if I just couldn't get into the story.

One day.
One plan.
One army of Browncoats.

On June 23rd, we aim to misbehave.
http://www.serenityday.org/

Little or no free time, but want to help?
Help Spread the Signal: http://www.geocities.com/browncoatsignalcorps

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 10:42 AM

ZISKER


Quote:

Originally posted by StillThereWaiting:
I recently re-read the Foundation Trilogy that I first read in the early '60s. Still as great as ever. I loved Asimov's and Clarke's early stuff. The original Daneel Olivaw robot detective stories (Naked Sun, etc) and Clarks "The City and the Stars", among others. I was also quite partial to E.E. Doc Smith's series (Triplanetary, etc). The precursor to Weber's Honor Harrington as far as space warfare is concerned.
I recently started cataloguing my library using ReaderWare software which allows the entry of a list of ISBNs or LCCN by hand or UPC scanner. It then goes to the 'Net and gets all of the relevant data about the books. I quite quickly discovered that many of my Sci-Fi books predate ISBN forcing me to enter all of the data manually, or try to find the particular edition on-line and import it.

Laugh while you can, monkey-boy.

If I were you, I'd run!
If you were me, you'd be good-looking





Whoa, whoa, whoa - tell me more about this shiny software. I'm currently using index cards. Does this actually allow you to database your collection in categories and what not or does it only get info off the web concerning the book?

One day.
One plan.
One army of Browncoats.

On June 23rd, we aim to misbehave.
http://www.serenityday.org/

Little or no free time, but want to help?
Help Spread the Signal: http://www.geocities.com/browncoatsignalcorps

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 12:12 PM

SICKDUDE


Quote:

Originally posted by Zisker:
Oh, it wasn't that I couldn't appreciate his word-smithing as an English major, but it didn't "speak" to me. Like Hemmingway. God, I hate Hemmingway. But back to Sturgeon - for some reason, the plots were what made his stories for me, not the wording. One of those oddities of the reader, I suppose. I had the same reaction with Bradbury - his most beautiful writing failed to move me if I just couldn't get into the story.



Oh, I got it now. Sorry. In fact, I will agree that his stories IN THEMSELVES were often not that engaging. Plus in general, it's hard to look backwards at these pioneers. They may have been introducing a standard SF concept, but since then it's probably been done better.

I'll chime in a second time for the Lem works I've mentioned above (but only those - his others get REALLY dry).

"I am your father, Luke. Give in to the Dark Side, you nob!" - Doug McKenzie

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Tuesday, May 2, 2006 12:25 PM

STILLTHEREWAITING


Go to http://www.readerware.com/

You can get a 30 day free trial. It's pretty good, although I have a couple of issues. When you auto-catalog from the 'net, it fills in the category column for you, and depending on which sites you are using for reference, the categories can be strange. All the fields are updateable though so it's not terrible.

Compared to keying in 3000 or so books, it's a godsend.

They also do DVD and CD cataloging software, and if you order all 3 they give you a bar-code reader. It's not the best reader, but with the gun type costing over $100, it's well worth it.

So far I've done about 140 books and maybe spent 30 minutes at it. Most of that is just waiting for the 'net searching. I'm skipping over the ones that require manual entry until I've done the rest.
It will also download the db to my Palm which may help my duplication problem.

BTW, I have no connection with the company other than as a client. There may be other software out there, but I couldn't find it.


Laugh while you can, monkey-boy.

If I were you, I'd run!
If you were me, you'd be good-looking

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Friday, May 5, 2006 4:57 PM

SOOTHSAYER


I second the motion on Frank Herbert's Dune and the rest of the series - the ones which he himself wrote that is.

And if you really want to hit the classics, look at Jules Verne and Edgar Allan Poe. I know Poe is mostly about short stories, but her sure wrote some good ones.

"And I believe there's a power greater than men. A power that heals."

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Friday, May 5, 2006 5:16 PM

STILLFLYIN


I'm an Asimov fan, Foundation and Lije Bailey serieses mostly, although I do break out the short stories from time to time. I especially recommend the Foundation novels. At first, I couldn't get into the first one, but when I picked it up on a trip, I couldn't put it down. However, I recommend reading the Lije Bailey series first as it is set earlier than the Foundations. I agree with ONETOOMANY, Starship Troopers (book) is definetly better than the movie and Tunnel in the sky is one of my favorites.

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Friday, May 5, 2006 5:23 PM

ONETOOMANY


Quote:

Originally posted by StillFlyin:
I agree with STILLTHEREWAITING, Starship Troopers (book) is definetly better than the movie and Tunnel in the sky is one of my favorites.



you mean ONETOOMANY ;p

Notice anythig particular 'bout our luck these past few days, any kind'a pattern'. You depend on luck you end up on the drift no fuel, no prospects, beggin for alliance make work getiin' towed off to the scrap out THAT AIN'T US NOT EVER

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Friday, May 5, 2006 5:25 PM

STILLFLYIN


Oops, please accept my apology.

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Friday, May 5, 2006 5:28 PM

ONETOOMANY


No worries ;)

Notice anythig particular 'bout our luck these past few days, any kind'a pattern'. You depend on luck you end up on the drift no fuel, no prospects, beggin for alliance make work getiin' towed off to the scrap out THAT AIN'T US NOT EVER

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Friday, May 5, 2006 5:32 PM

MIRAMEL


ok, im responding to the initial post, 'cause theres a whole bunch after it what i aitn particularly inclined to read (no offense, im just lazy)
anywho: im in a sf lit calss in school, in which we're reading almost all of that. tis shiny. (ok i guess i dont really have anything inteligent to say, i was just excited that i actually know what yer talking about)

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Saturday, May 6, 2006 4:00 PM

PLATONIST


Huxley, Herbert, Heinlein and Brunner(amazon or google him)

If you're very lucky... in that order...

Also, there is a "Hugo Award" Winner List book available: complete with original and current book reviews, author bios and story synopsises.




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Tuesday, May 9, 2006 5:13 AM

CHRISISALL


"This Perfect Day"- Ira Levin
"The Forever War"- Joe Haldeman
Anything (and I do mean anything) by Richard Matheson.

Chrisisall, who needs to read more

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Saturday, May 13, 2006 9:42 AM

BROWNCOATSANDINISTA


The Green Odessey. I forget who wrote it, but it is one of the most amazing SciFi Books ever imo. Newer stuff would be the Dune series ((Not the new ones mind)) and Starship Troopers. The Latter Blows the movie away in all things.

If anyone gets nosy...Shoot em.
Shoot em sir?
Politely.

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Saturday, May 13, 2006 11:12 AM

ZISKER


Quote:

Originally posted by BrowncoatSandinista:
The Green Odessey. I forget who wrote it, but it is one of the most amazing SciFi Books ever imo.



Philip Jose Farmer wrote it, and you can find it online for free at: http://www.litrix.com/godyssey/godys001.htm

Apparently the copyright expired - I'll have to give it a go-over once finals are done

One day.
One plan.
One army of Browncoats.

On June 23rd, we aim to misbehave.
http://www.serenityday.org/
http://forum.serenityday.org/

Little or no free time, but want to help?
Help Spread the Signal: http://www.geocities.com/browncoatsignalcorps

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Saturday, May 13, 2006 11:58 AM

TEELABROWN


Quote:

More recent, but still a hard sci-fi classic is Niven's "Ringworld" (heck, all of Known Space is fantastic).

I am, of course, going to have to agree with that. I like his Gil the ARM stories, too. And I bought a copy of The Mote in God's Eye, which I need to start reading.

Right now, I'm about 70 pages away from the end of Time Enough for Love, which is my first attempt at reading Heinlein, and I love it. And I've read some other of the classic SF writers, like 2001 and Tales From the White Hart from Clarke and The Gods Themselves from Asimov.

I also like some of Philip K. Dick's works, but I have a slight thing for ontology, so that's understandable. My favorite short story of his is The Chromium Fence but I also like Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, and Blade Runner, since the movie is based off of the book. It's not the truest following (they didn't have my faovrite part with the opera singer!), but it's still a well done film.

I like the "Phule's Company" series, which for the life I can't remember who wrote that.

And well-done time travel. Love it to death.

But, the best SF of all time for me is Douglas Adams. I've been reading (again) the Hitchhiker's Guide series, and my friend lent me the original radio program recordings. So, Douglas Adams all the friggin' way. I live on his writings. Don't know if he's considered classic, but it's definetly gold (or platinum) to me.

_____________
"Freedom is the Freedom to say that 2 plus 2 make 4. If that is granted, all else follows"-Winston, 1984
Teela Brown, keeper of the delete key.
"No one reads these things any way."- Bart on Blackboard

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Saturday, May 13, 2006 12:27 PM

CALHOUN


I've read and enjoyed lots of the books mentioned here over the years.
My sci-fi addiction began with E.E. Doc Smiths books. The Lensman series, The Family D'Alembert Series and the Skylark series truly captured my imagination.

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Saturday, May 13, 2006 6:48 PM

SPACEMANSPIFF


With a handle like yours, Teela, I would expect no less. You don't have that luck gene, do you?

If you really like Niven's work, try and find "Inferno". It's a modernized (well, from the late 70s, I think) version of Dante's Inferno, and it is excellent.

Did he just go crazy and fall asleep?

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Sunday, May 14, 2006 10:52 AM

TEELABROWN


Quote:

Originally posted by SpacemanSpiff:
With a handle like yours, Teela, I would expect no less. You don't have that luck gene, do you?


Unfortunately, no. But it's a dream...

I think there's a copy at the library, I'll go look it up!

_____________
"Freedom is the Freedom to say that 2 plus 2 make 4. If that is granted, all else follows"-Winston, 1984
Teela Brown, keeper of the delete key.
"No one reads these things any way."- Bart on Blackboard

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Friday, May 19, 2006 10:51 PM

SPACEANJL


To answer Teela - Phule books - Robert Asprin, except the last one co-written with a bloke called Heck.

New stuff - Richard Morgan (the Takeshi Kovacs stuff) or Neal Asher (The Skinner - mental)

Dune - the first, best and trippiest, though 'the Dosadi Experiment' is excellent. Without it, there would be no early Pratchett - read 'Dark Side of the Sun'

Heinlein and Haldeman for sure.

SpaceAnJL

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Saturday, May 20, 2006 5:48 AM

TEELABROWN


Quote:

Originally posted by SpaceAnJL:
To answer Teela - Phule books - Robert Asprin, except the last one co-written with a bloke called Heck.


Thanks! I just couldn't remember it...

_____________
"Freedom is the Freedom to say that 2 plus 2 make 4. If that is granted, all else follows"-Winston, 1984
Teela Brown, keeper of the delete key.
"No one reads these things any way."- Bart on Blackboard

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Saturday, May 20, 2006 6:19 AM

NUCLEARDAY


Good stuff in here. Got most of my sci-fi reading from my Dad's old collection. He went in for the military-sf stuff, so I've read tons of Poul Anderson, David Drake, and the like. Robert Asprin always cracks me up, too :)

Obviously, have to love Asimov, Bradbury, and Clarke...

Harry Harrison was always good. (Was a big fan of the Stainless Steel Rat books growing up.)

Went through a huge Harlan Ellison phase awhile back.

Philp K. Dick's still my one of my top ones though.

________________________________________________
You can take my hope when you pry it from my cold, dead fingers. (Or if Kaylee asks me nicely...)

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Sunday, May 21, 2006 1:51 AM

SPACEANJL


Jim DiGriz rocks.

Definitely check out Richard Morgan. There's a serious PKD/Ellison vibe in his work.

SpaceAnJL

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Tuesday, May 23, 2006 7:36 AM

ONETOOMANY


Quote:

Originally posted by TeelaBrown:
Right now, I'm about 70 pages away from the end of Time Enough for Love, which is my first attempt at reading Heinlein, and I love it.


Sorry for such a late response
If you like "time enough for love" then also read "Number Of The Beast","The Moon Is A Harsh Mistress","The Cat Who Walks Through Walls","Too Sail Beyond The Sunset"
That is of course if you havent already. I would suggest reading the in that order since they are part of a bigger story line. "Time Enoguh For Love" fits in the middle after "The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress" save "Too Sail Beyond The Sunset"
as it is the last Heinlein book ever written & wraps up all of the stories.
I actually haven't read it yet I'm saving it until I've read all of his works.

Notice anythig particular 'bout our luck these past few days, any kind'a pattern'. You depend on luck you end up on the drift no fuel, no prospects, beggin for alliance make work getiin' towed off to the scrap out THAT AIN'T US NOT EVER

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Tuesday, May 23, 2006 2:11 PM

RMMC


Whoo-hoo! Slippery Jim!

Yep, for me, Bradbury, (although I must confess, I prefer his horror to his SF) Philip K. Dick (Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?), Roger Zelazny (Doorways in the Sand, Jack of Shadows) and Heinlein.

A little more contemporary...James P. Hogan.

******
RMMC

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Wednesday, May 24, 2006 12:47 PM

TEELABROWN


Thanks! My dad has all the books (I think, he has at least three of them), and I haven't read them yet, so that's cool that I can do it in order.

_____________
"Freedom is the Freedom to say that 2 plus 2 make 4. If that is granted, all else follows"-Winston, 1984
Teela Brown, keeper of the delete key.
"No one reads these things any way."- Bart on Blackboard

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Sunday, May 28, 2006 4:39 PM

TRAVELER


You might like the author Felicity Savage. She wrote a two volume story "Humility Garden" and "Delta City". A lot of imagination in these books. It has gods and politics. You can't get a deadlier combination than that. Who's right who's wrong is hard to judge when everyone is so ruthless. But pity will get you killed and being a heretic is asking for a death sentence. I won't tell you more because I don't want to give anything away. Just beleave me when I say being blasted by a raygun would be perfered to to how some people end up in these books.

And what do we do with the chain of command?


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