OTHER SCIENCE FICTION SERIES

Lens Effect on TV

POSTED BY: JEWELSTAITEFAN
UPDATED: Friday, March 22, 2019 00:05
SHORT URL:
VIEWED: 169
PAGE 1 of 1

Saturday, March 2, 2019 1:15 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Has anybody else been noticing a TV image effect of past shows?
I keep seeing an image presentation that looks like Daytime Soap Opera. I've seen in on my own big screen TV, when watching reruns of The Good Wife. Lately I've also seen the same on other screens with NYPD Blue, but I don't see it on my own TV from broadcast. I also own this on DVD and never saw it then either.

I haven't seen this on Sci-Fi shows yet, but it seems a recent development.

Anybody else seen or noticed this?

The clarity I see on Buck Rogers and Star Trek TOS are different than I recall, but they do not look like Daytime Soap Opera.
It used to seem like Soaps were just more glitzy image treatment than pron, which might be why so many Soap players are also pron stars.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Sunday, March 10, 2019 11:22 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


To be clear, when I saw the treatment on The Good Wife, I thought it was a matter of lens selection at the time of filming, much like we've heard about Inara's bath scene in the Pilot. Because I had not seen these scenes of Good Wife before.
But when I saw the same treatment on NYPD Blue, which I have already seen, I imagined that this is some type of post-production effect, something which could be applied to almost any work. Perhaps Re-mastering.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, March 13, 2019 2:00 PM

IMNOTHERE


The 'Daytime Soap' effect sounds like a (bizarre) effect associated with switching to all-digital cameras, high-frame rate (or interpolation to high frame rate) and the reduction of motion blur.

There was a lot of fuss about this when The Hobbit first came out in high-frame-rate (48fps) format.

Traditionally, "daytime soaps" and other cheap programming were shot directly on video at a time when movies and high-quality drama were shot on film. There's a sort of CD vs. Vinyl thing here in that although video is technically better in many respects, many human beings prefer the look of film from an artistic point of view. In particular, because it is 50/60 fields (half-resolution frames) per second rather than film's 24/25 full frames per second, video captures smoother motion in a similar way to high-frame-rate film. It can also be somewhat sharper than film (especially in subdued lighting).

So what I think happens is that your brain subconsciously notices the high frame rate effect and sharpness and it just flicks a switch that says you're watching cheap shot-on-video footage despite the image being technically superior.

I noticed it like mad some years ago after I got a new TV with '100 Hz refresh' and a feature that synthetically interpolated the motion to 50fps - and yes, for a month or so until I got used to it, everything looked like a daytime soap.

Now, along with 4k, there's the prospect of true 50/60 or100/ 120 fps TV coming soon. https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/hfr-explained-high-frame-rate-is-com
ing-to-tvs-heres-what-you-need-to-know


So, my guess is that where you're seeing the effect, either they've shifted from using film to digital cameras for new material (so you're getting 60 fields-per-second and a sharper look) or they've remastered old shot-on-film shows with some sort of motion interpolation. If they were already using digital, perhaps (in response to the 'Hobbit effect') they've previously been using 'cinema' filters to soften the image and add motion blur but have stopped that due to the coming of 4k, HFR and HDR.

Brains are weird. Years ago, when 'flat(ter) screen' computer displays started to appear (I don't mean LCDs - I mean CRTs with 'flatter squarer tubes' or Trinitrons that were only curved in one direction instead of being flattened spheres) it took me a long time to stop seeing the nice new square image as a squidged-in-the-middle 'pincushion' shape because Mr Brain Cell was so used to compensating for the curvature of the old screen.





NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, March 22, 2019 12:05 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by IMNOTHERE:
The 'Daytime Soap' effect sounds like a (bizarre) effect associated with switching to all-digital cameras, high-frame rate (or interpolation to high frame rate) and the reduction of motion blur.

There was a lot of fuss about this when The Hobbit first came out in high-frame-rate (48fps) format.

Traditionally, "daytime soaps" and other cheap programming were shot directly on video at a time when movies and high-quality drama were shot on film. There's a sort of CD vs. Vinyl thing here in that although video is technically better in many respects, many human beings prefer the look of film from an artistic point of view. In particular, because it is 50/60 fields (half-resolution frames) per second rather than film's 24/25 full frames per second, video captures smoother motion in a similar way to high-frame-rate film. It can also be somewhat sharper than film (especially in subdued lighting).

So what I think happens is that your brain subconsciously notices the high frame rate effect and sharpness and it just flicks a switch that says you're watching cheap shot-on-video footage despite the image being technically superior.

I noticed it like mad some years ago after I got a new TV with '100 Hz refresh' and a feature that synthetically interpolated the motion to 50fps - and yes, for a month or so until I got used to it, everything looked like a daytime soap.

Now, along with 4k, there's the prospect of true 50/60 or100/ 120 fps TV coming soon. https://www.techradar.com/uk/news/hfr-explained-high-frame-rate-is-com
ing-to-tvs-heres-what-you-need-to-know


So, my guess is that where you're seeing the effect, either they've shifted from using film to digital cameras for new material (so you're getting 60 fields-per-second and a sharper look) or they've remastered old shot-on-film shows with some sort of motion interpolation. If they were already using digital, perhaps (in response to the 'Hobbit effect') they've previously been using 'cinema' filters to soften the image and add motion blur but have stopped that due to the coming of 4k, HFR and HDR.

Brains are weird. Years ago, when 'flat(ter) screen' computer displays started to appear (I don't mean LCDs - I mean CRTs with 'flatter squarer tubes' or Trinitrons that were only curved in one direction instead of being flattened spheres) it took me a long time to stop seeing the nice new square image as a squidged-in-the-middle 'pincushion' shape because Mr Brain Cell was so used to compensating for the curvature of the old screen.

As we know, Firefly was shot on actual film, while most shows are apparently shot on tape.

So do you think this effect is likely to be seen on Firefly?

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

YOUR OPTIONS

NEW POSTS TODAY

USERPOST DATE

OTHER TOPICS

DISCUSSIONS
Lens Effect on TV
Fri, March 22, 2019 00:05 - 4 posts
Batwoman
Sat, March 16, 2019 02:06 - 4 posts
The Passage
Wed, March 13, 2019 06:45 - 7 posts

Sun, March 10, 2019 06:59 - 32 posts
Humans on AMC
Thu, March 7, 2019 00:04 - 9 posts
Binge-worthy?
Fri, March 1, 2019 03:06 - 38 posts
Buck Rogers In The 25th Century
Fri, February 8, 2019 14:30 - 25 posts
H and I Channel.
Thu, February 7, 2019 00:37 - 3 posts
Travellers
Sun, February 3, 2019 02:01 - 6 posts
Continuum on Syfy
Tue, January 8, 2019 05:56 - 42 posts
Anyone else watching "The Last Ship" on TNT?
Mon, November 12, 2018 19:34 - 124 posts
Double post - nvm
Mon, November 12, 2018 12:30 - 8 posts

FFF.NET SOCIAL