BLUE SUN ROOM

Handy grammar guide

POSTED BY: PHOENIXROSE
UPDATED: Friday, August 17, 2007 08:08
SHORT URL:
VIEWED: 11249
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Wednesday, September 20, 2006 3:35 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Ok, I'd be happy to do that, but let me clarify a few things with you first, since I'm not a native to the UK and don't want to miss any nuance...
Could it be said to be similar in meaning to "rather"? Or is it more like "partly"? Or maybe even "mosty"? I don't want to get this wrong, so please let me know!


The only real failure in life is not to be true to the best one knows. - Gautama Siddharta

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Wednesday, September 20, 2006 4:00 AM

ELOISA


In the British English sense, "rather" can be used to mean both "extremely" and "slightly", with the latter closer to the dictionary definition and the latter as a sarcastic understatement, so yes, it's very similar to "rather" - unless, that is, "rather" is used in a different way in the US!

Thinking about it, there seem to be three levels of "quite" in use in UK English:

1) Slightly ("quite good" in dullish tone = just about acceptable)

2) Most of the way there, often in a surprising manner ("quite good" in excited tone = goodish, better than I expected)

and 3) Extremely ("quite marvellous" = wonderful; we wouldn't normally say "quite good" to mean wonderful). The stages between don't seem to be covered. What I don't know is how this will fit into what you can say about the silly word... Ah, for the good old days when words simply had contradictory meanings, such as "nice" once meaning "nasty".

I wonder if this means we need a UK/US translation dictionary in the BSR forum too.

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Wednesday, September 20, 2006 4:10 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


UK to US English dictionary might not be a bad idea! I'd be happy to contribute anything I know.

Sounds like it is close to the way we use "rather" (those of us who actually use rather, anyway) "Rather" is used both seriously and sarcastically. So now I think I understand a bit better. I'll see about putting that in there without it being too muddy.


The only real failure in life is not to be true to the best one knows. - Gautama Siddharta

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Wednesday, September 20, 2006 4:18 AM

ELOISA


Thank you, PR.

I'll come back on here and start a US-UK thingy after work this evening. By association it may even prod me into finishing the two incomplete Firefly shortfics I have on my hard drive.

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Wednesday, September 27, 2006 5:44 AM

MISSKITTEN


I just looked at the list and found which are my common mistakes... lol...

Grammar:
- Loose vs Lose - someone pointed out to me that I used "loose" when I should've used "lose" (but now I've been corrected)
- Noone - For a long time I wrote that, this has also been pointed out to me and I don't anymore.

Character names:
- I always write Zoë as Zoe (Bad me, but I can't help it, I always forget those two dots)
- I always believed Malcolm was written "Malcom", luckily I've pretty much always used "Mal", so there's been no problem there.

This guide's realy good, keep it up. There should really be more of these out. Too many people make so many of these mistakes and it's so easy to correct most of them.

*~*~*

"Joss, if you kill him now I'll stuff a compression coil up your ass sideways!"
~ Kaylee, "Serenity in 2000 words or less"

Kaylee's the perfect woman!

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Wednesday, September 27, 2006 10:54 AM

SAB39


Quote:

Originally posted by sahara:
I guess where I get confused is that I think of "The power to produce an outcome or achieve a result; influence:" for "effect" and "To have an influence on:" for "affect" to be almost indistinguishable.



Ok this is a little late, only just noticed this thread.

The difference between "effect" and "affect" is very simple in fact: one's a noun, one's a verb!

If it affects you, then it has an effect on you.

Dong ma? :)

Stuart.


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Friday, October 6, 2006 3:13 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by sab39:
The difference between "effect" and "affect" is very simple in fact: one's a noun, one's a verb!

If it affects you, then it has an effect on you.

Dong ma? :)


Thank you, kind sir!


"Languages are not just sets of symbols. They also often conform to a rough grammar, or system of rules, used to manipulate the symbols. While a set of symbols may be used for expression or communication, it is primitive and relatively unexpressive, because there are no clear or regular relationships between the symbols. A language that also has a grammar can manipulate its symbols to express clear and regular relationships between them."

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Friday, October 6, 2006 7:20 AM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:
Very welcome, Saraha! Always happy to help. Yes, they seem very similar. Those trip even my mom up at times.
Quote:

Originally posted by DesktopHippie:
Thanks, PhoenixRose! Your reely good to correct our grammer like this. Their are just to many silly mistakes being made these days. Its a real annoyance. Noone should be forced too read threw badly written posts. Hear's hopeing all our post's will be grammer perfect from now on!


Are you mocking me?



Me? Mock the beautiful, talented Phoenix Rose? Never! *looks very innocent*




More graphics available at www.desktophippie.com - yes, I've moved!

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Sunday, October 29, 2006 8:27 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Your innocent look does not fool me!

Oh yeah, and bump


"Languages are not just sets of symbols. They also often conform to a rough grammar, or system of rules, used to manipulate the symbols. While a set of symbols may be used for expression or communication, it is primitive and relatively unexpressive, because there are no clear or regular relationships between the symbols. A language that also has a grammar can manipulate its symbols to express clear and regular relationships between them."

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Sunday, October 29, 2006 9:25 AM

ASORTAFAIRYTALE


Thanks, this should clear up a few things around here....It kinda bothers me when people make mistakes like that, but then I also am kinda crazy too....

---------
Love keeps her in the air when she outta fall down, tells you she's hurting before she keels. Makes her a home.


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Sunday, October 29, 2006 9:42 AM

FARFLY


ireadsomewherethatallgrammarrulesweresuspendedwhileusingtheinternet?

Also, according to the following item, spelling errors are OK.

"Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. "



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Sunday, October 29, 2006 12:22 PM

MAZAEN


Linking words

A really useful tool is to build on sentences in your documents. One way you can build on sentences is to use a linking word.

eg Firefly has many characters. (I'll pick the linking word 'character')One of the characters is Wash. (I'll pick linking word Wash but will use a similar phrase to describe 'Wash'.) This blonde-haired, entertaining character pilots the ship, which is called Serenity. (I'll pick the linking word 'Wash')Wash is a funny guy who's married to Zoe, who is another crew member on the ship.

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Sunday, October 29, 2006 12:45 PM

MAZAEN


I was wondering if someone kmew about tense. I'm having trouble with tense. I've been told you should always use the same tense when you write a document. If you are going to use past tense, you use past tense throughout the document. If you are going to use present tense you use present tense throughout the doucment. I have written the paragraph below in all present tense, but it doesn't seem to make sense. Does anyone know why?

As Mal is standing, he looks outside the window of Serenity and into the blackness and the stars. He remembers looking up to the same stars when he has been in the war. On one night in the war, he has fought with Zoe against the alliance. When Zoe and Mal have been fighting, alliance planes have flown over Zoe and Mal's position. The planes have shot at Mal's troops, lasers placing colourful stripes over the landscape.


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Sunday, October 29, 2006 4:43 PM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by mazaen:
As Mal is standing, he looks outside the window of Serenity and into the blackness and the stars. He remembers looking up to the same stars when he has been in the war. On one night in the war, he has fought with Zoe against the alliance. When Zoe and Mal have been fighting, alliance planes have flown over Zoe and Mal's position. The planes have shot at Mal's troops, lasers placing colourful stripes over the landscape.


Brain hurty!
Ok, I'm not sure how to explain... Um, this paragraph involves memory, so it would go into the past tense. I'll see if I can write it properly...
"Mal is standing on the bridge of Serenity, looking out the window into the stars and blackness. He remembers looking up at the same stars when he was in the war. He was fighting against the Alliance; Zoe was there with him then. Mal remembers the planes flying over his position, shooting at his troops, the lasers painting colourful stripes over the landscape."
This describes, in the present tense, Mal remembering something from the past, which has to be in the past tense. I find it much easier to write (and read) stories all in past tense, personally.
Er, I hoped this helped. It's really hard to describe all those niddly little rules that can take years to absorb.

As for grammar rules not applying on the internet, that's just being lazy. It's written communication and is easier to understand if it's correct. Even l33t speak has its own grammar to it, in my experience. Everyone has the same frame of reference so everyone can understand what is being said. However, this is mostly a resource for fic writers. Grammar rules do apply when you're writing a story. If people want to use it for their day-to-day posting and communication, I will not mind at all, but I started this thread mostly for the fic writers (hence its location).


"Languages are not just sets of symbols. They also often conform to a rough grammar, or system of rules, used to manipulate the symbols. While a set of symbols may be used for expression or communication, it is primitive and relatively unexpressive, because there are no clear or regular relationships between the symbols. A language that also has a grammar can manipulate its symbols to express clear and regular relationships between them."

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Saturday, January 13, 2007 10:09 PM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


*sneaks in and bumps thread*

I've also added a few things to the top post.

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Monday, January 15, 2007 10:59 AM

ODDNESS2HER


This will be a great help to the aspiring writers in our midst. There are a couple of additions you could make to your "bore, boar" entry:

boor (n) a churlish, rude or unmannerly person (like Jayne!)

Boer (n) a South African of Dutch extraction



Fun with words!

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Tuesday, January 16, 2007 10:28 AM

NEWOLDBROWNCOAT


I got one. I hate to pick on Gwenfrewi, but she used this sentence in her Mal Love-Bot piece, which is otherwise excellent.

Quote:


Sneaking quietly into the cargo bay was easy since Simon had taken to sharing Kaylee’s bunk, but opening the box would be tricky, but she wasn’t a genius for nothing.



Shouldn't put 2 dependent clauses , both starting with " but", in the same sentence.
I got no problems with run-on sentences, sometimes they are the way to show pace or thought process.


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Wednesday, January 17, 2007 1:11 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by NewOldBrownCoat:
I got one. I hate to pick on Gwenfrewi, but she used this sentence in her Mal Love-Bot piece, which is otherwise excellent.
Quote:


Sneaking quietly into the cargo bay was easy since Simon had taken to sharing Kaylee’s bunk, but opening the box would be tricky, but she wasn’t a genius for nothing.


Shouldn't put 2 dependent clauses , both starting with " but", in the same sentence.


I always liked the word 'however' for these kinds of things. Definitely a snarled sentence no matter what, though.

[]

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Wednesday, January 17, 2007 2:10 AM

FLATTOP


Bump.
Just because I like the subject.
Grammar, spelling, diction, and penmanship are not just for fanfic.
Make your grandmother's day, send her a piece of snail-mail that you've written in your finest hand.

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Wednesday, January 24, 2007 7:29 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


I have added poor, pour, and pore to the first post. Came across an error with that one (several times) in a professional novel. Really unbelievable.

[]

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Sunday, February 18, 2007 11:31 PM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Okay, I see many people say "It peeked her interest" or something like that. This drives me crazy. I have added peek, peak, and pique to the top post.


Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.

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Monday, February 19, 2007 2:44 PM

SAVEWASH

Now I am learning about scary.


Quote:

Originally posted by sab39:

The difference between "effect" and "affect" is very simple in fact: one's a noun, one's a verb!

If it affects you, then it has an effect on you.

Dong ma? :)

Stuart.



Oh, I don't want to take something easy and make it difficult, but this isn't quite true.

Effect (v.t.) to produce as an effect; bring about; accomplish: to effect a change.

Granted, this isn't commonly used, but it's correct. Most of the time, you're safe using sab39's rule.


"We need to keep our heads so we can ... keep our heads."

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Monday, February 19, 2007 3:01 PM

YINYANG

You were busy trying to get yourself lit on fire. It happens.


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:
It’s = it is. As in "It’s a crying shame that Firefly was cancelled." Also used for it has, as in "It’s rained every day this week."
Its = possessive term. As in "The Alliance retracted its statements."



You've almost convinced my atheist self to become an agnostic. If you'd just had a thread with this in it, that would have been awesome.

PhoenixRose: conveniently available for hero worship.



Rules and voting: http://www.fireflyfans.net/thread.asp?b=2&t=22892

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Sunday, April 15, 2007 2:00 AM

RIVERDANCER




*bump*

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Sunday, April 22, 2007 1:55 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Hehehe, that's a great pic! I fixed it so it'll show up here:




Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.

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Sunday, May 13, 2007 10:46 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Feel like bumping this again. Would like to see a lot more people using 'a lot' rather than 'alot'(*twitch*)


Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.

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Sunday, May 13, 2007 10:55 AM

CONSTANCE


I would like to promote the proper spelling of my haircolour. I am blonde. My boyfriend however is blond. (and oh Im a girl.. just mentioning it so the point might come across clearer)

Thanks for the thread by the way. English is not my native language so this was helpful.

Constance

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Monday, May 14, 2007 4:26 AM

MAL4PREZ


OK, I was so fascinated by this that I looked it up on dictionary.com:

—Usage note The spelling blonde is still widely used for the noun that specifies a woman or girl with fair hair: The blonde with the baby in her arms is my anthropology professor. Some people object to this as an unnecessary distinction, preferring blond for all persons: My sister is thinking of becoming a blond for a while. As an adjective, the word is more usually spelled blond in reference to either sex (an energetic blond girl; two blond sons), although the form blonde is occasionally still used of a female: the blonde model and her escort. The spelling blond is almost always used for the adjective describing hair, complexion, etc.: His daughter has blond hair and hazel eyes.

So it sounds like there is a gender involved in the spelling (who knew? I didn't!) but it's not a hard and fast rule.


-----------------------------------------------
I'm the president. I don't need to listen.

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Thursday, June 7, 2007 1:41 AM

DARKFLY


thanks PhoenixRose your the best.

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Darkfly's Fan fiction, The Dark Chronicles OUT NOW

Want pics, vids, ringtones,ect releated to Serenity and Firefly
http://www.fireflyfans.net/thread.asp?b=2&t=26986

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Thursday, June 7, 2007 2:55 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by Darkfly:
thanks PhoenixRose your the best.


*sputters*


Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
A troll's hair is still pointy, even when it's wearing a hat.

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Monday, July 16, 2007 7:00 AM

MAL4PREZ


OK, I know this thread isn't about punctuation, but so many fics do quotations wrong that I think need a review of the basics is needed. I'm super bored today, so what the heck!

These may seem like small things, but they make a huge difference. Commas and periods indicate a different length of pause, and dialogue won't flow right if the punctuation is wrong. Most readers will sense it, even if they don't consciously recognize the error. So, make your readers more comfortable - get it right!


***Anytime a tag (ie. he said, she asked, they called out, George explained, etc...) is used with a quote, it is NOT a separate sentence. It gets a comma, not a period.

right: Wash queried, "Where are my dinosaurs?"
WRONG: Wash queried. "Where are my dinosaurs?"
right: "River has them," Simon said.
WRONG: "River has them." Simon said.

***BTW, the punctuation goes inside the quotation marks:

right: "We do business," Mal said.
WRONG: "We do business", Mal said.

***Because it's not a new sentence, don't capitalize the speaking action verb thingy, even after a question or exclamation:

right: "Are you gonna eat that?" asked Jayne.
WRONG: "Are you gonna eat that?" Asked Jayne.

right: "I'm a mad genius!" yelled River.
WRONG: "I'm a mad genius!" Yelled River.

***DO capitalize when it's a new sentence:

right: "Are you gonna eat that?" Jayne pointed at Kaylee's plate.
right: "I'm a mad genius!" River's face turned red as she yelled.

***When the tag's in the middle of the quote, use a comma only if the sentence in the quote ends:

right: "I told you," Mal said, "that I wanted pay up front. Now pay."
WRONG: "I told you," Mal said. "that I wanted pay up front. Now pay."

right: "I told you that I wanted pay up front," Mal said. "Now pay."
WRONG: "I told you that I wanted pay up front," Mal said, "Now pay."

Any more I missed?

-----------------------------------------------
hmm-burble-blah, blah-blah-blah, take a left

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Monday, July 16, 2007 3:59 PM

PLATONIST


I don't know if this is possible, when posting fic on this site, but I have my students write in their doc program (Works or Word).

They edit using Spell and Grammar Check, then copy and paste in our online writing program (Holt), then send and have it graded by a writing rubric that suggests improvement. I access their writing sample on-line and average their rubric grades.

They can reformat if necessary, but I think the program auto formats. Anyway, just an idea.

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Thursday, July 19, 2007 10:47 AM

2X2


This is an excellent thread!

And since I saw way up at the top a reply about character names, I would like to ask if anyone can confirm the proper spelling of the planet Londinum / Londinium

Acording to the RPG, the planet is actually Londinum - no extra 'i'. There is a map of the worlds in the RPG that shows this spelling.

This image also appears in the Serenity Visual Companion, however, the spelling in the write up has it as Londinium, with the second 'i'.

I haven't read the novelization yet, but I was wondering if there are any other instances out there to give us a clear indication of which is the correct spelling?

I've been using Londinum because I first saw it in the RPG, and have been thinking most people have been using Londinium in error. Now that I've found it in the Visual Companion as well, I'd rather be sure before I put my foot in it pointing it out to anyone.

Anyone?

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Thursday, July 19, 2007 11:21 AM

FREDGIBLET


Probably depends on if it's a American descendant or a descendant from anywhere else on the world...

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Thursday, July 19, 2007 12:23 PM

PLATONIST


I assumed "nium", from Latin, (they liked their vowels)

as in millennium or plutonium

I've seen the "num" also used... as in aluminum

good catch




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Thursday, July 19, 2007 2:38 PM

FIZZIX


Quote:

Originally posted by Platonist:
I assumed "nium", from Latin, (they liked their vowels)

as in millennium or plutonium

I've seen the "num" also used... as in aluminum

good catch






Aluminium is the British spelling, if memory serves. I prefer it. Lawlz. It's an American vs British thing. Americans distorted it.

/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\
May not be smart, and it may not please you, but you're definitely gonna see what I have to say.
Put this in your sig if you had a favorite show that may have been named Firefly and was canceled by FOX.

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Thursday, July 19, 2007 2:40 PM

FIZZIX


Quote:

Originally posted by mal4prez:
OK, I was so fascinated by this that I looked it up on dictionary.com:

—Usage note The spelling blonde is still widely used for the noun that specifies a woman or girl with fair hair: The blonde with the baby in her arms is my anthropology professor. Some people object to this as an unnecessary distinction, preferring blond for all persons: My sister is thinking of becoming a blond for a while. As an adjective, the word is more usually spelled blond in reference to either sex (an energetic blond girl; two blond sons), although the form blonde is occasionally still used of a female: the blonde model and her escort. The spelling blond is almost always used for the adjective describing hair, complexion, etc.: His daughter has blond hair and hazel eyes.

So it sounds like there is a gender involved in the spelling (who knew? I didn't!) but it's not a hard and fast rule.


-----------------------------------------------
I'm the president. I don't need to listen.



I use the rule , as it's the same sort of thing in French.(Which, oddly enough, in French, is not capitalized. But. This is an ENGLISH grammar thread. Heh.) This makes it a hard line, and I arbitrarily assign inanimate objects gender - typically based on characteristics. (May also come from French. Who said I had logic to my usage of blond/blonde?)

PR, you are of the awesome.

/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\/|\
May not be smart, and it may not please you, but you're definitely gonna see what I have to say.
Put this in your sig if you had a favorite show that may have been named Firefly and was canceled by FOX.

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Thursday, July 19, 2007 6:13 PM

PLATONIST


Actually it was "aluminum" first, as it is in the US today- Al on the table.

The British changed it to "aluminium" to align the spelling with the other element spellings, such as sodium.

Yes... a difference, but not a distortion.



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Friday, July 20, 2007 3:58 AM

MAL4PREZ


I know nothing about RPG, but here's my take:

I've always thought the word was pronounced with four syllables: lond-in-i-um. Without the i, it's lond-di-num, which sounds a lot like laudanum, which is an opiate. That seems weird to me.

Except... I just checked the Serenity the Pilot script and it's spelled without the i. Oh my stars - have I been wrong all this time?

How do you guys pronouce it?

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Friday, July 20, 2007 8:25 AM

PLATONIST


In regards to pronunciation, Londinum would be

"lon-di-num" 3 syllables as is "lau-da-num"

"Londinium" would be "lon-di-ni-um" 4 syllables


I like Londinium too. Londinum sounds like "umpa- lumpa'. Although Dahl is the crowning glory of Postmodern British Children's Literature. Don't get me started on Rowling and her blatant rip-off (Oh! sorry, I mean influence) of his brilliance!


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Monday, July 23, 2007 11:57 PM

2X2


From what I have discovered, the script was a TYPO... the proper spelling is 'Londinium', like the Roman city in Britain.

Joss himself has just confirmed this in a thread on Whedonesque about the new QmX Blue Sun posters, one of which is a Londinum poster, which he pointed out was spelled incorrectly. Now there will only be the original 300 poster sets being sold at Comic Con with the mis-spelling (which everyone predicts will make it an instant collector's item) and the rest will be corrected to read 'Londinium'.

So fear not, you had it right!
Oh, and you have the pronunciation correct too :oD

ETA: oh, here's the link to the Whedonesque post if anyone's interested: http://whedonesque.com/comments/13798

Quote:

Originally posted by mal4prez:
I know nothing about RPG, but here's my take:

I've always thought the word was pronounced with four syllables: lond-in-i-um. Without the i, it's lond-di-num, which sounds a lot like laudanum, which is an opiate. That seems weird to me.

Except... I just checked the Serenity the Pilot script and it's spelled without the i. Oh my stars - have I been wrong all this time?

How do you guys pronouce it?

-----------------------------------------------
hmm-burble-blah, blah-blah-blah, take a left


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Tuesday, July 24, 2007 12:21 AM

HOBBLEIT


Quote:

Originally posted by Platonist:
Actually it was "aluminum" first, as it is in the US today- Al on the table.

The British changed it to "aluminium" to align the spelling with the other element spellings, such as sodium.

Yes... a difference, but not a distortion.



but both spellings were put forward by the same man. The Europeans chose Aluminium and the Americans chose to use Aluminum.

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Tuesday, July 24, 2007 2:45 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


Quote:

Originally posted by hobbleit:
both spellings were put forward by the same man. The Europeans chose Aluminium and the Americans chose to use Aluminum.


So what's wrong with that?

Glad we got Londinium worked out. Never trust the RPG book


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Tuesday, July 24, 2007 3:17 AM

MAL4PREZ


Quote:

Originally posted by 2x2:
From what I have discovered, the script was a TYPO... the proper spelling is 'Londinium', like the Roman city in Britain.

Thanks 2x2! That's a relief - not the not being wrong part as much as that "Londinum" would just be annoying.

But speaking of punctuation (I know, no one was LOL!) has anyone else noticed how JK Rowling uses colons? I don't have the book here for a quote, but she'd use them like this:

Harry ran into the trees: The shadows were very dark.

Kind of like semi-colons, but with the second part capitalized. Is this an English (like England-English) thing? I don't recall seeing it before.

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Tuesday, July 24, 2007 5:14 AM

2X2


Quote:

Thanks 2x2! That's a relief - not the not being wrong part as much as that "Londinum" would just be annoying.


Happy to be of service ;o) (though, I kinda of liked Londinum, personally )

Quote:

Originally posted by mal4prez:

But speaking of punctuation (I know, no one was LOL!) has anyone else noticed how JK Rowling uses colons? I don't have the book here for a quote, but she'd use them like this:

Harry ran into the trees: The shadows were very dark.

Kind of like semi-colons, but with the second part capitalized. Is this an English (like England-English) thing? I don't recall seeing it before.



I noticed that too! I've never seen it before that I can recall though, and I also found it very curious.

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Thursday, July 26, 2007 8:45 AM

FIZZIX


Quote:

Originally posted by 2x2:
This is an excellent thread!

And since I saw way up at the top a reply about character names, I would like to ask if anyone can confirm the proper spelling of the planet Londinum / Londinium

Acording to the RPG, the planet is actually Londinum - no extra 'i'. There is a map of the worlds in the RPG that shows this spelling.

This image also appears in the Serenity Visual Companion, however, the spelling in the write up has it as Londinium, with the second 'i'.

I haven't read the novelization yet, but I was wondering if there are any other instances out there to give us a clear indication of which is the correct spelling?

I've been using Londinum because I first saw it in the RPG, and have been thinking most people have been using Londinium in error. Now that I've found it in the Visual Companion as well, I'd rather be sure before I put my foot in it pointing it out to anyone.

Anyone?



Ah, I recall that it's Londinium, Joss says so. (*can't remember the source, other than Joss.*)

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Monday, August 13, 2007 1:00 PM

ELOISA


Quote:

Originally posted by mal4prez:
But speaking of punctuation (I know, no one was LOL!) has anyone else noticed how JK Rowling uses colons? I don't have the book here for a quote, but she'd use them like this:

Harry ran into the trees: The shadows were very dark.

Kind of like semi-colons, but with the second part capitalized. Is this an English (like England-English) thing? I don't recall seeing it before.



It's not standard UK English. Probably an idiosyncrasy that went uncorrected by her editor - I know of one who always puts four dots in ellipsis instead of three...(.)

On the word-construction topic, I am convinced that "anymore" is an acceptable word. My flatmate is convinced that it has to be written "any more". Any advice?

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Tuesday, August 14, 2007 5:17 AM

MAL4PREZ


Quote:

Originally posted by Eloisa:
It's not standard UK English. Probably an idiosyncrasy that went uncorrected by her editor - I know of one who always puts four dots in ellipsis instead of three...(.)



Um... aren't you supposed to use four dots when it's ending a complete sentence or something? I'm never quite sure; I kind of just throw in 3 or 4 randomly.

But now I wonder if the Rowling's use of the colon is going to become standard, as new writers copy her. Interesting. If a writer is popular enough, they can create their own punctuation rules LOL!

Quote:

On the word-construction topic, I am convinced that "anymore" is an acceptable word. My flatmate is convinced that it has to be written "any more". Any advice?


I use "anymore". No idea of the correctness of that - except that both options come up on dictionary.com. There's no explanation of one versus the other though.

Of course, things may be different in England!

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Tuesday, August 14, 2007 10:25 AM

PHOENIXROSE

You think you know--what's to come, what you are. You haven't even begun.


I'm fairly sure anymore is a word, and anymore versus any more is kind of like everyday versus every day. For example: "You can't have any more caffeine." would be correct, whereas "You can't have anymore caffeine." would not be. "I can't take this anymore." would be a proper way to use 'anymore'. Anymore means 'any longer' or 'nowadays' which makes the rather odd-sounding "That's just how it is anymore." to be grammatically correct. 'Any more' means 'something more' 'in addition' 'a greater quantity' etc. See?

Amd I didn't notice any colon use like that in Deahtly Hallows. Can you give me a page number?


Human beings, who are almost unique in having the ability to learn from the experience of others, are also remarkable for their apparent disinclination to do so.
A troll's hair is still pointy, even when it's wearing a hat.

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Wednesday, August 15, 2007 6:10 AM

MAL4PREZ


Quote:

Originally posted by PhoenixRose:
Amd I didn't notice any colon use like that in Deahtly Hallows. Can you give me a page number?

I thought this would be a pain in the butt to find, but I opened the book randomly and got one! Page 265. For those who don't have the book on hand:

"STOP!" Harry thundered, and the powerful voice of Runcorn echoed through the Atrium: The wizards sealing the fireplaces froze.

Hmm... there's another on 269, then 272, then 278...

I don't mind it; it actually flows well. I've just never seen this usage before.

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