GENERAL DISCUSSIONS

What 'safe word' would you choose/use?

POSTED BY: SHINYFLAN
UPDATED: Friday, March 17, 2006 13:42
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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 11:05 AM

SHINYFLAN


Hi there-

First off, if this thread is in the wrong forum, then please reroute it. Thanks!

So I searched for "safe word" discussions, but I don't think that this topic has been discussed before. And it relates more to the movie "Serenity" than the Firefly series, but hope ya don't mind! And I apologize in advance if this has been discussed before.

Well, here goes: If you were chosen to provide the "safe word" to be used in "Serenity", instead of "Eta Kooram Nah Smech", or (Это курам на смех), what would you have submitted? Post your ideas!

Here are a few rules to keep it simple:

1. If you create the phrase with words you’ve made up (or you don't think exist) or if you use existing words but give them a new meaning, it has to somehow relate to Firefly or Serenity or Joss. And give a possible pronunciation for your creation, too. For example, if the safe word was “Y Tineres!”, I’d say that it could be pronounced like “Ee Tinairez!”. And how it relates is probably obvious...

2. If the safe word sounds like nonsense but it’s actually a phrase in another language, tell what language it is in and its connotation and/or literal meaning, and, if possible, also how to pronounce it. For example, if the safe word was “Eres un cacahuate!”, I’d tell ya that, iirc, it’s in Spanish and pretty much means “You’re a peanut!”.

3. The phrases can not be vulgar or profane to the average reasonable person who sees it.

I just thought it would be fun to see what you would come up with!

Here’s my made-up safe word (can you figure out how it relates?):



Thanks!

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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 11:17 AM

MATTCOZ


SERENITY NOW!

or maybe...

HOOCHIE MAMA!


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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 11:37 AM

AGIRLYMAN


"10 elephant exploding spray fart symphony"

In chinese of course.

AM I NOT MERCIFUL?!?!?!?

Tee Hee

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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 11:46 AM

KELLYOFLUTHIEN


*waits for the inevitable entry of Jadehand and BlackEyedGirl complete with handcuffs and floggers only to be disappointed that the chosen Safeword topic is only about Serenity....*

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I love my Captain



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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 11:48 AM

DINKY


Jungle Boogy!

"Th3re !s n0 spo0Ne." -The Matricks

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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 12:17 PM

CITIZEN


How about:
Fox is great



More insane ramblings by the people who brought you beeeer milkshakes!
You should never give powers to a leader you like that you’d hate to have given to a leader you fear

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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 12:17 PM

SHINYFLAN


Out of curiosity, I wanted to see if "Y tineres" (my example "made-up" safe word) showed up in a google search ( http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&lr=&safe=on&q=%22y+tineres%22 ). I didn't think there would be any hits in spanish, but there is an osha manual from an Oregon website or two that puts together the words "Pintura y tineres".

Does anyone know if "tineres" is an actual word in Spanish? If so, what does it mean? Does it have to do with paint somehow? Wild.


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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 12:24 PM

ZAKNRFAMA


Personally, I'd use 'go to sleep you insane, freakish little girl of ultimate doom'. Might be a bit too long, though. There's a good chance nobody else would say it in conversation and accidentally put her to sleep, I think.

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Wednesday, March 1, 2006 12:32 PM

INDIANABANZAI


"The toys are in the white box."

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Friday, March 3, 2006 2:32 PM

SHINYFLAN


You all have some pretty good ones! Has anyone figured out how the safe word below relates to Serenity/Firefly?




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Monday, March 6, 2006 8:22 AM

SHINYFLAN


About the safe word, , here's a hint:

The FI in it is from "FIrefly".

Does that help?


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Monday, March 6, 2006 8:28 AM

GIXXER


"Oi, you! Stop that!"

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Monday, March 6, 2006 8:40 AM

MILFORD


"Excuse me": I'd be well rested, that's for dang sure.

Remember, that but for one trifling exception, the entire universe is made up of others.- Oliver Wendall Holmes

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Monday, March 6, 2006 9:21 AM

JAMESTHEDARK


I'd probably use "Wüten Sie gegen die Nacht, Kind." Partly because it just flows off the tongue, and partly because its in a language not many in the 'Verse seem to speak. And it certainly has something to do with the psychotic behavior.

--------------
I ain't lookin' for help from on high. That's a damn long wait for a train don't come.

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Monday, March 6, 2006 10:38 AM

SHINYFLAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JamesTheDark:
I'd probably use "Wüten Sie gegen die Nacht, Kind." Partly because it just flows off the tongue, and partly because its in a language not many in the 'Verse seem to speak. And it certainly has something to do with the psychotic behavior.

--------------
I ain't lookin' for help from on high. That's a damn long wait for a train don't come.

Looks like your phrase has to do with "night" and "child", but so people don't have to use a machine translation or a German/English dictionary, what does it mean?

When I was younger, an effective phrase that could've been used for me is: "I'm telling mom!!!"


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Monday, March 6, 2006 12:37 PM

TENTHCREWMEMBER

Could you please just make it stranger? Stranger. Odder. Could be weirder. More bizarre. How about uncanny?


I'd say

"Soltanto i polli scortecciano alla luna la domenica."

Italian: Only chickens bark at the moon on Sunday.

but it would have the side effect of making every normal person in the room flatulate uncontrollably to cover up why the target "passed out".

That's creative sciences at it's best!



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TCM

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Monday, March 6, 2006 2:52 PM

JAMESTHEDARK


Quote:

Looks like your phrase has to do with "night" and "child", but so people don't have to use a machine translation or a German/English dictionary, what does it mean?

When I was younger, an effective phrase that could've been used for me is: "I'm telling mom!!!"



I'll tell it to you, if you explain what the hell yours is. I suck at anagrams, so cut me a break.

--------------
I ain't lookin' for help from on high. That's a damn long wait for a train don't come.

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Monday, March 6, 2006 3:36 PM

RMMC


Hmmm, safe word, eh? How about, "Ich kann ihr Gummischuhe nicht essen?"



And the it means (in German) "I can't eat your overshoes (rubber boots)."

Okay, its lame, but it's certainly not something I'd expect to hear in casual conversation, anyway.

I'll have a think and see if I can come up with better when I have a functual brain.


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Monday, March 6, 2006 4:26 PM

LAUGHINGMUSE


"Colorless green ideas sleep quickly."

In Cherokee. (And, unfortunately, I don't know how to translate that.)

---------------------------------
Mankind makes tools; we use them to augment our hands, arms and legs.
The computer augments the brain and this makes it very unpopular with totalitarians. - Charles J.C. Lyall

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Monday, March 6, 2006 5:32 PM

ANCIENTMARINER


Nobody slaps ya like Mama!

This isn't Gautamala!

Dance magic Dance!

"Son of a bitch."

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 6:33 AM

DONCOAT


"Arn tarn rassen frassen!"

It's based on Yosemite Sam's style of swearing, though I'm not sure if he ever used exactly that phrase. A friend of mine used to use it and it stuck with me, but I doubt whether there'll be very many classic WB cartoon fans in the 'verse.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
I don't disagree on any particular point.

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 6:48 AM

THEPISTONENGINE


Really nice. I was thinking German myself. I'm a fairly poor translater, so one question. Did you mean that as a command or switch the word order so it flows better?

Quote:

Originally posted by JamesTheDark:
I'd probably use "Wüten Sie gegen die Nacht, Kind." Partly because it just flows off the tongue, and partly because its in a language not many in the 'Verse seem to speak. And it certainly has something to do with the psychotic behavior.

--------------
I ain't lookin' for help from on high. That's a damn long wait for a train don't come.



_____________
Carry the Nuttin'

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 9:59 AM

ASARIAN


Mine would be:

"Purple elephants are flying."

(River, 'Dead or Alive').


--
"Mei-mei, everything I have is right here." -- Simon Tam

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 10:06 AM

ASARIAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JamesTheDark:

I'd probably use "Wüten Sie gegen die Nacht, Kind." Partly because it just flows off the tongue, and partly because its in a language not many in the 'Verse seem to speak. And it certainly has something to do with the psychotic behavior.




Fortunately, I speak German quite well. :) (I'm not German, btw).

It says: "Rage against the night, child." Very reminiscent of: "Rage, rage against the dying of the light."


--
"Mei-mei, everything I have is right here." -- Simon Tam

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 1:11 PM

THEPISTONENGINE


Aha, that makes better sense now. I tend to translate to literally. So when I saw the verb-subject, I immediately thought question, which didn't make sense. Then I though command, but included the "You" left off in English commands.

So I was thinking "You, rage against the night, kid," which somehow didn't work quite so well and hence my confusion.

Quote:

Originally posted by asarian:
Quote:

Originally posted by JamesTheDark:

I'd probably use "Wüten Sie gegen die Nacht, Kind." Partly because it just flows off the tongue, and partly because its in a language not many in the 'Verse seem to speak. And it certainly has something to do with the psychotic behavior.




Fortunately, I speak German quite well. :) (I'm not German, btw).

It says: "Rage against the night, child." Very reminiscent of: "Rage, rage against the dying of the light."


--
"Mei-mei, everything I have is right here." -- Simon Tam



_____________
Carry the Nuttin'

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 2:03 PM

ASARIAN


Quote:

Originally posted by ThePistonEngine:

Aha, that makes better sense now. I tend to translate to literally. So when I saw the verb-subject, I immediately thought question, which didn't make sense. Then I though command, but included the "You" left off in English commands.

So I was thinking "You, rage against the night, kid," which somehow didn't work quite so well and hence my confusion.




Hey ThePistonEngine, :)

Yeah, it's not a question. It's like this:

"Kommen Sie, bitte!"
Please, come!

If I wanted to do "You, rage against the night, kid," I'd probably not even use "Sie" altogether (polite form, like "vous" in French); but something like this:

"Du, wüte {dich} gegen die Nacht, Kind."


--
"Mei-mei, everything I have is right here." -- Simon Tam

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 2:49 PM

SHINYHAPPYKLIN


Quote:

Originally posted by LaughingMuse:
"Colorless green ideas sleep quickly."




Ah, the classic Noam Chomsky line....although isn't the last word peacefully? (or was it fitfully....hmmmm...gotta go back and read that chapter of the linguistics book, I guess).

In Cherokee that would be awesome!

"We gotta go to that crappy town where I'M a hero..."
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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 3:25 PM

LAUGHINGMUSE


Quote:

Originally posted by shinyhappyklin:
Quote:

Originally posted by LaughingMuse:
"Colorless green ideas sleep quickly."



Ah, the classic Noam Chomsky line....although isn't the last word peacefully? (or was it fitfully....hmmmm...gotta go back and read that chapter of the linguistics book, I guess).

In Cherokee that would be awesome!



I originally heard it as "quickly", though come to think of it, any adverb that wouldn't lexically fit with "sleep" would work.

Fitfully halfway makes sense. So does peacefully. The idea is: syntactically, the sentence parses. Semantically, the sentence parses. Lexically...the sentence falls on its colourless green backside. :D

---------------------------------
Mankind makes tools; we use them to augment our hands, arms and legs.
The computer augments the brain and this makes it very unpopular with totalitarians. - Charles J.C. Lyall

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 3:35 PM

RODWY


"The light is dark"

Probably cause it is something you wouldn't hear much.

---
Mal: Define Interesting
Wash: Oh god, Oh god, We're all gonna die?

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 4:25 PM

WASHBURNEFAN


"Firefly was never canceled." Might be a phrase you never hear.

Hahaha! Mine is an evil laugh... Now die!

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 4:36 PM

GELASSENHEIT


Just got done watching The day the earth stood still and my vote for a safe word would be:

"Klaatu beratta nichto"

Gelassenheit means Serenity

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 4:56 PM

THEPISTONENGINE


Ok, I've had my German lesson today, time for my English one.

As I understand it, syntactics would be how the words work together grammitically, semantics would be do the words work together to form a meaning, and lexically... ummm... do the words, for lack of a better word, simply fit?

So, syntactically, it works. The sentence is grammatical.
Semantically it works. If you broke down it's meaning, it'd mean "ideas which are colorless and green sleep and a high rate of speed."
But lexically, it doesn't make sense. It means something, but the meaning is nonsensical.

Do I have it right?

Quote:

Originally posted by LaughingMuse:
Quote:

Originally posted by shinyhappyklin:
Quote:

Originally posted by LaughingMuse:
"Colorless green ideas sleep quickly."



Ah, the classic Noam Chomsky line....although isn't the last word peacefully? (or was it fitfully....hmmmm...gotta go back and read that chapter of the linguistics book, I guess).

In Cherokee that would be awesome!



I originally heard it as "quickly", though come to think of it, any adverb that wouldn't lexically fit with "sleep" would work.

Fitfully halfway makes sense. So does peacefully. The idea is: syntactically, the sentence parses. Semantically, the sentence parses. Lexically...the sentence falls on its colourless green backside. :D

---------------------------------
Mankind makes tools; we use them to augment our hands, arms and legs.
The computer augments the brain and this makes it very unpopular with totalitarians. - Charles J.C. Lyall



_____________
Carry the Nuttin'

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 5:20 PM

PINBALLWIZARD


In my old Art History class, the first thing our professor said, in fact shouted, to the whole class, and my choice for a safeword, was "Bulbuss Breasts!" He said the phrase sounded very funny to him, and went on to say that part of understanding art was getting rid of old assumptions of right and wrong, proper and improper. We would see works of art on the projection screen, he said, that some might find offensive, disgusting, and even horrifying to a degree, and if we weren't willing to study said work we sould leave. We stayed, all because of bulbuss breats.

No, I am not insane, I am crazy. Thank you for asking.

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 5:32 PM

XENOPROBE


Furcifer Diem

This literally translates to "Scoundrel Days", which was the title of A-ha's second album waaaaaay back in the day. I was a fan - still am - and made the saying up in Latin class.

Since then, I have ofttimes used it just to be obscure... I think it holds up after all this time and the 'scoundrel' element is fitting for Firefly.





Ching-wah TSAO duh liou mahng. Shiny.

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Tuesday, March 7, 2006 6:01 PM

LAUGHINGMUSE


Quote:

Originally posted by ThePistonEngine:
Ok, I've had my German lesson today, time for my English one.

As I understand it, syntactics would be how the words work together grammitically, semantics would be do the words work together to form a meaning, and lexically... ummm... do the words, for lack of a better word, simply fit?

So, syntactically, it works. The sentence is grammatical.
Semantically it works. If you broke down it's meaning, it'd mean "ideas which are colorless and green sleep and a high rate of speed."
But lexically, it doesn't make sense. It means something, but the meaning is nonsensical.

Do I have it right?
____________
Carry the Nuttin'



Yes, that's it exactly.

Colorless doesn't fit with green - green is a color. A color, by definition, can't be without color.
Green doesn't fit with ideas - ideas are intangible, and can only have color in the poetic sense.
Ideas doesn't fit with sleep - sleep is state which is achieved by living things, not by inanimate objects or concepts (again, unless you get poetical)
...and so forth.

---------------------------------
Mankind makes tools; we use them to augment our hands, arms and legs.
The computer augments the brain and this makes it very unpopular with totalitarians. - Charles J.C. Lyall

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Wednesday, March 8, 2006 2:08 AM

SHINYHAPPYKLIN


Quote:

Originally posted by LaughingMuse:
Quote:

Originally posted by ThePistonEngine:
Ok, I've had my German lesson today, time for my English one.

As I understand it, syntactics would be how the words work together grammitically, semantics would be do the words work together to form a meaning, and lexically... ummm... do the words, for lack of a better word, simply fit?

So, syntactically, it works. The sentence is grammatical.
Semantically it works. If you broke down it's meaning, it'd mean "ideas which are colorless and green sleep and a high rate of speed."
But lexically, it doesn't make sense. It means something, but the meaning is nonsensical.

Do I have it right?
____________
Carry the Nuttin'



Yes, that's it exactly.

Colorless doesn't fit with green - green is a color. A color, by definition, can't be without color.
Green doesn't fit with ideas - ideas are intangible, and can only have color in the poetic sense.
Ideas doesn't fit with sleep - sleep is state which is achieved by living things, not by inanimate objects or concepts (again, unless you get poetical)
...and so forth.



Yep, that's it....the sentence was created by the famous scholar of linguistics, Noam Chomsky (who is also known as a political commentator these days), to show his concept of "universal grammar" -- that is, even children seem to know the proper structure of words (for example, without being taught, even children will always say "I caught the red balloon" instead of "caught I red the balloon"), even if the words themselves have no meaning together; the syntax is right, the meaning is nonsensical.

"We gotta go to that crappy town where I'M a hero..."
_______________________________
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Friday, March 10, 2006 3:52 AM

SHINYFLAN


Quote:

Originally posted by JamesTheDark:
Quote:

Looks like your phrase has to do with "night" and "child", but so people don't have to use a machine translation or a German/English dictionary, what does it mean?

When I was younger, an effective phrase that could've been used for me is: "I'm telling mom!!!"



I'll tell it to you, if you explain what the hell yours is. I suck at anagrams, so cut me a break.


Well, since ya asked - (I'm not good at trying to string people along when it doesn't even look like they're interested in puzzling it out...) - it's from FIrefly, TAm, CObb, SHepherd, REynolds, SErra, TAm, FRye, ALleyne, and HOban.

It's cool to learn some new phrases in other languages and also about the "colorless green ideas"...

Here's one safe word idea (or at least maybe a paraphrase from "Demolition Man") - "Enhance your calm!" It sorta relates, because when they were on Miranda, Jayne said that River was beginning to damage his calm.


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Friday, March 10, 2006 11:01 AM

ASARIAN


Quote:

Originally posted by xenoprobe:

Furcifer Diem

This literally translates to "Scoundrel Days",




Oh? Granted, it's been a while since I had Latin in school (it's been a while since I was in school, period; lol), but I see no plural here. "Diem" is the accusative form of "dies" : day. As in "Dies diem docet," {one} day teaches the {other} day.

Okay, did I just earn the smart-ass award of the day, or what? :)


--
"Mei-mei, everything I have is right here." -- Simon Tam

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Friday, March 17, 2006 1:42 PM

MOSS


Ok, who ordered the poo poo platter?

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