CINEMA

Rating system progression.

POSTED BY: JEWELSTAITEFAN
UPDATED: Wednesday, July 8, 2015 04:49
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Wednesday, July 1, 2015 8:40 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Saw that upcoming film The Walk is rated PG for some nudity plus other stuff.

Yes, I recall that Jacqueline Bisset's first full nude shot was in the G rated Airport, but that was some time ago.
No long ago any suggestion of nudity, or side boob resulted in R rating. Now nudity is PG.

Anybody heard of changes in criteria?
Opinions if this is better or worse? Will it help parents or not?

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Thursday, July 2, 2015 5:07 AM

SHINYGOODGUY


The times they are a'changing..................

I noticed there has been a slight shift in the what is acceptable of late, even some changes on TV where now it's okay to say dick, bitch, pussy, and ass. Yes, I was a bit surprised.


SGG


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:
Saw that upcoming film The Walk is rated PG for some nudity plus other stuff.

Yes, I recall that Jacqueline Bisset's first full nude shot was in the G rated Airplane, but that was some time ago.
No long ago any suggestion of nudity, or side boob resulted in R rating. Now nudity is PG.

Anybody heard of changes in criteria?
Opinions if this is better or worse? Will it help parents or not?


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Thursday, July 2, 2015 10:20 AM

ECGORDON

There's no place I can be since I found Serenity.


Everything started changing in the mid-80s when the PG-13 rating was created. Some things that had been reserved for R started showing up in PG-13 films, including mild profanity and brief nudity, and even some PG films were allowed a limited amount of "adult" material. For instance, one utterance of "fuck" was allowed in PG, but more than that qualified it for PG-13.

Just as with TV, the changing mores of the population has allowed more graphic content in films. If I was a parent with a child under the age of, let's say 10, I would feel the need to preview anything higher than a G rating before letting my child watch it. Then if there was certain content I felt was questionable I would decide either to not let them see it until they were older, or else watch it with them and prepare to discuss it. And I'm fairly liberal. I feel for any conservative, and especially religious, parents with small children. They might as well throw away their TVs, rip out their internet connection, and never go to the theater except for G rated movies.

EDIT: One other thing. What is now called NC-17 was originally X, then the MPAA dropped that when the porn industry appropriated it for their XXX rating. Both A Clockwork Orange and Midnight Cowboy were originally rated X, then later down-graded to R, although I'm not sure if that meant they were slightly edited or if the MPAA relaxed their standards at that time.



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Thursday, July 2, 2015 12:51 PM

MOOSE


Jacquiline Bissett was nude in Airplane? Didn't even know she was in it.

I think the context of a nude scene or swear word usage counts also.
For example, if the F-word is used as a simple expletive it can be used in a PG13, but if there is a sexual connotation to it, it has to be R. Or something like that.

There's a pretty good documentary, This Film Is Not Yet Rated, that deals with how messed up the MPAA ratings system is.

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Thursday, July 2, 2015 7:23 PM

ECGORDON

There's no place I can be since I found Serenity.


If I was on the rating board I'd be more inclined to be stricter on violence and less strict on sexual situations. But as Moose said, context is key.



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Thursday, July 2, 2015 7:30 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by Moose:
Jacquiline Bissett was nude in Airplane? Didn't even know she was in it.


Yep, she gave the BJ to Otto Pilot. Before that she was nude in Airport.

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Wednesday, July 8, 2015 4:39 AM

SHINYGOODGUY


Yes, EC, I remember when the whole NC-17 rating debate with Clockwork was actually being discussed. As I remember it, Kubrick and the studio felt it unfair to be classified with such a rating. But Kubrick pushed the limits with his then bold statement of a film, aimed almost entirely at violence, actually "ultra-violence and a bit of the old in/out" as my droogie Alex would say.

Kubrick pushed the envelope, the MPAA resisted with an NC-17 (mainly because of the emphasis on violence) although it is unclear if anything was left on the cutting room floor because of the rating. But, according to Wikipedia, Kubrick did produce a cut version to fit into the R rating. I would tend to think that with Kubrick that anything left on the cutting room floor was not the case, so there you have it. Later the original version was re-rated to R.

"Oh bliss! Bliss and heaven! Oh, it was gorgeousness and gorgeousity made flesh."

Viddy well, little brother, viddy well

What was once considered too violent for general public consumption, is now considered one of the classics of modern cinema history. The MPAA were the moral police back then and felt the need to protect us from the big bad Hollywood ner' do wells and miscreants. By today's standards, the violence in Clockwork is tame in comparison. But back in 1971 it was considered over the top, and only one visionary, aside from Kubrick, saw the beauty and raw elegance of Kubrick's work - Roger Ebert, who had the balls, and the pull, to speak his mind and call it for what it was - a work of art.

The violence in Clockwork was like a WWE ballet of motion and carefully choreographed footwork, a balancing act, if you will, that was rather poetic and fluid, coupled with the classical music in the background, belied the violent nature as presented. It was pure genius on the part of Kubrick to beset the contained mayhem with classical music as if to soften the blow of a chair being broken over the back, or someone being beaten by a chain. He was criticized for making it seem almost too beautiful, thereby glorifying violence. Perhaps that was a point he was trying to make, a statement within the film of violence in Hollywood films. Sex and violence -welcome back my friends to the show that never ends, we're so glad you could attend, come inside, come inside................


SGG


Quote:

Originally posted by ecgordon:
Everything started changing in the mid-80s when the PG-13 rating was created. Some things that had been reserved for R started showing up in PG-13 films, including mild profanity and brief nudity, and even some PG films were allowed a limited amount of "adult" material. For instance, one utterance of "fuck" was allowed in PG, but more than that qualified it for PG-13.

Just as with TV, the changing mores of the population has allowed more graphic content in films. If I was a parent with a child under the age of, let's say 10, I would feel the need to preview anything higher than a G rating before letting my child watch it. Then if there was certain content I felt was questionable I would decide either to not let them see it until they were older, or else watch it with them and prepare to discuss it. And I'm fairly liberal. I feel for any conservative, and especially religious, parents with small children. They might as well throw away their TVs, rip out their internet connection, and never go to the theater except for G rated movies.

EDIT: One other thing. What is now called NC-17 was originally X, then the MPAA dropped that when the porn industry appropriated it for their XXX rating. Both A Clockwork Orange and Midnight Cowboy were originally rated X, then later down-graded to R, although I'm not sure if that meant they were slightly edited or if the MPAA relaxed their standards at that time.




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Wednesday, July 8, 2015 4:46 AM

SHINYGOODGUY


It's always been this way since the Roaring 20s, the battle over Sex & Violence..........in the movies that is.


SGG

Quote:

Originally posted by Moose:
Jacquiline Bissett was nude in Airplane? Didn't even know she was in it.

I think the context of a nude scene or swear word usage counts also.
For example, if the F-word is used as a simple expletive it can be used in a PG13, but if there is a sexual connotation to it, it has to be R. Or something like that.

There's a pretty good documentary, This Film Is Not Yet Rated, that deals with how messed up the MPAA ratings system is.


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Wednesday, July 8, 2015 4:49 AM

SHINYGOODGUY


The MPAA must save us from the Devil, I mean sex. Violence, that's okay, it's safer to deal with and explain than our twisted obsession with sex.

Case in point - Cosby drugging all those women to get his jollies, who knew.


SGG


Quote:

Originally posted by ecgordon:
If I was on the rating board I'd be more inclined to be stricter on violence and less strict on sexual situations. But as Moose said, context is key.




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