REAL WORLD EVENT DISCUSSIONS

The Recipe Thread

POSTED BY: JEWELSTAITEFAN
UPDATED: Wednesday, December 4, 2019 14:06
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Saturday, April 6, 2019 2:09 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


I know some recipes have been posted, but they seem to get buried.

So here they could be found.

I should remember to post my spaghetti and macaroni & beef recipes.

Has anybody tried grilled peanut butter sandwiches?


What recipes do you want to share?

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 3:08 AM

BRENDA


I have a chicken dish that I do. It is a sort of take on a Spanish dish.

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 3:24 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


I have lots of recipes that the family loves. And they're a tough duo because they're both picky, each in their own way.

The best recipes for pork: I start with a "picnic roast" - on sale at @ $1.19/lb. Yes, it has a lot of bone and fat but even trimmed at $3/lb trimmed it meets my price point of $4/lb for trimmed boneless meat.

I cooked the roast in a covered dutch oven with a cup of water at 325 degrees for about 4 hours ... basically, until the meat is falling off the bone. Then I separate the meat from the fat and bone, (straining and reserving the liquid to make soup like hot and sour) and cool it. Once cooled, I cut the thicker chunks into roughly 3/4" thick slices, place them plus smaller chunks in a shallow roasting pan and coat with a marinade made of about 1/2 c Thai fish sauce, 1/2 c sugar, 2T water, 1T grated fresh ginger and 1T grated fresh garlic. And if you want more kick, add about 1 T of sliced green onion and a couple of shakes of chipotle powder. Let stand for one hour then broil until the marinade gets nicely carmelized 5-10 minutes depending on broiler power, how close you place the meat, and how dark you like your coating. I like to serve with a stir-fry of carrot, celery, red bell pepper, snow peas, shredded cabbage and/or zucchini and whatever vegies you'd like to add that seem appropriate (I've added leftover broccoli, leftover spinach, leftover peas, water chestnuts, bamboo shoots etc) plus shirataki noodles, plus a basic fish sauce/sugar/garlic/ginger/sesame oil sauce.

Or, make a bbq sauce of 1/2 c ketchup, about 1/2 c tomato sauce, 1 T worcestershire, some fressh chopped onion. For a spanish touch you can add about 1-2 t lemon zest, 1-3 t lemon juice, and 1/4 cup diced green onion. do the marinade and broiler thing. I like to serve this with a fresh green salad, or a nice cabbage/corn/bean/tomato/avocado salad.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 12:01 PM

CAPTAINCRUNCH

... stay crunchy...


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
I have lots of recipes that the family loves. And they're a tough duo because they're both picky, each in their own way.

The best recipes for pork: I start with a "picnic roast" - on sale at @ $1.19/lb. Yes, it has a lot of bone and fat but even trimmed at $3/lb trimmed it meets my price point of $4/lb for trimmed boneless meat.

I cooked the roast in a covered dutch oven with a cup of water at 325 degrees for about 4 hours ... basically, until the meat is falling off the bone. Then I separate the meat from the fat and bone, (straining and reserving the liquid to make soup like hot and sour) and cool it. Once cooled, I cut the thicker chunks into roughly 3/4" thick slices, place them plus smaller chunks in a shallow roasting pan and coat with a marinade made of about 1/2 c Thai fish sauce, 1/2 c sugar, 2T water, 1T grated fresh ginger and 1T grated fresh garlic. And if you want more kick, add about 1 T of sliced green onion and a couple of shakes of chipotle powder. Let stand for one hour then broil until the marinade gets nicely carmelized 5-10 minutes depending on broiler power, how close you place the meat, and how dark you like your coating. I like to serve with a stir-fry of carrot, celery, red bell pepper, snow peas, shredded cabbage and/or zucchini and whatever vegies you'd like to add that seem appropriate (I've added leftover broccoli, leftover spinach, leftover peas, water chestnuts, bamboo shoots etc) plus shirataki noodles, plus a basic fish sauce/sugar/garlic/ginger/sesame oil sauce.

Or, make a bbq sauce of 1/2 c ketchup, about 1/2 c tomato sauce, 1 T worcestershire, some fressh chopped onion. For a spanish touch you can add about 1-2 t lemon zest, 1-3 t lemon juice, and 1/4 cup diced green onion. do the marinade and broiler thing. I like to serve this with a fresh green salad, or a nice cabbage/corn/bean/tomato/avocado salad.




Sounds fabulous! Pretty cheap and healthy and not too hard to make - all good. Culturally, it's kind of all over the map, but recipes were made to be broken and reassembled. I wish more people took the time to find out how much pleasure making their own meals/exploring the world of cooking can be.

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 2:24 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


I'm definitely on the "not too hard" bandwagon!

There is another recipe that my family loves, but it's a pain-in-the-ass: vegetable lasagna, modified from America's Test Kitchen cookbook.

Vegie filling:
3 lb mixed zucchini and yello squash, sliced on a mandolin, cooked and drained. (I save the liquid for part of the recipe and the rest for soup or stew)
Plus 1 T fresh thyme
2 clove garlic, grated

Tomato filling:
14 oz crushed tomato
1/4 c chopped fresh basil
1 T olive oil
1/2 t oregano
2 large cloves garlic, grated
salt to taste

Cheese filling:
1 c cottage cheese
1 c cream
2 c grated Parmesan
2 cloves garlic, grated
1 T cornstarch

misc
lasagna noodles, uncooked
black sliced olives
fresh washed spinach leaves
shredded mozarella

I make a "with tomato" and "without tomato" version since I'm allergic to tomatoes. Also, I've left out the eggplant since I'm also allergic to eggplant (same family as tomato and potato, allergic to all)

Using two (glass) loaf pans ... in each pan

starting at the bottom, 1/3 of the tomato mix, or instead 1/3 c squash liquid
dry lasagna noodles
1/4 of the zucchini/squash mix
black olives (Kalamata or not, you choice) to taste
layer of spinach leaves
1/4 cheese mix
mozarella
dry lasagna noodles
1/3 tomato mix (or more squash liquid)
1/4 zucchini/squash mix
black olives, to taste
layer of spinach leaves
1/4 cheese mix
mozarella
dry lasagna noodles
1/3 tomato mix (or squash liquid)
mozarella

The reason for the squash liquid is to provide moisture to cook the lasagna noodles.

cover with foil, bake at 300 F for an hour. Let cool a bit before serving, or it will be runny. Family demands this once a week, but I have to set aside 3 hours in the kitchen!


-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 2:32 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


I guess I'll probably want to include an index, so this is a placeholder in case the OP runs out of space.

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 2:43 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
I'm definitely on the "not too hard" bandwagon!

There is another recipe that my family loves, but it's a pain-in-the-ass: vegetable lasagna, modified from America's Test Kitchen cookbook.

Vegie filling:
3 lb mixed zucchini and yello squash, sliced on a mandolin, cooked and drained. (I save the liquid for part of the recipe and the rest for soup or stew)
Plus 1 T fresh thyme
2 clove garlic, grated

Tomato filling:
14 oz crushed tomato
1/4 c chopped fresh basil
1 T olive oil
1/2 t oregano
2 large cloves garlic, grated
salt to taste

Cheese filling:
1 c cottage cheese
1 c cream
2 c grated Parmesan
2 cloves garlic, grated
1 T cornstarch

misc
lasagna noodles, uncooked
black sliced olives
fresh washed spinach leaves
shredded mozarella

I make a "with tomato" and "without tomato" version since I'm allergic to tomatoes. Also, I've left out the eggplant since I'm also allergic to eggplant (same family as tomato and potato, allergic to all)

Using two (glass) loaf pans ... in each pan

starting at the bottom, 1/3 of the tomato mix, or instead 1/3 c squash liquid
dry lasagna noodles
1/4 of the zucchini/squash mix
black olives (Kalamata or not, you choice) to taste
layer of spinach leaves
1/4 cheese mix
mozarella
dry lasagna noodles
1/3 tomato mix (or more squash liquid)
1/4 zucchini/squash mix
black olives, to taste
layer of spinach leaves
1/4 cheese mix
mozarella
dry lasagna noodles
1/3 tomato mix (or squash liquid)
mozarella

The reason for the squash liquid is to provide moisture to cook the lasagna noodles.

cover with foil, bake at 300 F for an hour. Let cool a bit before serving, or it will be runny. Family demands this once a week, but I have to set aside 3 hours in the kitchen!

I cannot consume cottage cheese, it makes me sick.
My mother learned to make a lasagna without cottage cheese, so I didn't understand why I would get sick when lasagna was served outside my house. Now she doesn't know how she did it, and my Evil brother does not allow anybody to view the cookbook.

I have heard of or seen lasagna recipes without cottage cheese. Do you know how these work, what the substitutions are, how the relationships work? Most of my cooking experiments or recipe modifications start with something I can eat, so I've never bothered to attempt lasagna.

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 3:54 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Is it cottage cheese specifically, or milk products with lactose, or any milk product? Ricotta is often used, but it also contains lactose.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 4:53 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


For years I cooked meals at home to take to work, but due to allergies/ intolerances/ salt-sensitivity I put a lot of restrictions on my recipes. And I put a lot of conditions on them as well. They had to be one-dish complete meals to be easy to take to work, and freeze well so I could make them in batches. Carb(~24g)- and calorie(max500cal)-limited and high protein(~24g), with a half-pound of veges per meal (since those would be my veges for the day). And since I hate, hate, hate vegetables they would have to be palatable to me.

Now, over the years I've shared many tastes with my coworkers because I like to get their opinions, and many of my recipes get good reviews.

One of my 'go to' ingredients is riced cauliflower instead of rice, which also serves as my vegetable, though I spread it out on a pan and toast it to dry it out so it doesn't get watery when you freeze it.


stir fry over cauliflower 'rice' 400 max (ETA: oh yeah! 12 svg)

4 lb gr beef OR gr pork (fat removed - see below) OR chx thigh in 2" pieces OR shrimp; 3 pkg (10oz) riced caulif, 2lb @ onion, bell pepper, 1/3C ginger peeled and thin sliced on mandolin; garlic to taste in thin slices on mandolin, pepper, soysauce to taste 5T oil (sometimes I'll use home-made chili oil)

toss riced caulif with 2T oil, spread on a large sheet and roast in the oven @375 with occasional stirring until lightly golden and reduced in volume to 1/3 of original

cook protein on a stovetop in 1T oil till lightly browned, drain the excess pork fat if using pork, and remove

cut the onion and bell peppers into slices, cook the onion, bell peppers, and ginger in 2T oil till veges are lightly softened, add garlic and cook till soft

add back protein, and add soysauce, and mix through

served over cauliflower 'rice'



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Saturday, April 6, 2019 4:58 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


Since I've retired I'm still cooking meals. The one cooking in the oven is Turkish bean soup with beef shank (and grilled beef meatballs for added protein). And the one next up is shrimp coconut curry over 'rice'.

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 10:05 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Is it cottage cheese specifically, or milk products with lactose, or any milk product? Ricotta is often used, but it also contains lactose.

I have no idea what ricotta is. If they talked about it on Master Chef, it was as if all viewers already knew.

I also don't know how how lactose is defined. I assumed it was an excuse to be anorexic by not consuming dairy, which may have morphed into rBGH reactivity.

As a child, couldn't have cheese or American Cheese, unless cooked like on pizza or spaghetti. I don't think sour cream was OK. Grilled cheese was borderline. No cheese on burgers. Milk, ice cream, butter were no problem. My favorite frosting was cream cheese frosting. Since the 90s I have sensitivity to BGH dairy products, far more than most folk, messing with my allergies, sinus, etc.
I also got sick from raw tomatoes, like sliced or diced tomatoes. Cooked like in pizza sauce or spaghetti sauce was OK. Tomato soup was borderline. Ketchup was OK.

After I left home, at some point I decided to wean myself into tomatoes and cheese. Now I can eat most cheeses, with cheese curds the biggest hurdle. Still can't do cottage cheese, and cream cheese frosting is too sweet for me. I can't do raw tomatoes unless buried in a sandwich, but tomato soups and heavily tomatoed chili, diced tomatoes in sauces or on pizza are OK now.
I like spreadable cheese now, like on crackers. If you can access Kaukauna Cheese, I highly recommend Garden Vegetable flavor. I pull cheese slices and American off sandwiches due to taste preference, but I stack cheese slices with summer sausage on crackers.


On another note, I like my cooked vegetables server in a butter Jacuzzi, like broccoli, califlaur, Brussel sprouts, green beans, corn, Squash, potatoes, etc. Uncooked broccoli and cauliflower are good with dip like dill. Celery and peanut butter, same for apples.

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 10:31 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


ricotta: Italian meaning re-cooked. Traditionally, after they make mozzarella they take the whey - the liquid part that's left over - and gently heat it. Another set of cheese curds form. They're very small and delicate and have to be gently lifted out by hand. This is ricotta. Its curd (lumps) is much smaller than cottage cheese, and since it's not aged or otherwise processed, it has a sweet fresh-milk flavor rather than the acid and salt bite of cottage cheese.

Lactose is a two-sugar molecule that is naturally produced by cows and found in cow milk - and is the largest percent sugar by weight in human breast milk! It's made of glucose and galactose bound together. As infants people have the enzyme to split the two sugars apart and can then absorb them separately, but a part of the population loses that enzyme later in life. 'Lactose intolerance' happens when un-split, un-absorbed lactose gets into the gut, and the bacteria go crazy on it!

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Saturday, April 6, 2019 11:48 PM

BRENDA


Roasted pork tenderloin

Pork tenderloin, salt and pepper. Add any vegetable. I usually include potatoes, carrots or brussel sprouts. Can also add garlic. Add bay leaf to the pan along with a can of V-8 juice and maybe half cup water. Put into a 300degree oven and roast until the pork is cooked.

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Sunday, April 7, 2019 4:06 AM

WISHIMAY

THIS machine kills fascists- Woody Guthrie


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:

After I left home, at some point I decided to wean myself into tomatoes and cheese. Now I can eat most cheeses, with cheese curds the biggest hurdle. Still can't do cottage cheese, and cream cheese frosting is too sweet for me.



Get some fresh mozzarella, don't cook it and eat it by itself. If it makes you sick you have a problem with lactose. If not, you may be sensitive to A-1 milk proteins which are thicker in cottage cheese, or casein (try vegetarian cheese). Or it may be a simple problem with salt or acid, which can indicate GERD.

Have you tried taking a Lactaid product with cottage cheese?

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Sunday, April 7, 2019 11:42 AM

CAPTAINCRUNCH

... stay crunchy...


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Roasted pork tenderloin

Pork tenderloin, salt and pepper. Add any vegetable. I usually include potatoes, carrots or brussel sprouts. Can also add garlic. Add bay leaf to the pan along with a can of V-8 juice and maybe half cup water. Put into a 300degree oven and roast until the pork is cooked.



Sounds tasty, Brenda! Pork Tenderloin is a highly underrated cut imho - cheap as chips per lb., and low in anything bad. It can be marinaded from Asian to Mexican and all things in between to give it a little more zip if you want. I love it grilled.

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Sunday, April 7, 2019 2:08 PM

BRENDA


Captain Crunch, I made that recipe up years ago. I like it.

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Saturday, April 13, 2019 12:43 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


I picked up some Lemon Pepper, to use for making baked chicken.

Holy Cow, I tasted nothing but salt. I don't use salt. Sure enough, the primary ingredient was salt. This is the only salt in my house.

Isn't this like false advertising?

Like Corned Beef. I like Beef, I like Corn, and no mention of salt. Totally misrepresentative.


I will say that I am cooking some chicken (sections) better than ever before.
Prior tricks were marinating in a bowl of orange juice, or in a zip lock bag of OJ, push out the air before sealing the bag. Plus covering all unskin-covered meat with sauce (BBQ, Teriyaki, etc), honey or molasses, which holds in the juices.

My new trick, using baking on a metal pan or cookie sheet (covered in aluminum foil), is baking at 425 for 30 minutes, and then dropping to 350 for 20-30 minutes, or even 45 minutes. I don't recall having such juicy and thoroughly cooked chicken from myself before.

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Thursday, April 18, 2019 2:04 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


This is not really a recipe, but a condiment post.


What are your favorite condiments for French Fries?
I think some people like vinegar.
The Fake Ketchup with HFCS is definitely not.
3. Real Ketchup, from tomatoes and vinegar, tastes great with thick Fries, Texas Fries or Steak Fries, and non-overcooked Fries.
2. Tartar sauce has long been a favorite dipping of mine for Fries.
1. But I've found my favorite condiment, shared by many, is Baked Beans Sauce. Like start with Van Camp's Pork & Beans, possibly add brown sugar, butter, vanilla, BBQ sauce, cinnamon, honey, etc. At restaurants, just getting the sauce off the top of the baked beans in a cup works well. Otherwise just dipping the Fry into the beans works, not carrying any beans out when withdrawing the Fry. Many people are surprised how good this tastes. With Fries, double dipping does not become a problem.

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Friday, April 19, 2019 11:32 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


My favorite recipe(s) for spaghetti sauce.

The basics of the "spice" or seasoning mix:
1 beef bouillon cube, crushed. I use granulated bouillon, 1 teaspoon.
1 1/2 teaspoons powdered sugar (or confectioners sugar, or 10x sugar)
1 teaspoon potatostarch (or substitute cornstarch)
1/4 teaspoon ground oregano
1/4 teaspoon ground thyme
1/4 teaspoon onion powder
1/8 teaspoon garlic powder
Pinch ground black pepper
Mix these ingredients in a small bowl.

Notes: reduction of the sugar or starch are possible, but I find that these help prevent caking, so that the seasoning mix sprinkles evenly into the sauce.

In medium saucepan, combine seasoning mix, desired tomatoes and water, bring to a boil, then simmer, stirring frequently.

Optional to add 1 tablespoon oil to the sauce.
Options for tomatoes/water mix:
A. 6oz tomato paste, with 1 1/2 cups water, simmer 5 minutes.
B. 15oz tomato puree, with 3/4 cup water, simmer 5 minutes.
C. 2 cups (16oz) crushed tomatoes, with 1/2 cup water, simmer 15 minutes.
D. 2 cups (16oz) carton pack tomatoes, without adding water, simmer 15 minutes.
For a spicier tomato sauce:
E. 15oz tomato sauce, 1/2 cup water, simmer 15 minutes.
For a chunky homestyle spaghetti sauce:
F. 14.5oz whole tomatoes, cut up and undrained, with 1/3 cup water, simmer 15 minutes.
G. 1 1/4 pounds fresh ripe tomatoes, pureed, without water, simmer 40 minutes.


Also, sweet vermouth may be used to replace some or all of the water.

This makes about 1 pint sauce. Some folk feel this is 4 servings, but I like lots of sauce in my spaghetti.

For meatsauce, add 1/2 pound ground beef.
I also like using chicken bouillon instead of beef.
I sometimes add vanilla extract.


I like making thick and zesty sauces for my spaghetti, pizza, other tomato sauces.
I take a 15oz can of diced or petite diced tomatoes, in a small saucepan, bring to a boil for 2 minutes, add to the sauce. This can replace about 1 cup of water.

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Friday, April 19, 2019 11:35 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


aaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyeeeeeeee

.too.much.sodium.

But, to each his own! :)

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Saturday, April 20, 2019 12:18 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by rue:
aaaaaaayyyyyyyyyyyyyyeeeeeeee

.too.much.sodium.

But, to each his own! :)

That's weird. I don't like salt, I don't add salt, I don't have salt in my house, often I feel some food tastes nothing but salt. I never taste salt in my sauce. This is also the only reason I have bouillon.

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 12:33 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


If I'm not mistaken, isn't the first ingredient in bouillon salt?

Well, in any case ... this is a takeoff on BRENDA's recipe for pork tenderloin (which btw I've never figured out how to cook properly) but I use chicken instead. I like to do this when the weather is cooler.


Chicken, cut up
As many potatoes as you like, cut into bite-sized pieces
Purple sweet potato ("yam") cut into .."

Onions, quartered (onion cooks up very quickly)
A bag of frozen brussels sprouts
As many cauliflower florets as you want, broken into bite-sized ...
Six strips of bacon (optional)

Oil (canola, olive, grapeseed, or "vegetable")
Salt
Pepper
Paprika
Thyme

Coat chicken with oil, sprinkle with seasonings
Coat potato and "yam" with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper
Place legs, thighs, wings, potatoes, and yam in large roasting pan in oven at 325F for 25 minutes

Coat remaining vegetables with oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper
Add remaining vegetables and chicken breast to roasting pan, cover with bacon (optional) and continue roasting at 400F until done, about another 20-30 minutes

It's crazy simple but family really likes it, esp the roast veggies.



-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 2:17 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


If I could find bouillon without salt, I would use it. I never make broth with bouillon because broth tastes salty to me.

Apparently the key portion of bouillon is autolyzed yeast. Is there another way to readily obtain this?

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 3:03 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Autolyzed yeast

Quote:

The interaction between salt and live yeast creates a chemical process called autolysis. Autolysis is essentially the self-destruction or self-digestion of an organism by its own enzymes. Salt does not "kill" yeast as much as it causes the live yeast's digestive enzymes to eat themselves. The result is an inactive yeast with a different concentration of proteins. This new food product can be further processed to create a yeast extract.

Many people may not recognize autolyzed yeast as an ingredient in many of their favorite processed foods, but they might recognize an ingredient derived from it: MSG, or monosodium glutamate. Both are used as flavor enhancers in processed foods. Autolyzed yeast extract is also used by itself in processed food spreads such as Vegemite. Because of its high protein content, this yeast generally has a hearty flavor similar to beef, which is why it is often used to give processed foods a meaty or savory undertone.



https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-autolyzed-yeast.htm

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 3:53 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Autolyzed yeast
Quote:

The interaction between salt and live yeast creates a chemical process called autolysis. Autolysis is essentially the self-destruction or self-digestion of an organism by its own enzymes. Salt does not "kill" yeast as much as it causes the live yeast's digestive enzymes to eat themselves. The result is an inactive yeast with a different concentration of proteins. This new food product can be further processed to create a yeast extract.

Many people may not recognize autolyzed yeast as an ingredient in many of their favorite processed foods, but they might recognize an ingredient derived from it: MSG, or monosodium glutamate. Both are used as flavor enhancers in processed foods. Autolyzed yeast extract is also used by itself in processed food spreads such as Vegemite. Because of its high protein content, this yeast generally has a hearty flavor similar to beef, which is why it is often used to give processed foods a meaty or savory undertone.


https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-autolyzed-yeast.htm

Do you think that means autolyzed yeast contains MSG, or is it a better form of MSG?

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 2:27 PM

BRENDA


Just some basic lamb chops for supper tonight.

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 2:41 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Contains MSG, which is one of the compounds produced when yeast digests itself.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 4:06 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Just some basic lamb chops for supper tonight.

I used to like lamb, but it's crazy expensive here. But after I lost my sense of smell/taste, and since the rest of the family doesn't like it, there's no point in buying it.

Still, I can understand it being a real treat. Our mom used to make bbq'd lamb shanks, and as I recall the recipe was:

Braise shanks until meat is fork-tender, remove from bone.

In a separate pot mix 1/2c ketchup, 1/2 tomato sauce, 1/4 c sugar, 2T worcestershire, chopped small onion, chopped green pepper, 1 T lemon juice and 2 t lemon zest, 1 bay leaf. Cook until vegetables are done. Remove bay leaf and add lamb and stir. Simmer until flavors are blended, serve over rice. When I could smell/taste, I thought it was yummy, and I use this bbq sauce variation on pork for the family.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 4:55 PM

BRENDA


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Quote:

Originally posted by Brenda:
Just some basic lamb chops for supper tonight.

I used to like lamb, but it's crazy expensive here. But after I lost my sense of smell/taste, and since the rest of the family doesn't like it, there's no point in buying it.

Still, I can understand it being a real treat. Our mom used to make bbq'd lamb shanks, and as I recall the recipe was:

Braise shanks until meat is fork-tender, remove from bone.

In a separate pot mix 1/2c ketchup, 1/2 tomato sauce, 1/4 c sugar, 2T worcestershire, chopped small onion, chopped green pepper, 1 T lemon juice and 2 t lemon zest, 1 bay leaf. Cook until vegetables are done. Remove bay leaf and add lamb and stir. Simmer until flavors are blended, serve over rice. When I could smell/taste, I thought it was yummy, and I use this bbq sauce variation on pork for the family.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .



I only buy the chops as a treat. Around my birthday or like now Easter or New Year's.

Discovered a taste for them years ago. And depending on when you buy them yes they can be a little expensive.

I've seen lamb shanks in the store but since right now I can't get a pot big enough to braise them, can't buy them. I would like to try them.

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 5:12 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


I think I can eat lamb again, after many decades. Someone made lentil soup with lamb, but the meat was really greasy and the 'lamb' must have been more like mutton - really strong and gamy. I pooped my guts out for 3 days. Maybe this doesn't belong in the recipe thread ... oh what the heck. It was the result of a failed recipe.

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 5:25 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


Anyway - I just completed crafting a recipe for hot and sour soup, since I have a lot of clear, strained and de-fatted, pork broth in the freezer that I saved up from roasting some pork shoulders.

As I've mentioned before I hate hate hate vegetables, so I try and find ways to stuff about a half a pound (raw weight) into each serving (those will be my vegetables for the day). But in this recipe I had to count the firm tofu as vegetable as well. Despite the tofu, there are TONS of other veges in the soup, which makes it not at all traditional. They include mushrooms, bamboo shoots, water chestnuts, snow peas, bean sprouts, dried lily bud (if I can find them) and scallion, and also to boost the protein, a small pork meatball in each bowl.

So now I'm on the hunt to find the ingredients!

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Sunday, April 21, 2019 7:46 PM

RUE

I have a vote and I'm not afraid to use it!


"Contains MSG, which is one of the compounds produced when yeast digests itself."

MSG is mono-sodium glutamate. Glutamate is a naturally occurring amino acid. In its *free* form not bound inside a protein, it creates an umami, savory. meaty flavor.

A LOT of foods in the yeast / mushroom family have naturally occurring free glutamate. (A fungus is a type of mold grows long threads called hyphae, a yeast is a type of mold that stays a round cell.) Soy sauce (fermented with yeast), fish sauce (fermented with yeast) and miso (fermented with yeast) have glutamate, as does aged Parmesan and for example Roquefort (fermented with fungus). The umami Parmesan flavor is why Italian cooks will put Parmesan rind in their soups. Mushrooms also have glutamate!

Another source of free glutamate is hydrolyzed anything, where it's been freed from the protein so you can taste it.

A surprise! source of glutamate is anything 'tomato'.

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Tuesday, April 23, 2019 10:13 PM

BRENDA


bump

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Wednesday, April 24, 2019 12:32 AM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by rue:
"Contains MSG, which is one of the compounds produced when yeast digests itself."

MSG is mono-sodium glutamate. Glutamate is a naturally occurring amino acid. In its *free* form not bound inside a protein, it creates an umami, savory. meaty flavor.

A LOT of foods in the yeast / mushroom family have naturally occurring free glutamate. (A fungus is a type of mold grows long threads called hyphae, a yeast is a type of mold that stays a round cell.) Soy sauce (fermented with yeast), fish sauce (fermented with yeast) and miso (fermented with yeast) have glutamate, as does aged Parmesan and for example Roquefort (fermented with fungus). The umami Parmesan flavor is why Italian cooks will put Parmesan rind in their soups. Mushrooms also have glutamate!

Another source of free glutamate is hydrolyzed anything, where it's been freed from the protein so you can taste it.

A surprise! source of glutamate is anything 'tomato'.

Is MSG bad always, or only in large quantities? I normally avoid it.


What is mutton?

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Wednesday, April 24, 2019 1:27 AM

WISHIMAY

THIS machine kills fascists- Woody Guthrie


Quote:

Originally posted by JEWELSTAITEFAN:



What is mutton?



Does it know how to google, precious?
It's on the internets, Smeagol, it should...

Then why it ask dumb questions, precious?
Because "mutton" has 6 letters Smeagol and it only has 4 fingers...total.

But it has the five teeth, precious.
Smeagol can counts to nine. (edits comment about JSF's mother and farm animals and a ring)

Come along, Smeagol, there are other dumb yet easily queried questions on the internets that need mocking...


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Wednesday, May 29, 2019 5:46 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Not an actual recipe, but on the subject of flavors...

Root Beer. The best way that I have found to set the standard.

Can of A&W Root Beer (Happy 100th, btw). Not bottle or other container. Put in fridge for a couple days.
Frosty mug. Buy one from A&W, or similar other style. For frosting, after cleaning, wet it just before placing in freezer. If it still has a few drops about to drop off, that is fine. Leave in freezer for 2 days.
Remove both, pour Root Beer into Frosty mug. Like pouring beer, tilt the glass and straighten up as it fills up. Half inch of foam head works well.

For me, this is the standard from which to compare all other root beer tastings.

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Wednesday, May 29, 2019 5:59 PM

6IXSTRINGJACK

[/i]


Dude... you live in Wisconsin.

Sprecher's all the way.

Do Right, Be Right. :)

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Thursday, May 30, 2019 12:24 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


We had beef and bean burritos ... another labor of love because

1) hubby hates sour cream but loves spicy food, should avoid too many carbs
2) daughter is sensitive to beans and should also avoid onions and garlic and wheat (FODMAPS foods), loves black olives but hates spicy-hot stuff
3) I'm supposed to avoid beef and tomatoes and wheat, but OK with beans and chiles

So we each get something different-

Hubby gets locarb tortillas with spicy meat mixture, cheddar cheese and beans with red salsa and black olives on top
Dear daughter gets corn tortillas with non-spicy beef, very little beans, black olives and mozzarella inside and sour cream on top
I get corn tortillas, beans, no olives and no red salsa with cheddar on top

Sometimes I feel like a short-order cook. But at least everyone walks away from the table happy!


-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Saturday, July 13, 2019 4:17 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


So, this isn't a recipe per, just what I call bachelor cooking.

Take equal weight brown onions and waxy potatoes (boilers, not bakers) peel and chop the onions in roughly 1/2" and wash and cut the potatoes in 1" pieces, put in a pan with some oil and if you want, add some butter too, cover and cook VERY low till the potatoes are done. The moisture from the onions and potatoes will leak out and they'll steam tender without burning if the heat is low enough. When the potatoes are done, scoop everything into a storage bowl, cover and put in the frig for later.

For a VERY quick meal you can take some of this mix and put it in a pan, crack an egg or two on top, cover with some cheese, cover the pot and cook low till the eggs are done and the cheese is melted - a meal in roughly 5 minutes. And or you can put tomato sauce and or salsa on top and or cut up 'fully cooked' sausage / chorizo.

You can also quickly turn them into a faux potato salad heated with a bit of vinegar, or mixed cold with mayo ... and or with bacon bits added and or hardboiled egg.

If you want more variety, you can also add some washed and cut up greens of your choice ... dandelion, chard, kale, even cabbage, and so on ... to the mix and cook covered and low till the greens are done - another meal in roughly 5 minutes.

Or with more prep you can go a standard European route and cook come carrot and or celery and or chicken / beef / pork with thyme and or rosemary and or parsley and or sage and mix with the potato onion mix. But if you have some pre-cooked chicken / beef / pork you can just cut them up, add them in, and heat, perhaps with tomato sauce and or salsa on top and or cheese.

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Monday, July 15, 2019 12:55 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Best beef burgers
(Yep, not supposed to eat beef, but I still do from time to time)

2.5 lbs of ground sirloin (10% fat; I buy mine on sale @ $3.99/lb, which is my price point for meat)
1.5 cups panko bread crumbs
1 10-oz can Las Palmas Green Chile Enchilada Sauce
1.5 tsp Amazing Taste Garlic and Onion Medley (dried seasoning mix)
Small can sliced black olives (not Kalamata, but you can use them if you enjoy the taste)
IF YOU LIKE IT HOT
1 t or more chipotle chili powder

IF YOU LIKE IT HOTTER
Sprinkle more chipotle chili powder on the patties

MIX WELL. MAKES EIGHT PATTIES.

As you mix the meat, crumbs and sauce you will get a more uniform feel to the meat, and it will stick together better into patties. Don't worry about over-working the meat and making it tough, the crumbs will keep the meat tender and the sauce will keep it moist. I always cook these in a pan, not sure whether they would stick together enough to put on a grill.

I like to serve this with cole slaw, and corn on the cob. It's a quick recipe for summer that doesn't involve a lot of cooking!

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Monday, July 15, 2019 5:59 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Best beef burgers
(Yep, not supposed to eat beef, but I still do from time to time)

2.5 lbs of ground sirloin (10% fat; I buy mine on sale @ $3.99/lb, which is my price point for meat)
1.5 cups panko bread crumbs
1 10-oz can Las Palmas Green Chile Enchilada Sauce
1.5 tsp Amazing Taste Garlic and Onion Medley (dried seasoning mix)
Small can sliced black olives (not Kalamata, but you can use them if you enjoy the taste)
IF YOU LIKE IT HOT
1 t or more chipotle chili powder

IF YOU LIKE IT HOTTER
Sprinkle more chipotle chili powder on the patties

MIX WELL. MAKES EIGHT PATTIES.

As you mix the meat, crumbs and sauce you will get a more uniform feel to the meat, and it will stick together better into patties. Don't worry about over-working the meat and making it tough, the crumbs will keep the meat tender and the sauce will keep it moist. I always cook these in a pan, not sure whether they would stick together enough to put on a grill.

I like to serve this with cole slaw, and corn on the cob. It's a quick recipe for summer that doesn't involve a lot of cooking!

I can't conjure those wouldn't work well on a Geaorge Foreman Grill.
My local convenience store is Kwik Trip, normal prices are 2.99 for 20-30% fat, 3.99 for 10% fat, and about 4.99 for 5% or 7% fat. I normally use the low-fat, but I've learned to convert the sizes and buns for when the 20-30% is On Sale for 1.99.

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Monday, July 15, 2019 7:32 PM

BRENDA


Precooked chicken, take it off the bone and leave the skin on it. Put into a frying pan and add any partially cooked vegetable. Toss around in the heat then eat.

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Thursday, July 18, 2019 8:09 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Now, here is another burger recipe that the family loves: turkey burgers!

2 lb ground turkey
1/2-3/4 c panko bread crumbs
1 t dried oregano
1/2 t garlic powder
1/3 c ketchup
1/2 c grated parmesan
1/2 t salt
1 egg

Mix well, makes eight patties. On a bun with lettuce, tomato, mayo and (if you really want to go all-out) bacon

*****
Not just recipes, I like to make meals

Tomorrow its going to be falafels, with panfried Greek-marinated flap meat, and cucumber, tomato, parsley, celery, olive, and red pepper salad with olive oil/red wine vinegar/garlic/oregan/thyme dressing.



-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

"The messy American environment, where most people don't agree, is perfect for people like me. I CAN DO AS I PLEASE." - SECOND

America is an oligarchy http://www.fireflyfans.net/mthread.aspx?tid=57876 .

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Wednesday, September 25, 2019 6:16 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


A while ago I discovered pigs feet, which make the most unctuous, delectable broth I've ever had. So I made a white bean soup with pigs feet broth, white beans cooked in the broth till very soft, crisped bacon, and oven-roasted pork meatballs which gives them a grilled taste, and of course onion and a bit of tomato for color and umami, and bay leaf for aromatics. And I froze a batch in portions.

Today I pulled some out of the freezer and got reminded of how good it truly is.

But I wanted to stretch it further so I added fine chopped Tuscan kale, vinegar, and fresh ground black pepper, and re-cooked it till the kale was meltingly tender.

Oh is THAT so good too!

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Saturday, October 26, 2019 4:30 AM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Discovered a recipe for hot and sour soup that the family loves, and it's super-simple:

6 c broth (I use pork broth from roasting)
1 8oz box mushrooms, any kind, cleaned, stems removed, caps slice thin
1 t ginger powder
1/4 c soy sauce or tamari
1/4 c rice wine vinegar
1 can bamboo shoots
(handful spinach leaves, optional)
1/4 c corn starch
2 beaten eggs
1 teaspoon sesame oil
8 oz tofu cubed
chopped scallions or green onion, green portion

put first six ingredients in a pot, bring to a simmer (add spinach if desired)
dissolve corn starch in 1/4 c cold water, add to soup and simmer until thickened
drizzle in beaten egg while stirring soup to make egg drop noodles
add sesame oil and sriracha or other hot sauce to taste
divide tofu between three bowls
ladle soup over, garnish with green onions or scallions


I keep waiting for family to get tired of this but they keep asking for more!



-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

You idiots have been oppressing the entire sexual spectrum as long as you have existed. I can't wait for the day your kind is dead - WISHIMAY

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Saturday, October 26, 2019 9:01 PM

1KIKI

Goodbye, kind world (George Monbiot) - In common with all those generations which have contemplated catastrophe, we appear to be incapable of understanding what confronts us.


That sounds really tasty Signy! Thanks for sharing it.

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Saturday, November 9, 2019 11:36 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Here is an enitrely made-up recipe that family is OK with for quiche. (Hubby hates quiches except for this one.)

Line the bottom (JUST the bottom) of a loaf pan with commercial or homemade pie crust. Bake at 400F until golden, about 15 minutes; remove from oven

Place into food processor or blender
about 6" turkey sausage, sliced
1 carton cottage cheese (I rinse and drain it to reduce salty/sour taste)
6 oz shredded cheese (I use "Italian blend" but you can use whatever you like)
4 eggs
1/4 c flour
1/2 c milk
youcan add cooked broccoli, chopped parsley, cooked onions or fresh green onions or mushrooms

blenderize it to desired texture (You can make it smooth and uniform or leave visible peices of sausage and vegetables ... it's up to you.

Pour into the loaf pan and bake at 325 until inserted knife comes out cleanly, about 1 1/4 hour.

*****

I serve this with a salad on the side and fruit/jello.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

You idiots have been oppressing the entire sexual spectrum as long as you have existed. I can't wait for the day your kind is dead - WISHIMAY

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Sunday, November 10, 2019 4:11 PM

JEWELSTAITEFAN


Quote:

Originally posted by SIGNYM:
Here is an enitrely made-up recipe that family is OK with for quiche. (Hubby hates quiches except for this one.)

Line the bottom (JUST the bottom) of a loaf pan with commercial or homemade pie crust. Bake at 400F until golden, about 15 minutes; remove from oven

Place into food processor or blender
about 6" turkey sausage, sliced
1 carton cottage cheese (I rinse and drain it to reduce salty/sour taste)
6 oz shredded cheese (I use "Italian blend" but you can use whatever you like)
4 eggs
1/4 c flour
1/2 c milk
youcan add cooked broccoli, chopped parsley, cooked onions or fresh green onions or mushrooms

blenderize it to desired texture (You can make it smooth and uniform or leave visible peices of sausage and vegetables ... it's up to you.

Pour into the loaf pan and bake at 325 until inserted knife comes out cleanly, about 1 1/4 hour.

*****

I serve this with a salad on the side and fruit/jello.

I'm not a big fan of sausage. Would that also work with something like pulled turkey meat?
And I cannot eat cottage cheese. Is there some sort of suitable substitute for that ingredient?

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Sunday, November 10, 2019 5:11 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


Quote:


Here is an enitrely made-up recipe that family is OK with for quiche. (Hubby hates quiches except for this one.)

Line the bottom (JUST the bottom) of a loaf pan with commercial or homemade pie crust. Bake at 400F until golden, about 15 minutes; remove from oven

Place into food processor or blender
about 6" turkey sausage, sliced
1 carton cottage cheese (I rinse and drain it to reduce salty/sour taste)
6 oz shredded cheese (I use "Italian blend" but you can use whatever you like)
4 eggs
1/4 c flour
1/2 c milk
youcan add cooked broccoli, chopped parsley, cooked onions or fresh green onions or mushrooms

blenderize it to desired texture (You can make it smooth and uniform or leave visible peices of sausage and vegetables ... it's up to you.

Pour into the loaf pan and bake at 325 until inserted knife comes out cleanly, about 1 1/4 hour.
*****
I serve this with a salad on the side and fruit/jello.
=SIGNY


I'm not a big fan of sausage. Would that also work with something like pulled turkey meat? JSF



It depends on the flavor and texture. Sausage or REAL smoked meat adds a smokey flavor and salt. Pulled turkey? What's that? If it's just slow-cooked turkey then it might be kind of flavorless and stringy. OTOH if it has a flavor and texture that you enjoy ... by all means! I can see adding thyme, sage and parsley for a "stuffed turkey" or "turkey pot pie" flavor, just stir in some cooked peas, carrots, celery and even cooked cubed potatoes before pouring it into the loaf pan.

Quote:

And I cannot eat cottage cheese. Is there some sort of suitable substitute for that ingredient?-JSF


Hmm... cottage cheese. I remember you bringing that up before. I'm not sure if we ever got to the bottom of whether or not it was a lactose problem (in which milk and all soft cheeses would cause the same reaction of bloating and gas) or whether it was a milk protein problem (in which case ALL cow's milk products would cause the same problem, typically diarrhea) or whether it was a flavor/texture/association problem specific to cottage cheese.

I only use cottage cheese to "bulk up" the quiche with something that's relatively bland and lowfat but still with a lot of protein. If you're OK with cheeses in general then substitue ricotta, part-skim mozarella, lofat swiss or any lofat cheese of choice. If you're using a hard cheese then add milk or water to make up the missing water content... maybe another 1/3 cup or so. Play around with the recipe, it's pretty tolerant.



-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

You idiots have been oppressing the entire sexual spectrum as long as you have existed. I can't wait for the day your kind is dead - WISHIMAY

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Monday, November 11, 2019 8:14 PM

SIGNYM

I believe in solving problems, not sharing them.


In praise of beet greens, collards, kale, turnip greens and chard.

Not too crazy about beets, I only like them pickled but oh, the greens are something else! Not quite as fragile as spinach but also grown in muddy/ silty soil they need a lot of washing. With a flavor that is je ne sais quoi but oh-so-tasty sauteed lightly in olive oil or added to minestrone.

Kale: Love it in Zupa Toscana (thaank you Olive Garden for posting the recipe): sweet Italian sausage cooked in chicken broth with sauteed onion, potato, and chopped kale. Add black pepper, some bacon crisps, and cream at the end. Magnifique!

Turnip greens: I like turnips even less than beets... I think I can safely say that I hate them, but the greens are ever-so-tasty sauteed with butter and mixed with noodles and cream sauce.

Chard, preferably rainbow chard. They have a sour flavor. The best recipe for them: cut out the stems and dice them, ribbon the leaves. Lightly sautee sliced garlic in olive oil then add the stems. (With the pink, maroon, bright gold, white and greenish stems it looks like pretty confetti!) Add a splash of white wine and continue cooking until tender, add the leaves, cover and wilt. Add a couple of teaspoons of lemon juice and a good sprinkling of Parmesan and enjoy!

Collards ... the recipe that I enjoy best is simply collards with bacon,onions, and black pepper.

-----------
Pity would be no more,
If we did not MAKE men poor - William Blake

You idiots have been oppressing the entire sexual spectrum as long as you have existed. I can't wait for the day your kind is dead - WISHIMAY

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