OTHER SCIENCE FICTION SERIES

Marvel / DC / Comic Thread

POSTED BY: DESKTOPHIPPIE
UPDATED: Wednesday, October 26, 2016 16:42
SHORT URL:
VIEWED: 2979
PAGE 1 of 1

Friday, January 19, 2007 2:38 AM

DESKTOPHIPPIE



*this thread follows American release dates, so there'll be spoilers for posters outside the US*

Just realised we're not discussing it here. Anyone reading it? What are your opinions? Any thoughts on where it's all going?

I'm enjoying it, although some characters seem a bit off in the actual Civil War comics themselves. The inidividual character comics are great - I'm especially enjoying Spider-Man's arc. (The final panel of Amazing Spider-Man 535 was my wallpaper for a while.)

Any other Marvel comic geeks out there?




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, January 19, 2007 2:42 AM

BROWNCOAT1

May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one.


I have mixed emotions on Marvel's Civil War. My biggest problem w/ the whole thing has been that every single issue has been late. The delays are aggrivating and the excuses for the delays are ridiculous. After all the hype Marvel flooded us with to be late with the books every single time is just an insult.

Some of the characters have acted totally out of the ordinary and there is no real explaination on some of them.

I have really enjoyed the Spider Man arc, but then again I am a long time Spidey fan. I think his development during the Civil War has been the best.

Have you read Casualties of War?

__________________________________________
Holding the line since December '02!

[img] [/img]

Richmond, VA & surrounding area Firefly Fans:

http://www.richmondbrowncoats.org

Color Sergeant

[img] [/img]

http://76thbattalion.homestead.com/index.html


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, January 19, 2007 10:02 AM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Nope, not yet. At least not that I'm aware of. I'm relying on downloads as it's hard to get your hands on the latest comics over here - without spending a fortune anyway!

I know what you mean about characters acting out of character. It's a shame as it's not that difficult to pull off this story - Stark was always very controlling and Mr. Fantastic has always tended to think of science before people.

So far I've read the Civil War comics up to #5, the Front Line comics up to #8 (I think... I'll have to check) The Spider-Man stuff, the X-Men stuff, the Young Avengers and Runaways stuff (loved that one) and some of the other solo comics - still catching up on Wolverine and Punisher.

I'm assuming someone is controlling everything behind the scenes, but I really don't want that to be the case. It lets Stark off the hook completely and it's been done too many times before.




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, January 19, 2007 10:35 AM

BROWNCOAT1

May have been the losing side. Still not convinced it was the wrong one.


I am hoping that Marvel doesn't take the easy way out and say the events in Civil War were one of their usual excuses for erasing everything from a comic arc:

- evil being controlling one or more heroes, government officials or both

- the events actually took place on one of the myriad other alternate Earths

- it was all a bad dream

- it was a vision of a possible future

I think that Marvel or to lie in the bed they have made with the Civil War arcs. I also don't want to see a plethora of Civil War spin off books. These are always lame and are just a way for them to capitalize further.

__________________________________________
Holding the line since December '02!

[img] [/img]

Richmond, VA & surrounding area Firefly Fans:

http://www.richmondbrowncoats.org

Color Sergeant

[img] [/img]

http://76thbattalion.homestead.com/index.html


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, January 19, 2007 10:46 AM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Agreed.

I want to see them finish what they started. Which in fairness Marvel themselves have promised - that there will be a clear winner in the war.

I'm dissapointed that the pro-reg side was made so evil so quickly. When the issue first cropped up I found myself leaning very slightly towards registration - which I would never have imagined I'd do. Kids with massive powers need training and advice and guidance, and you really can't have people running around taking the law into their own hands, unless the law resembles something from 1984. The book I mean.

In #5 when the drugged Peter said "I just wanted to do the right thing... did you know my girlfriend died of a broken neck?" I thought *that* was the argument that had been missing the whole time. It also finally made me understand why Peter sided with Iron Man.

But instead of exploring this they immediatly had a meddling government talk about using the heroes to establish tighter control at home and abroad, and the next thing you know all the anti-reg guys who are caught are in the negative zone. It just got too messy too quickly. I really can't understand why any character would support registration at this point. So it irks me when some still do.

And I want consequences. Big ass consequences. Marvel already took a huge leap wiping out most of the mutants - I do *not* want them to wimp out now!




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, January 22, 2007 1:18 PM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Bumping in case there are any other Marvel geeks out there.

Or DC fans could hijack the thread in the name of Infinate Crisis or Kingdom Come or whatever.




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, January 22, 2007 1:59 PM

HELL'S KITTEN


Quote:

Originally posted by DesktopHippie:
In #5 when the drugged Peter said "I just wanted to do the right thing... did you know my girlfriend died of a broken neck?" I thought *that* was the argument that had been missing the whole time. It also finally made me understand why Peter sided with Iron Man.

Heh. Which one? The one he killed originally, or is this a new one? Hee hee... that morbid fact always makes me giggle.

ANYWAYS...!

To get all spoilery, can you (anyone) tell me what the whole CIVIL WAR story-arc is all about? I don't have the time, patience, or motivation to read the issues myself. (Although, the first two issues of Punisher: War Journal by Matt Fraction are excellent.)

************************************************
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sara013


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, January 22, 2007 2:22 PM

NICODEMUS


Since the only comic(s) I read these days is Cable & Deadpool, my exposure to the Civil War has been somewhat limited, although seeing as how C & DP seems to be an excuse for Marvel to field as many of their characters in one series as possible (ie year one included, but was not limited to SHIELD, the X-Men, the Silver Surfer and many more), the Civil War storyline is pretty much just more of the same.

If viewed from a purely C & DP perspective, the whole Civil War storyline looks like nothing more than an excuse to have Deadpool picking fights with all the big( and not so big) names.

HK - the storyline is fairly simple. After a mutant blows up a school, the US Government gets to implement their mutant registration act (as mentioned in the first X-men film, amongst other places) and the mutant community splits into two sides: those who are willing to register their names and abilities (their poster boy being Spidey, who unmasked on national TV); and those who refuse to register. (Some of) the ones who register get to hunt down those who didn't, thus Deadpool gets an excuse to pick fights and crack jokes.

**************
Demolitions specialist for the 76th Independent Battalion.
From blowing open locked fridges, to destroying Alliance gun emplacements, it's all fun for me.
http://76thbattalion.homestead.com/Index.html

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, January 23, 2007 12:49 PM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Quote:

Originally posted by Hell's Kitten:
Quote:

Originally posted by DesktopHippie:
In #5 when the drugged Peter said "I just wanted to do the right thing... did you know my girlfriend died of a broken neck?" I thought *that* was the argument that had been missing the whole time. It also finally made me understand why Peter sided with Iron Man.

Heh. Which one? The one he killed originally, or is this a new one? Hee hee... that morbid fact always makes me giggle.



You get a giggle from Peter accidentally breaking Gwen Stacy's neck when he tried to rescue her with his webbing?

Seriously???

Ninjakitty, you scare me.

But to answer your question, he was referring to Gwen. The blonde one. He's still with Mary Jane. The readhead. Who is alive and healthy. For now.

The Civil War story is pretty much as Nicodemus said. It should be noted that it comes hot on the heels of another event called 'House of M' which lead to most mutants in the Marvelverse losing their powers. Obviously most of the "big name" characters either kept theirs or got them back through various means, and superheroes bitten by radioactive spiders or changed by cosmic rays or exposed to radioactive spills or whatever weren't effected. Just mutants. Anyway, this and a few other things have meant that paranoia was pretty much at breaking point before the explosion. Now it's hit critical.

Loads of info on wikipedia about it all.




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:40 PM

HELL'S KITTEN


Quote:

Originally posted by DesktopHippie:
You get a giggle from Peter accidentally breaking Gwen Stacy's neck when he tried to rescue her with his webbing?

Yes... with clarification...

That was written in 1973, and that sort of thing just didn't happen in comics back then. It was shocking and unthinkable to kill off such an important character. It was a big step to take... and the management allowed it.

After that, the story has been rewritten many times, with different outcomes, different victims, all almost in attempt to cover-up or erase that horrible death. That's really what makes me giggle: a group took a bit of courage and did something outside the norm in order to get a good story and meaningful character development (Reminds me of something Joss would do), and the subsequent groups turn into sissies and try to make it like it never happened.

Of course, I could have that all wrong.

Anyways, thank you - and Nicodemus - for explaining. I hadn't even remembered there was the "House of M" event. I just can't keep up with all of that...

Nicodemus - I always loved Deadpool! How is the book with Cable? I was never fond of Cable, so I've neglected to pick it up.


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:49 PM

CYBERSNARK


Quote:

Originally posted by Hell's Kitten:
That's really what makes me giggle: a group took a bit of courage and did something outside the norm in order to get a good story and meaningful character development (Reminds me of something Joss would do), and the subsequent groups turn into sissies and try to make it like it never happened.

Kinda like the Electric Superman arc.

I miss Electric Supes.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, January 23, 2007 2:59 PM

NVGHOSTRIDER


Because I'm lazy but still a fan, someone convince me to pick up on this story. It's been a long while (Frank Millers Man Without Fear arc) since anything has really captured me.

Someone convince me.



NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, January 23, 2007 3:08 PM

HELL'S KITTEN


Quote:

Originally posted by nvghostrider:
Because I'm lazy but still a fan, someone convince me to pick up on this story. It's been a long while (Frank Millers Man Without Fear arc) since anything has really captured me.

I am wholly incapable of convincing you to pick up this story. It could be good....

I read too many Independents and non-super-hero books. I would be happy to try to convince you to pick those up...

************************************************
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sara013


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Tuesday, January 23, 2007 4:24 PM

CYBERSNARK


I'm more a DC man, m'self.

That said, I'm doing my best to ignore the big annual OMFG THIS CHANGES EVERYTHING!!!!111!!!1 Events(tm). They never change anything and never involve any real character development. Not since Zero Hour, anyway.

Plus there's the whole issue of substituting retcons for actual change.

I like the second- and third-string characters. Teen Titans, Supergirl, the Question, Aztek. . .

Hell, does anybody else even remember Aztek?

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 24, 2007 9:56 AM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Civil War is still rumbling on, so unless you're invested in the characters involved I'd say wait for the complilation books to come out. Or download the first one or two and see what you think before you go buying.

House of M is worth a look. I enjoyed it a lot. Again, it helps that I was a fan of a lot of the characters involved - I've always been a Spider-Man / Avengers / X-Men fan.

On the subject of Gwen Stacy, the current 'Amazing Spider-Man' comics are being written by J Michael Straczynski. As in JMS, the genius behind the TV show 'Babylon 5.' It's safe to say he's not a man to shy away from the messy stuff, and he's handled the mistakes of previous writers brilliantly. (Marvel in the early nineties was *not* a pretty sight... although in fairness Onslaught and Operation Zero Tolerance did a lot to make up for that.) He's also added a healthy dose of character development of his own, not just to Peter, but to other characters such as Mary Jane and Aunt May. In particular, he *finally* had Aunt May find out that Peter is Spider-Man, and the resulting changes in the relationship between the two characters has made for great reading.

Straczynski is writing for the Fantastic Four too, although I don't really follow that comic. Still, considering Joss Whedon himself is writing Uncanny X-Men I'm pretty much in comic heaven!

The annual here-comes-a-big-event -lets-kill-off-some-lesser-heroes -then-bring-them-back thing can get pretty tiresome. I'm giving this one a go as 'House of M' had actual consequences and, like the DC masterpiece 'Crisis on Infinate Earths', it arose from a need to tidy up a universe where things had been allowed to get pretty messy. I also like the idea behind Civil War, and to be honest I think it's an issue that's needed to be addressed for quite some time.

On the DC side, I've heard great things about '52', a series set over the 52 weeks all the major heroes went missing from the DC 'verse. The issues I've read have been really good.

Okay, I'm typing too much. Someone else take over!




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 24, 2007 12:13 PM

CYBERSNARK


I missed out on the first few weeks, and I loathe getting a story out of order (it reminds me of a certain TV network that I don't like), so I'm waiting for the TPBs.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 24, 2007 12:19 PM

NVGHOSTRIDER


Sure HK. Gimme some idea of what to look for in the indie section. Lemmy knows I can't stop buyin' at the local fetish shop once I get started. Non-hero stuff has always been appealing, just don't know what to pick up.

I seen some of the House of M stuff DTH. I just never got to pick up on it. I was just thinkin', the last series I started buying was the Ghost Rider 2099. I loved how technology took the place of religion and wonderment in the world.

Hope I wasn't too jacktastic with the thread folks. If I was just slap me. Wait, that might not be a good idea. I think I like it.



NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 24, 2007 1:18 PM

HELL'S KITTEN


Quote:

Originally posted by DesktopHippie:
In particular, he *finally* had Aunt May find out that Peter is Spider-Man,

...wait...what??

Have you read JMS' other comics? I've enjoyed quite a few of them, even though I'm not as fond as the superheroes as I used to be. He's one of the good writers who seems to bring more to his comics than just another oddly coloured spandex uniform.
Quote:

Still, considering Joss Whedon himself is writing Uncanny X-Men I'm pretty much in comic heaven!

...wait...what?
You mean Astonishing X-Men? Or is he now on Uncanny...? (And you know he's taking over Runaways with issue... I think... 24?)
Quote:

The annual here-comes-a-big-event -lets-kill-off-some-lesser-heroes -then-bring-them-back thing can get pretty tiresome.
Yeah. Blue Beetle. Who the f cared about the Blue Beetle? NO ONE. UNTIL, of course, he got visciously killed off. But I will not rant, no.

************************************************
http://www.flickr.com/photos/sara013


NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 24, 2007 4:05 PM

NICODEMUS


HK, you wanted to know what C & DP was like?



Well, apart from my comments earlier in the thread about them bringing in anyone and everyone from the Marvel 'verse to try and stop Cable (stupid Messiah complex, just cos he's seen the future and thinks the only way to prevent is get everyone to band together, even if it is against him), it's quite Deadpool-heavy. He gets the most (and of course, the best) lines,

Select to view spoiler:


he gets to lobotomise and repeatedly kill Cable

and he's always hitting on any females (or trying on their clothes). My advice would be for you to find one of the TPBs in your local store and have a flip through it.

**************

Shameless plugging for a month or so.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 24, 2007 4:41 PM

HELL'S KITTEN


Quote:

Originally posted by Nicodemus:
HK, you wanted to know what C & DP was like?

Select to view spoiler:


he gets to lobotomise and repeatedly kill Cable


Okay. That's all I need, thanks. Off to comic shop to buy all issues...! *glee!*

NV - I'm working on a list for you!

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 24, 2007 5:04 PM

CYBERSNARK


Quote:

Originally posted by Hell's Kitten:
Yeah. Blue Beetle. Who the f cared about the Blue Beetle? NO ONE.



I DID!!


He and Booster were like the Tick and Arthur done as actual superheroes.

Remember that time he spent an entire issue of FKATJLA on the phone, waiting for Batman to pick up?

The Blue Beetle --ON HOLD!!!


(That said, though, I do kinda appreciate the "lineage" thing DC's trying to set up. The "Superhero" will live on, even if the individual character dies. Kinda makes me optimistic that Batman Beyond can be squeezed into comic continuity [superceding the Kingdom Come future, which isn't anywhere near as awesome].)

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Thursday, January 25, 2007 1:00 PM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Quote:

Originally posted by Hell's Kitten:
Quote:

Originally posted by DesktopHippie:
In particular, he *finally* had Aunt May find out that Peter is Spider-Man,

...wait...what??



I SAID,
Aunt May found out he was Spider-Man. Which is a good thing really, since he also announced it to the entire world at a press conference at the White House.



Quote:

Quote:

Still, considering Joss Whedon himself is writing Uncanny X-Men I'm pretty much in comic heaven!

...wait...what?
You mean Astonishing X-Men? Or is he now on Uncanny...? (And you know he's taking over Runaways with issue... I think... 24?)




Doh! My bad! Astonishing X-Men is what I meant. And I should add that he's written the best Wolverine I've read in quite some time.

He also writes a kickass Shadowkat, but even if I hadn't read his intro to the 'Fray' comic I'd totally guess that he had a crush on that character.

I'd heard he was moving to Runaways. I'm glad, I like that book. Don't read it nearly enough though.

Quote:

Quote:

The annual here-comes-a-big-event -lets-kill-off-some-lesser-heroes -then-bring-them-back thing can get pretty tiresome.
Yeah. Blue Beetle. Who the f cared about the Blue Beetle? NO ONE. UNTIL, of course, he got visciously killed off. But I will not rant, no.




Can I be really horrible and say that I actually liked the Blue Beetle's death?

DON'TKILLMEDON'TKILLMEJUSTLISTENDON'TKILLME!

The Blue Beetle was a guy who became a superhero out of a true sense of duty. No powers, no special gizmos, no one to avenge, just a promise to a dying friend. He could have ignored the promise when he lost the scarab before he'd even begun, but he didn't. He just sucked it up, built himself up, trained as hard as he could and did the job himself. I love that.

And I love the way his character ended, because it underscores how he was actually one of the greatest heroes in the DC 'verse. Sooooo often the hero is faced with the decision to give up and join the bad guys or face death. And every time, every time he makes a witty comment and finds a way to get out of it. Even if they *do* stare death in the face, they always make it in the end. And if not, they know that someone will carry on the fight.

Not the Blue Beetle. No one believed him. No one knew what he was sacrificing. No one cared enough about him. He faced that decision utterly alone knowing not only that he couldn't win, but also that no one else would carry on the fight.

Just think how easy it would have been to compromise at that moment. He could have pretended to join Max in his master plan and got the evidence he needed to convince the other heroes, but he didn't. He wouldn't. He couldn't compromise who he was, he refused to take the easy way out. He stuck to his guns and stayed the hero, not backing out even in the face of a total, utter, unheroic defeat that wouldn't even see his memory toasted to by the other heroes after he was gone. I don't know of any other character in any comic that has ever been in a situation that comes anywhere near anything close to that, and it is absolutely the best ending of any character I have ever come accross. Ever.

That's what I think anyway. Let the flamage commence! *puts on heatproof outfit*




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Thursday, January 25, 2007 1:05 PM

HELL'S KITTEN


Ah. I see.

I've been reading comics for probably 20-25 years now, and I had never even heard of the Blue Beetle. Next thing I know, there was a fanboy uprising over his death and suddenly he gets his own comic.

*shrug*

There are many things wrong with that, but won't ramble.

EDIT: I like your assessment of his demise, DTH. Very nicely explained.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Thursday, January 25, 2007 1:12 PM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Well I have to admit, I'm one of the ones who found out more about him after he'd died than I'd ever known before. I just loved what I found. It kinda makes me wish I'd read more DC. Still, there are only a limited number of hours in the day, and I'm more emotionally invested in the marvel 'verse.




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Thursday, January 25, 2007 11:27 PM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


I forgot to add that J. Jonah Jameson's immediate reaction to finding out his photographer was Spider-Man was very, very funny. In fact, it's one of my favourite 'Civil War' moments so far. It got kinda sad when you realised just how hurt and upset he was by the whole thing, but the initial reaction was priceless.




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, January 31, 2007 12:57 PM

FLAKBAIT


I can't say I'm a big fan of Civil War. It seems like a lot of characters have been shoehorned into one side or the other via editorial fiat rather than what they would actually think. And some of the things they've done, like the whole Thor thing, are absolutely repulsive to me. I liked the beginning and the basic premise, but I feel like the execution is a little lacking. However, the Bucky tie-in issue that came out a few weeks ago (I forget what it was called now—Casualties of War?), by Brubaker, was a fantastic issue and easily the best single issue of Civil War to date.

The other Marvel event, though, Annihilation? That's freaking awesome! It's almost over now, so they should start collecting it soon, and I can't recommend it enough. If anyone wants a reading list for it, I'll gladly provide one.

I've only gotten into DC very much in the past few years, but it’s gradually been taking over my pull list. JSA easily became my favorite team book in a long time (ever since Chuck Austen’s stint on Avengers permanently drove me away from Earth’s Mightiest), even though I was pretty clueless as to who any of them were at the beginning. I ate up the Infinite Crisis and loved it, and am loving 52.

Shame on the Beetle bashing! I read his original series back in the day and loved it, and the Beetle-Booster dynamic is what made the JLI period so great. His death was the saddest I’ve been in a long time. It’s a lot of fun to see Booster finally getting some decent attention in 52. One thing I don’t like is DC’s death trend ever since Ted’s demise. The writers seem to have some competition to see who can kill off more characters per month or something.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Friday, February 2, 2007 6:19 PM

PEULSAR5

We sniff the air, we don't kiss the dirt.


I'm also not a big fan of Civil War. The last all encompassing big event I actually enjoyes was the first Crisis and Zero Hour. They actually served a purpose in streamlining the DC Universe. Infinite Crisis seems to have jumbled everything up again (Is Jade dead or not? Hey look, Jason Todd's back! I seem to recall paying a toll call 20 years ago to kill him.) All caused by the very first Superman and Superboy beating on a wall. Also, loved the fight between the 2 Supermen. Seems to me the Golden Age Superman who, like the Silver Age Superman, was known to move planets out of orbit and such, should have layed out the current Superman with one punch.

As far as Civil War, I am curious how they are going to fix the Spider-man secret identity thing. Is the Scarlett Witch going to return and cast a hex? Will Dr Strange cast a spell? Will Phoenix wipe everyone's memory?

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Saturday, February 3, 2007 5:27 AM

CYBERSNARK


As far as I understand it: the original Crisis was intended to wipe out all the alternate universes so there'd be only on "real" universe.

Of course, new universes started popping up pretty much the day after Crisis (we have the Batman movie 'verse, the Superman movies, the DCAU, the Kingdom Come future[*], that "Amalgam" crossover with Marvel[**], the antimatter universe, the Image universe [when Captain Majestic and Superman traded places], the Justice Lords universe [seen in the DCAU], hypertime, the Smallville continuity. . .).

The new Infinite Crisis was supposedly about undoing the original Crisis and re-instituting the idea of parallel worlds --which didn't need to be done!

Huge waste of time for a meaningless spectacle whose only lasting change was to kill off a bunch of characters (including my fav'rit) and rob us of a year's worth of actual character development through that "One Year Later" crap.

(* Yes, I know the DCAU and the comic 'verse supposedly aren't connected, but the McGinnis Batman [from Batman Beyond] has turned up a couple of times in "flash forward" segments in the Batman/Superman series. Unfortunately for the cannon, Batman Beyond and Kingdom Come [the official future] are mutually-exclusive. In the DCAU, Batman retires and Gotham degenerates into crime and corruption again. In Kingdom Come, Gotham becomes a police state ruled over by the aging Batman, who can no longer leave his cave.)

(** Which is in-canon, as evidenced by Blue Beetle's use of Spiderman's "impact webbing," which he attributed to "some guy who swung through here from a parallel universe a few months ago.")

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Sunday, February 4, 2007 5:31 AM

FLAKBAIT


"The new Infinite Crisis was supposedly about undoing the original Crisis and re-instituting the idea of parallel worlds --which didn't need to be done! "

Actually, and I'm certainly not an expert, the Infinite Crisis was about fixing a lot of the continuity errors that cropped up after the original crisis. After the original merging of all the parrallel worlds, there were a lot of hiccups in the timestream (though I think the concept of Hypertime was supposed to fix that).

There's still only one reality in the DCU (other than the Elseworlds stuff, but those are just "What if..." type things). The Infinite Crisis was an attempt to sort of reset things so they could firmly establish a solid continuity for the Universe.

At least, I think that was what they intended. I'm still pretty new to DC, so I'm a little foggy on it.

NOTIFY: Y   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Sunday, February 4, 2007 7:01 AM

CYBERSNARK


Quote:

Originally posted by flakbait:
There's still only one reality in the DCU

Except that there isn't. Even if you disregard the alternate takes that the mainstream DCU hasn't crossed over with, there's still the Animatter universe (with evil versions of the DCU heroes, and possibly a few Marvel-like characters), the Marvel universe (as seen in Amalgam), the Image universe (Superman & Mr. Majestic briefly traded places), and the Batman Beyond future (evidenced by Terry-Bat's occasional cameos). All of these crossovers are established canon, which means that they represent realities existing in parallel with the main DCU.

Plus there's Mxyzptlk's and Joker's messing with the timeline in Batman/Superman, which allowed Bizzaro to gather five different Supergirls, two of whom didn't exist in the "official" timeline (Pre-Crisis Supergirl [who appeared alongside Power Girl], and Cir-El [who had pre-emptively erased herself from existence]). We also saw yet another DCU variant, with a teenaged Superlad fighting alongside Batwoman and Superwoman.

Then, of course, Infinite Crisis hinged on Alex Luthor's manipulating of thousands of alternate DCU "Earths" (many of which appeared to have been pre-existing), trying to remake Earth-Prime.

Quote:

The Infinite Crisis was an attempt to sort of reset things so they could firmly establish a solid continuity for the Universe.
Which is exactly what the original Crisis was about.

See, Infinite Crisis was about two different things: it was the culmination of the "darker, grittier" DCU that had been appearing lately --this was what caused the rift between Batman and the JLU (which led to the OMAC project and Brother Eye), and between Wonder Woman and the superheroic community (after she murdered Max Lord). This would've been perfect; a character-driven "Crisis" like we haven't seen since the "Death of Superman" era.

Instead, they also shoehorned in the Pre-Crisis survivors who were trying to "fix" things (that didn't need to be fixed, since their "perfect world" would have existed somewhere out there in hypertime already). Thus, they had to bring in Alexander Luthor, the huge Anti-Monitor tower, and Superboy Prime to steal the spotlight from the actual characters that fans have been following for years.

-----
We applied the cortical electrodes but were unable to get a neural reaction from either patient.

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, February 5, 2007 12:15 PM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


Quote:

Originally posted by Peulsar5:

As far as Civil War, I am curious how they are going to fix the Spider-man secret identity thing. Is the Scarlett Witch going to return and cast a hex? Will Dr Strange cast a spell? Will Phoenix wipe everyone's memory?



No no no no no no no no NO BLOODY RESETS!!! Absolutely none! I won't accept it! If they rest the whole Civil War thing I will give up on Marvel!


*folds her arms*



*weakens*



Oh who am I kidding. I won't give up on Marvel until Wolverine is using his adamantium claws to cut pretty paper dolls-erm... I won't give up on Marvel ever. But if they reset I will be seriously miffed!

Besides, how can you do a reset when House of M is the ultimate anti-reset story? It would just destroy that series, *and* everything it was building up to.

No resets. Peter's a public figure now. That could make for some of the best Spider-man stories ever. I want to see consequences, dammit!

I should also add that I have a tendancy to refer to Infinate Crisis when I actually mean Crisis on Infinate Earths. I know, I know, I'm a terrible Marvel-loving DC-heathen ignoramus. *feels shame*




Graphics available at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Monday, February 26, 2007 1:38 PM

DESKTOPHIPPIE


*sings* Waaarrrr iiiissss ooooovvveeeerrrr! Iiiiffff yyyyooouuuu wwaaaaaaannnttt iiittttt!

Civil War has officially ended. And without giving away the ending to those that haven't read it (or cracked and allowed themselves to be spoiled *points at self*) there were no resets, no one-side forgiving the other and no happy, consequencesless ending.

This is the review given by Chris' Invincible Super Blog - http://the-isb.blogspot.com - spoiler tagged to protect the unspoiled and innocent.

Select to view spoiler:


Civil War #7: And now, the reason we're all here. At this point, everything that I can tell you about the last issue of Civil War has already been said elsewhere, and I've even taken my own shots at it with Wednesday's 30-second recap, but it bears repeating: This has got to be the biggest pile of nothing that I have ever read.

To its credit, the artwork is fantastic. Steve McNiven's a great talent, and with Morry Hollowell's coloring, this has been an absolutely beautiful book from start to finish, even if he did forget that the Vision's a kid these days. The script, however, fails on every conceivable level. The biggest problem, of course, is that after all these months, with a year's worth of delays and promises that it's only late beacuse while the ending was awesome, they wanted to rewrite it to be super-awesome, it ends in the most poorly-written and anticlimactic resolution of Mark Millar's entire career. It's so wildly problematic that I don't even know where to begin, but I'll just start by saying that Captain America's tackled by a group of emergency workers who might as well be carrying a banner reading "THE HEROES OF 9/11" in grand political cartoon fashion, it's actually less tasteful than when the ghosts of the dead firemen show up in last month's issue of Tarot. And if they hadn't jumped on him, are we really supposed to believe that Captain America was about to decapitate Tony Stark--his friend--like he did to the Red Skull? Really?

Not that I could really blame him, considering the way Tony Stark's been characterized through the whole series. It's not enough that he's a facist who thinks it's a good idea to send out a team of serial murderers to kill Spider-Man, but he's become thoroughly unlikeable as a person. The cheap shot at Maria Hill at the end of the series--which would maybe be understandable if they hadn't been on the same side for the whole thing--just seals the deal of making him a total prick, and I honestly can't understand why anybody would want to read about that guy anymore.

And it only gets worse from there. The idea that this whole huge "event" has led to Captain America bursting into tears at the sight of a few wrecked buildings--in a city that's been invaded by Atlantis, trashed by Galactus, had literal Roman Catholic Hell break out, and had mile-long profanity carved into it with orbital laser beams¹--is only slightly less preposterous than the fact that it leads Captain America, one of two characters who stands as the voice of morality in the Marvel Universe, to quit. I honestly don't mean to go all fan-entitlement on anybody, but Sweet Christmas, Captain America doesn't quit. It's what defines him as a character. And for him to quit specifically in a battle that revolves around freedom is... well, it's crazy.

And that's just the high point, which in itself is predicated on the idea that Black Panther--a master tactician in his own right--thinks it's a good idea to teleport the giant super-hero battle into the middle of downtown Manhattan. And it just keeps getting worse, from the pithy, faux-tough dialogue to the phenomenally trite and poorly-written letter from Reed Richards (who, incidentally, apparently forgot that he's got stretching powers that would protect him from being shot, and that his wife can create force fields), to Spider-Man's nonsensical costume change. The parts that are "good" are only good in the way that all recent Mark Millar stories are good: They're exciting. Who doesn't want to see Namor show up and yell his catchphrase, or watch Hercules bash Cyborg Murderclone Thor's head in? Right on, that's stuff we all like. But it's cheap, and it's easy, and unlike The Ultimates--a book that's entirely based around cheap, easy fun--that's not nearly enough to save it here. Instead, all we're left with is a book that's thoroughly, unapologetically awful.

So, uh, anybody want to buy my run?



So... what do you think - agree? Disagree? Like it? Hate it? Anyone care?




Banners, avatars and other fun stuff at www.desktophippie.com

NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Sunday, December 13, 2009 3:59 AM

JAYNEZTOWN


http://comics.ign.com/articles/105/1052885p1.html

Quote:

December 7, 2009 - It's December now, and that generally means one thing around the IGN offices – the annual Best of Awards. It's been a massive year for the comics industry,with plenty of big releases, new event storylines, and a few surprising announcements. Even in the final weeks of 2009, the industry isn't pausing to reflect on the past 12 months. But that's where we come in.

You'll be seeing several features leading up to our Best Of awards, including our countdown of the year's top 100 covers. In this Year in Review feature, we take a look at the industry as a whole and what books made the biggest splash in 2009. In the first section, we cover the major announcements from Marvel, DC, Image and Dark Horse, and the independent publishers. From there, we profile the biggest books in 2009 based on (not necessarily the best or even the best-selling, but just the ones that got people talking the most). And finally, we wrap up with a look at what's coming in 2010. So far, we're not expecting the new year to be any easier on the poor wallet.




Marvel

Marvel's publishing strategy in 2009 could be summed up by two words – "Dark Reign". Less a structured event than a general story direction, the early months of 2009 saw nearly every book in Marvel's lineup affected by Norman Osborn's rise to power. Chief among these were the Avengers titles, including newcomer Dark Avengers. Dark Reign lasted throughout the summer in major storylines like "World's Most Wanted" in Invincible Iron Man, "American Son" in Amazing Spider-Man, and the Dark Avengers/Uncanny X-Men crossover Utopia. It was finally brought to a close through the Dark Reign: The List mini-series and the one-shot special Siege: The Cabal. Dark Reign may be over, but its effects will certainly be felt going into 2010.

While Dark Reign was big news, another announcement dominated the headlines in the second half of the year. In late August, Disney announced its plans to buy Marvel in an arrangement not unlike its purchase of Pixar several years ago. While a few conspiracy theorists predicted the "Disney-fication" of Marvel's books or inevitable team-ups between Wolverine and Mickey Mouse, most recognized the interesting possibilities such a merger could bring. The deal hasn't been finalized yet, and it's doubtful fans will notice much of a change in the next year or two, but hopefully the deal will eventually lead to more exposure for Marvel's books and characters.

Though it was quickly overshadowed by the Disney announcement, another major Marvel-related development caught the attention of fans over he summer. At SDCC, Marvel revealed they had acquired the rights to Marvelman, a series as well-known for its thorny legal problems as its quality storytelling. The deal includes both the rights to reprint the original Marvelman stories as well as new material. Readers have already been told to expect Marvelman's arrival in the Marvel Universe sometime in the future. As for reprints of the landmark stories by Alan Moore and Neil Gaiman from the '80s and '90s, the future is still uncertain.

2009 wasn't exactly the banner year for comic book movies that 2008 was, but one major Marvel movie did kick off the summer movie season. X-Men Origins: Wolverine saw Hugh Jackman reprise his role for the fourth time. The movie also gave many viewers their first exposure to the wise-cracking Deadpool, who is now reportedly due for a spinoff franchise in the next few years.



DC

Unlike Marvel, DC is already owned by a major multinational corporation. However, DC has existed as an almost autonomous entity within Warner Bros. Given the runaway success of Marvel Studios and its movie lineup, Warner Bros. decided the time had come to work more closely with DC. In September, coming hot off the heels of the Disney/Marvel announcement, Warners revealed that DC was being restructured. The company has now become DC Entertainment. President and publisher Paul Levitz stepped down from his positions (and subsequently became the new writer for Adventure Comics). In his place as president is Diane Nelson, with the new publisher yet to be revealed. The intention behind this shake-up is to create a greater synergy between DC and its parent company, leading to a wider presence of DC's iconic heroes in other media. As with the Disney/Marvel merger, we don't expect any noticeable changes right away, but it should be interesting to see the new DC take shape.

After many years of false starts, rejected scripts, legal squabbles, and angry words from Alan Moore, the Watchmen movie finally became a reality when it hit theaters in March. Long considered one of the most unfilmable graphic novels in the industry,director Zach Snyder nonetheless did his best to translate the entire saga into live-action, naked blue men and all. Whether he succeeded is up to the viewer. Regardless, Snyder succeeded where many had failed, and the film certainly brought a great deal of mainstream attention to the book.

While the early months of 2009 dealt with Final Crisis and its immediate aftermath, DC's attention quickly shifted to Blackest Night. This massive event has easily become the big hit of 2009, a feat made even more impressive by the fact that DC icons like Superman and Batman have played relatively minor roles. Heroes like Hawkman and Firestorm have risen to new levels of popularity thanks to this story. And as for Hal Jordan, he's basking in his status as the brightest hero in a dark universe.



Dark Horse & Image

As the industry moves forward, one of the big questions facing publishers is how to make use of new technologies and digital distribution. Dark Horse took their first step into a larger world when they announced their iPhone initiative. Many of Dark Horse's most popular series, including Hellboy and Umbrella Academy, have been translated into an iPhone-compatible format. Digital comics are a long way form overtaking the print versions, but these iPhone comics offer a glimpse of what the industry might look like in future decades.

While more and more comics are making their way to the big screen, several series are instead making the move to television. Easily the biggest announcement in this regard was the news that Robert Kirkman's Walking Dead is being adapted as a TV show by Frank Darabont (The Shawshank Redemption). The series is expected to air on AMC, meaning its graphic content should survive largely unscathed.

Two Image books have stood out in a particularly crowded industry in 2009. The first is a throwback to the Image of the early '90s, when artists like Todd McFarlane and Rob Liefeld drew in droves of readers and collectors on books like Spawn and Youngblood. Image United reunites six of those seven Image founders in a crossover that teams everyone from Spawn to Witchblade to Savage Dragon.

The other book is Chew, from writer John Layman and artist Rob Guillory. Like I Kill Giants in 2008,this quirky series rose from humble beginnings to a mountain of critical acclaim. Each issue has been reprinted multiple times, and still the demand seems to out-pace supply.



Independent Publishers

IDW had a particularly noteworthy year among the industry's smaller publishers, at times rivaling Image and Dark Horse in sales. 2009 saw the first year of IDW's G.I. Joe comics. Eschewing the familiar Joe universe created by Marvel and continued by Devil's Due, IDW offered a grittier, more realistic take on the colorful heroes. With major summer movies like G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra, Terminator Salvation, and Star Trek raking in money, IDW's licensed books proved especially lucrative in 2009.

For their part, Boom! Studios found success in their numerous Disney adaptations. Many of Boom's efforts have centered on popular Pixar movies like The Incredibles and Finding Nemo. Boom! has also enjoyed great success in its various Muppets comics. Despite the Disney/Marvel merger, Boom! Will continue to publish these books for the foreseeable future.

Though major comic book movies were relatively few and far between this year, several smaller adaptations hit the market in the waning months of the year. Both Surrogates and Whiteout debuted I nearly fall. Though neither achieved a great deal of box office success, fans of both franchises got a kick out of seeing them adapted on screen. And indy fans have plenty more to look forward to in 2010, not least of which being the long-awaited Scott Pilgrim movie.







Astonishing X-Men Motion Comic: Behind The Scenes!







Take a look behind the scenes of the hit Motion Comic with Edge Studios!


NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

Wednesday, October 26, 2016 4:42 PM

JAYNEZTOWN


'The Tick' is back, again


NOTIFY: N   |  REPLY  |  REPLY WITH QUOTE  |  TOP  |  HOME  

YOUR OPTIONS

NEW POSTS TODAY

USERPOST DATE

OTHER TOPICS

DISCUSSIONS
IT!
Sat, October 21, 2017 16:52 - 12 posts
Star Trek Discovery is AWESOME!
Sat, October 21, 2017 11:45 - 24 posts
Dark Matter
Tue, October 17, 2017 10:11 - 18 posts
Nathan Fillion on Rick and Morty
Sun, October 15, 2017 21:23 - 12 posts
Blade Runner II
Tue, October 10, 2017 10:14 - 13 posts
The Flash, Iron Fist, Legion...we have truly entered the era of comic book tv
Thu, October 5, 2017 12:37 - 24 posts
Taboo - Thomas Hardy
Thu, October 5, 2017 09:55 - 6 posts
In to the Badlands - scifi, drama, martial arts, post apocalyptic adventure
Thu, October 5, 2017 09:52 - 4 posts
Calling all Twin Peaks fans...Help!
Thu, October 5, 2017 09:47 - 18 posts
"The Orville" new SciFi on FOX
Mon, October 2, 2017 17:28 - 48 posts
Star Trek Discovery - A few good moments but largely poor, bad writing, very political? waste of money and may be cancelled after 2 seasons?
Sun, October 1, 2017 17:08 - 3 posts
Are There New TV Shows This Fall You Must See?
Sat, September 30, 2017 16:38 - 17 posts

FFF.NET SOCIAL